blue light associated with prostate and breast cancer

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Lightbringer
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No such thing as a “Lee minus blue” filter or nuttin’?

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

1stein
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This light is claimed to be for medical purposes. It says, it contains very little of blue wavelength. I wonder how true is it and what the led sits inside…

(ordered one a few days ago)

FindThisHumerus
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Doctor here.

Having an association does not mean that it causes cancer. What’s more likely (and again, I’m speculating) is that people exposed to more blue light have habits and lifestyles that make them more likely to get cancer. Considering the prostate is not even exposed to light, I would guess that this is the more likely scenario.

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teacher
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/\ … Now that hypothesis …. makes sense. Thanks FindThisHumerus. Beer

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pinkpanda3310
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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
IMO it’s mostly to do with ones lifestyle

FindThisHumerus wrote:
Doctor here.

Having an association does not mean that it causes cancer. What’s more likely (and again, I’m speculating) is that people exposed to more blue light have habits and lifestyles that make them more likely to get cancer. Considering the prostate is not even exposed to light, I would guess that this is the more likely scenario.


Nice to to get some back up sometimes Innocent

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Scallywag wrote:

My understanding is that blue light specifically is the type of light that impacts the sleep cycle, as opposed to red or green. And for this reason, warmer/cooler CCT lights have different effects. I’ve easily observed this in my own life: one room of my house has 2700K lighting, and I will fall asleep if I try to read a book in that room. The other areas of my home have 4000K to 5000K lighting, and I have no issues reading and staying awake there. 


Yes, this is a known effect which is measured and light sources can be ranked by impact on ipRGC (melanopic function).
See below a list of light sources with different CCT, blue %age and their relative melanopic potential :

(Source)
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FindThisHumerus wrote:
Doctor here.

Having an association does not mean that it causes cancer. What’s more likely (and again, I’m speculating) is that people exposed to more blue light have habits and lifestyles that make them more likely to get cancer. Considering the prostate is not even exposed to light, I would guess that this is the more likely scenario.

The article spells out very clearly that its reduced melatonin (and possible other changes in hormones due to that) which is directly causally linked to blue light exposure, this then increases risks of hormone-related cancers.

virencelights
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thanks , so is 3000k safe?.
considering a 2000k if it comes to all this.

thanks.

DominikM wrote:
Maybe I’ll show you some example – from photobiological safety point of view.

The main issue here is a blue light spike at 430-440nm – it’s caused by a phosphor coating quality and phosphor’s mix.

As you can see not only CCT matters, the 4000K cannot be named “safe” or “safer” sorry SKV89 ;).

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WARNING

reading this thread my cause cancer or worse still it may overstimulate your  hypochondria.

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thanks , – so what do you use daytime use?.
I have a 5600k E21A for daytime use.
I am even considering 3000 or 2000k for daytime use to be safe.

xenotar80 wrote:
This is the main reason I want most of my flashlights in 2000K or below. Blue light affects my sleep at night, so keeping my flashlights at 2000K won’t give me any melatonin suppression. All my lights in the house are halogen and i cover up all sources of LEDs with red or black tape. 2000K is a little spooky sometimes though since the color temp looks like a candle flame, so i have a bunch of 2700K flashlights on hand too… just an excuse for more flashlights.

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Tally-ho wrote:
Yes, this is a known effect which is measured and light sources can be ranked by impact on ipRGC (melanopic function). See below a list of light sources with different CCT, blue %age and their relative melanopic potential : (Source)

‘If’ I read it correctly, the chart indicates the only truly “safe” ones are:

  • I. Narrowband Amber LED
  • J. Low Pressure Sodium

Everything else has ‘at least’ 1% of Blue Light.

Wink

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virencelights
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thanks Teacher!. isn’t it best to just stop using say 6500k light by a certain time of the day and switch to way less such as 2700 and less?.
Red LED.

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If you are really concerned about reduced melatonin levels, melatonin supplements are pretty cheap and definitely help one sleep at night. 1-2mg for a night or two does the trick for me, and gets me back on normal sleep patterns for several days/weeks.

IMO the key here is keeping a regular sleep pattern. day in and day out, weekdays, weekends.

I wonder what other lifestyle factors are associated with the people who live in these areas, and how that affects their melatonin production and circadian rhythm?

Don’t think that just switching from a high temperature to low temperature light in your house is going to protect you. Perhaps that’s a good thing to do, but life’s much more complex than just what color light you are exposed to at night.

Sleep normal hours. Keep your room dark. Wind down before bed. If you’re a male, and if you live long enough, you’ll probably get prostate cancer anyway. My dad fell asleep in front of the TV for years and years. Prostate cancer finally killed him at age 86.

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optosolis wrote:
thanks Teacher!. isn’t it best to just stop using say 6500k light by a certain time of the day and switch to way less such as 2700 and less?.
Red LED.
I honestly have no earthly idea my friend, I was just looking at that chart. Smile Personally, I am not worried about it enough to change whatever CCT light I happen to be using.

But….. I do totally agree with what sbslider said in POST #44 Thumbs Up

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hank
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Quote:
habits and lifestyles

The nightly cycle of melatonin production suppresses tumor growth. Blue light suppresses that.
You can look this stuff up.
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&channel=tus&q=melaton...

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Nev wrote:

WARNING


reading this thread my cause cancer or worse still it may overstimulate your  hypochondria.

Good one Nev!! Beer . Big Smile

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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Blueness associated with testicular cancer!

Don't let your testicles get blue!

hank
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There’s ample reason to mock the idea — it’s scary.

Quote:
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in industrialised countries like the United States, where a significant proportion of workers engage in shift work, making a hypothesised relation between light exposure at night and cancer risk relevant. Observational studies support an association between night work and cancer risk. We hypothesise that the potential primary culprit for this observed association is the lack of melatonin, a cancer-protective agent whose production is severely diminished in people exposed to light at night.

https://www.nature.com/articles/6601626
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Cancer is very serious.

I just don't think blue light causes cancer.

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Quote:
melatonin supplements are pretty cheap and definitely help one sleep at night.

IIRC whether Melatonin supplements actually get anything past the blood-brain barrier is undecided. They are potentially helpful. My anecdote is that they do seem to help me get to sleep but I feel very groggy the next morning even if I take them fairly early the night/evening before. Could be placebo or just coincidence though.

Quote:
I just don’t think blue light causes cancer.

Every link in the causal chain is well tested and documented: blue light exposure reduces melatonin, reduced melatonin increases risks of certain types of cancer. The only question is whether this extends to something as widespread as working nights, if your sleep pattern is reversed from most, does it only matter if you are exposed to lots of blue light during your “relative night” or during actual nighttime as well?

Quote:
I am even considering 3000 or 2000k for daytime use to be safe.

The whole point is that it’s exposure to blue light during the night that is the major cause for these issues. No flashlight or screen comes close to matching the blue light production of the sun during the day. The only exception to that is if you’re on the night shift and have blue light exposure during the day, which to you is night.

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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
It rests on my bedside draw and is possibly my most used light as I don’t always sleep well.

very cool

do you think blue light could be keeping your melatonin suppressed?

Im interested in trying Red Trits

hank
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Quote:
Melatonin supplements … do seem to help me get to sleep but I feel very groggy the next morning

Most of the OTC melatonin pills are massive overdoses, far more than the body produces naturally during a dark night.
The pills dose you with 15 to 30 milligrams or more; one milligram is one thousand micrograms.

The body’d natural production is measured in _micro_grams.

Quote:
Endogenous nocturnal melatonin production has been estimated to be about 10–80 µg per night

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3402070/
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The risk that this poses for you to develop cancer has to be so small as to be almost infinitesimal. You are far more likely to develop a form of cancer from chemical exposure or other environmental/epigenetic factors. This thread needs to die.

hank wrote:
Quote:
Melatonin supplements … do seem to help me get to sleep but I feel very groggy the next morning

Most of the OTC melatonin pills are massive overdoses, far more than the body produces naturally during a dark night.
The pills dose you with 15 to 30 milligrams or more; one milligram is one thousand micrograms.

The body’d natural production is measured in _micro_grams.

Quote:
Endogenous nocturnal melatonin production has been estimated to be about 10–80 µg per night
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3402070/

Do you understand the concept of bioavailability? Or first pass metabolism?

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Mark M wrote:
This thread needs to die.

take some warm trits and call me in the morning
.
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After some more reading it seems Melatonin taken orally absolutely does pass the blood-brain barrier. Don’t know what the bioavailability is though, or how much is broken down in the gut before absorption.

Quote:
The risk that this poses for you to develop cancer has to be so small as to be almost infinitesimal.

Risk factors compound with one another though, and eliminating or reducing this one should be fairly easy for many people. Even if cancer risk isn’t the primary concern blue light exposure is clearly having numerous negative health affects for many people. Lack of sleep/lower sleep quality is linked with many other health conditions and overall reduced quality of life, productivity at work, etc.

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BurningPlayd0h wrote:
After some more reading it seems Melatonin taken orally absolutely does pass the blood-brain barrier. Don’t know what the bioavailability is though, or how much is broken down in the gut before absorption.

Not the gut, it undergoes hydroxylation in the liver. Just because you take a 15mg dose of a medication does not mean that it is the effective concentration that your body receives.

I am not arguing that there is no health risks from exposure to blue light wavelengths. Just that there is very flawed thinking by people with no formal training.

BurningPlayd0h wrote:
After some more reading it seems Melatonin taken orally absolutely does pass the blood-brain barrier. Don’t know what the bioavailability is though, or how much is broken down in the gut before absorption.
Quote:
The risk that this poses for you to develop cancer has to be so small as to be almost infinitesimal.

Risk factors compound with one another though, and eliminating or reducing this one should be fairly easy for many people. Even if cancer risk isn’t the primary concern blue light exposure is clearly having numerous negative health affects for many people. Lack of sleep/lower sleep quality is linked with many other health conditions and overall reduced quality of life, productivity at work, etc.

Risk factors do not always compound and I am not sure how you came to that conclusion, it would depend on numerous factors.

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Quote:
[melatonin] … Both the 2 and the 4 mg oral dosages showed an absolute bioavailability of approximately 15%.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10883420

Quote:
Men exposed to high levels of indoor artificial light also had 2.8-fold higher risk of developing prostate cancer

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/health/artificial-blue-light-prostate-bre...

You can look this stuff up.

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Mark M wrote:
Not the gut, it undergoes hydroxylation in the liver.

I agree with the spirit of what you’re saying here but reduction in effective dose can start by a substance being broken down by chemicals/temps independent of the body actively processing it. IDK if melatonin specifically is broken down by stomach acid though and if not, I see exactly what you meant.

Mark M wrote:
Just that there is very flawed thinking by people with no formal training.

Could you elaborate on this? Were the researchers in this study not properly trained/educated?

Mark M wrote:
Risk factors do not always compound and I am not sure how you came to that conclusion, it would depend on numerous factors.

Of course they don’t in every situation, but take for example being both a cigarette smoker and heavy drinker. Obviously one doesn’t cancel the other out and in most scenarios that would be the case too. Unless there are direct opposing effects/results they will.

Nevermind, it looks like the actual definition of “compounding risk factors” are those that are multiplicative with each other. I guess “additive” would be a better term?

Edit: It’s “accruing”. TIL

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hank wrote:
Quote:
Men exposed to high levels of indoor artificial light also had 2.8-fold higher risk of developing prostate cancer

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/health/artificial-blue-light-prostate-bre...

You can look this stuff up.

Since I haven’t read through the whole study itself, is that isolating this particular risk factor? News articles on medical studies have a LONG history of misinterpreting correlation as causation and ignoring any of the other research that shows they can’t study just one variable’s effects.

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