Ultrafire C303

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Don
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Ultrafire C303

This will be my last light for a while - just got an unexpected (and large) bill. So here are some pictures of what arrived this morning.

C303

Note the fine grooving - it gives a dark appearance, looking a bit like titanium. This picture has fairly accurate colours on my screen. It is quite a bit darker than the picture on Manafont's site where I bought it from. 

http://www.manafont.com/product_info.php/ultrafire-c303-r5-5mode-memory-...

It is weighs less than I expected, the metal walls are quite thin. It is only 58g without a cell which is surprisingly light for an 18650 torch. It is also 40g less than Manafont say. It is also non-magnetic and too thin to be aluminium. Whatever it is made of, it is very hard, it will scratch mild steel. Wonder if they sent me a titanium one by mistake. Smile The methods I know of checking involve dissolving the thing in fuming nitric acid or aqua regia neither of which are things it is all that easy to buy these days given that it they are a good starting point for making many explosives. And i don't fancy dissolving the new toy just to find out what it's made of. There probably are better ways if you happen to have access to gamma ray spectrometers and similar fun toys - but i don't know anyone who does.

This is the head end.

Threads

The interior of the tube is coated in some black stuff. The threads, as you can see, are sharp and cleanly cut.

Tailcap end

tailcap threads

 

Switch end. Someone's tightening tool slipped in the factory, hence the scratch.

Switch 

It certainly did not need any more tightening, though the head end had a slight rattle which went away when I tightened up the pill in the head. It wasn't loose enough to cause any problems - probably just shaken a lot in transit from HK to here. It didn't spend all that long in transit either, I just ordered the thing 12 days ago.

Head end

LED 

Yes, that's an XP-G

 

Beamshot - not my usual door top but in my very brightly lit office. About the same distance from the ceiling as my usual door top. As you can see, it is happy to tailstand.

Beamshot

 

The beam - pretty throwy for such a small reflector and an XP-G

Beam

 

It is a relatively small 18650 light.

Smallish

 

More once I've consumed a lot of cold remedies - my colleague at work has shed a whole lot of cold virus into the office air which I appear to have collected from her.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

SPAMBOT
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You don't get titanium for that price, and the only other, commonly used, thing that looks like titanium is anodized aluminum. If the threads are a lighter color than the body, then there is the answer to that. Haven't gotten mine yet, but stainless steel is supposed to not dissolve in a sodium hydroxide solution, right?

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Don
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Sodium hydroxide won't do it much good - but won't eat it the way it will aluminium.

Always add sodium hydroxide to water - NEVER add water to the crystals - you will not enjoy the result if you do. Alkali burns are nastier in general than acid burns. And tend to scar worse - best to avoid the possibility.

It's far too hard to be any conventional anodised aluminium - because of the fine ribbing it makes a pretty decent file. It is of comparable hardness to type 3 hard anodising - I managed to mark a Fenix E01 with it though the Fenix also managed to mark the fine ribbing. I'm positive it is no aluminium alloy I've ever come across, but I'm no metallurgist.

 

It is very grippy without shredding clothing. I just wet and soaped one hand then held the light in it. I was going to break the lanyard before it came out of my hand. It was knurled then finely grooved - I've not seen one like this before but it seems to work well.

 

With the cell in it that I'd been using to play with it at every opportunity today (i.e., not fully charged) I got these numbers on high. 278 lumens at switch on, 261 at 30 seconds and 256 at two minutes. Throw was 7810 lux at 1 metre.

Unlike the Yezl from yesterday it only gets mildly warm - so is probably better designed internally for use with low thermal conductivity materials - the Aurora SH-032 is from the same school of thermal design.


 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

pipopopo
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thanks for the review

looks like a solid light

had my own bad experience with using chemicals

how2
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Don wrote:

With the cell in it that I'd been using to play with it at every opportunity today (i.e., not fully charged) I got these numbers on high. 278 lumens at switch on, 261 at 30 seconds and 256 at two minutes. Throw was 7810 lux at 1 metre.

Unlike the Yezl from yesterday it only gets mildly warm - so is probably better designed internally for use with low thermal conductivity materials - the Aurora SH-032 is from the same school of thermal design.


Don which is brighter?

How amps do they both draw ?

Don
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The Yezl is a lot brighter. Like 50 lumens more at switch-on. Most I've seen from the Ultrafire is 1200mA on high. I'll try it with other cells and so on when I get around to a review. I really ought to add current draw to the spreadsheets.


The Yezl numbers are:

With a 14500

1380mA

620mA

190mA

 

With an eneloop

2380mA

1790mA

770mA

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

how2
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In your opinion which driver is more efficent?

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Nice Don , looking forward to the review 

 Always remember , the easiest thing in the world to do , is to expel hot air from your lungs and through some vocal chords ..
The resulting sound may , or may not be worth listening too ….

 

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Wouldn't the old fashion methode be good to analize the material? I mean, mesuring the mass of the body tube, by dunking it in a water container and then put in on a balance to get the exact weight.

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That's a very handsome light. I'd take a 1xAA version.

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Don
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Oldienea wrote:

Wouldn't the old fashion methode be good to analize the material? I mean, mesuring the mass of the body tube, by dunking it in a water container and then put in on a balance to get the exact weight.

 

That'd get me the density, but there are so many alloys out there I'd not be able to work out which one without chemical or spectroscopic testing. If there's any iron in it then it is an unusual looking stainless steel. It is just possible that the surface grooving that is causing the colour though it isn't that finely grooved.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Oldienea
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Don wrote:

Oldienea wrote:

Wouldn't the old fashion methode be good to analize the material? I mean, mesuring the mass of the body tube, by dunking it in a water container and then put in on a balance to get the exact weight.

 

That'd get me the density, but there are so many alloys out there I'd not be able to work out which one without chemical or spectroscopic testing. If there's any iron in it then it is an unusual looking stainless steel. It is just possible that the surface grooving that is causing the colour though it isn't that finely grooved.

If the density is known, I thought it would roughly give the direction to go. Steel, aluminum alloy or titanium.

titanium = 4,50 g/cm3

aluminium = 2,70 g/cm3

stainless steel = 7,80 g/cm³

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Now you just have to work out it's volume...time to take a bath Silly

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Pook wrote:

Now you just have to work out it's volume...time to take a bath Silly

 

I was thinking about mesuring its density before I made the caustic soda comment, but I first dismissed it as unfeasible. Thinking about it again, you actually only need to weigh and submerge the battery tube and not the sensitive head and clicky tail. Much better idea than using caustic chemicals! : )

 

One could also try testing its resistance at some flat part of its surface, aluminum oxide is a good insulator and should give an "OL" or similar read out while stainless steels should give a very low resistance reading.

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Don wrote:

The Yezl is a lot brighter. Like 50 lumens more at switch-on. Most I've seen from the Ultrafire is 1200mA on high. I'll try it with other cells and so on when I get around to a review. I really ought to add current draw to the spreadsheets.


The Yezl numbers are:

With a 14500

1380mA

620mA

190mA

 

With an eneloop

2380mA

1790mA

770mA

 

My Yezl B6 and B2S Pulled the same  kind of amps .On a 14500 that was run down to 3.71 volts  on  High it pulled  1.290A...med .950A  low.160 A... god forbid if I charge that battery up  to 4.20   but  3.7 volts is what the emitter wants anyway .

So are you saying this has super knurling ?

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                                  https://www.gty.org/

 

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Don
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SPAMBOT wrote:

Pook wrote:

Now you just have to work out it's volume...time to take a bath Silly

 

I was thinking about mesuring its density before I made the caustic soda comment, but I first dismissed it as unfeasible. Thinking about it again, you actually only need to weigh and submerge the battery tube and not the sensitive head and clicky tail. Much better idea than using caustic chemicals! : )

 

One could also try testing its resistance at some flat part of its surface, aluminum oxide is a good insulator and should give an "OL" or similar read out while stainless steels should give a very low resistance reading.

 

My guess is that density is a better bet. Al is a better conductor than Fe and it isn't that hard to penetrate a thin layer of anodising while trying to get a reliable contact. I'll need to go up into the loft and see if I have any measuring cylinders of appropriate size. Whatever the metal is, it has a very high magnetic permeability- which some steels do and many don't. What i mean by this is the NIB magnets I used to test were strongly attracted to the steel cased 18650 inside the light. This doesn't normally happen with Al lights though they tend to be thicker walled.

 

I certainly don't intend to strip out all the internals so only intend to measure the battery tube. Because of the fine grooving I'm going to have to boil it to shift any entrained air. A drop of two of a surfactant (AKA dish washing detergent) will also help here. But unless I can find a reasonably precise measuring cylinder with a large enough diameter (So the battery tube will fit in it) to measure the displaced water, there is no point in trying. Kitchen equipment will not be up to the job. Somewhere in the loft there is a 70 year old lab balance and weights for it - there may just be some volumetric equipment as well.

 

I'll take a look in the loft at the weekend unless anyone has access to non-destructive elemental analysis gear. I doubt anyone has such kit at home as it'd cost more than the house did.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Don
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Boaz wrote:

So are you saying this has super knurling ?

 

It isn't really knurling - it is a fine grooving over all of it - even the knurled portions have the fine grooving on them. Here's an 80x magnification picture of a part of the head.

80x magnified

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

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Don wrote:

I certainly don't intend to strip out all the internals so only intend to measure the battery tube. Because of the fine grooving I'm going to have to boil it to shift any entrained air. A drop of two of a surfactant (AKA dish washing detergent) will also help here. But unless I can find a reasonably precise measuring cylinder with a large enough diameter (So the battery tube will fit in it) to measure the displaced water, there is no point in trying. Kitchen equipment will not be up to the job. Somewhere in the loft there is a 70 year old lab balance and weights for it - there may just be some volumetric equipment as well.

 

I'll take a look in the loft at the weekend unless anyone has access to non-destructive elemental analysis gear. I doubt anyone has such kit at home as it'd cost more than the house did.

I have access to precision scales and a couple of these measuring cylinders in various sizes:

I'll test it as soon as it arrives, unless someone does it before it arrives.

I've found it to be very useful to keep some lab glassware around for everyday stuff : )

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I don't really have anything meaningful to contribute to this discussion but I'd like to get two things off my chest. Wink

1. I just showed this thread to my wife and she thinks we're all nuts. And that's coming from someone with a medical degree.

2. I officially love this forum. Big Smile Smile

Don
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Oxy Moron wrote:

I don't really have anything meaningful to contribute to this discussion but I'd like to get two things off my chest. Wink

1. I just showed this thread to my wife and she thinks we're all nuts. And that's coming from someone with a medical degree.

2. I officially love this forum. Big Smile Smile

 

Love it. I spend my days with psychiatrists several of whom want to get me on medication....

Ain't happening....

Most of my patients think I need meds....

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

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Don wrote:

This will be my last light for a while - just got an unexpected (and large) bill. So here are some pictures of what arrived this morning.

C303

Note the fine grooving - it gives a dark appearance, looking a bit like titanium. This picture has fairly accurate colours on my screen.

I assume that your car had a rather expensive repair bill. Sorry to hear about that!

After looking at the magnified pic that you took, I wonder if this was stamped or pressed in a mold from a metallic powder alloy and then kiln baked - as many parts in the automotive industry are these days.

I hope you feel better mate.

Don
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FlashPilot wrote:

I assume that your car had a rather expensive repair bill. Sorry to hear about that!

After looking at the magnified pic that you took, I wonder if this was stamped or pressed in a mold from a metallic powder alloy and then kiln baked - as many parts in the automotive industry are these days.

I hope you feel better mate.

 

Around $2000. Cylinder head is toast. Sad

I feel sorry for the Chinese who buy these motors - the factory got sold and moved to China. They get sold in China as the Roewe 750 . The 2.2 and 2.6 litre motors are fine but the 1800i motor is a POS by design. Guess which motor mine has?

Pity BMW in the brief years that they owned Rover didn't just substitute their well sorted 1800 fuel injected motor for Rover's sabotaged on the drawing board design. Not to mention the German made porous cylinder castings - they built what was designed - which is a pity. The diesel motor was a BMW engine - the petrol (gasoline) one wasn't.

 

I think given Chinese labour costs it's more likely that it was machined by hand rather then sintered and stamped. Sintering and stamping costs an enormous amount in hardware. Machinists are very, very cheap... 

Anywhere else on the planet (except maybe India) it'd be far cheaper to sinter and stamp it. I'd guess it is most likely hand machined. At what a machinist charges here they'd need to make about 8 of them an hour to cover their labour costs. I'd guess the factory makes that many of these per minute for the same labour cost.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

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Concerning the metal...

I've got access to a mass spectrometer at work, but that would entail vaporizing a small portion of the light - no good.

But...since the thermal conductivity of titanium is roughly one tenth that of a typical aluminum alloy, the easiest way to tell might be a simple "match"Wink

Don
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SPAMBOT wrote:

I've found it to be very useful to keep some lab glassware around for everyday stuff : )

So did I but it is nearly 30 years since I stopped being a chemist and I broke pretty much all of the stuff that got "borrowed" from the various places I worked in. The stuff in the loft belonged to my great uncle whose house this was - he bought the house outright in 1936 for 35% less than I spend a month on the mortgage payments for the same building. He was a chemist for the local soap manufacturer - "Soapy Ogstons".

The remaining gear ("gear" is the local junkie's euphemism for heroin BTW) in the loft is more than 70 years old so is calibrated in strange (To someone who thinks in SI units) units.

I can still remember trying to stay awake in all those sampling theory and methods lectures in 1979. Rather often, I failed to do so....

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Don
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Match wrote:

Concerning the metal...

I've got access to a mass spectrometer at work, but that would entail vaporizing a small portion of the light - no good.

I could easily file some of it off and send the filings to you. If those filings contain iron at all - it is probably stainless steel. All we really need here is a crude measure of the elements present - if it contains iron, nickel, carbon and chromium, it is some sort of stainless steel. If it contains stuff that isn't Fe, Ni, Cr, or C then it is likely something else. Problem is that the file is also made of steel so will contain shedloads of Fe. And quite a few other contaminants. If it contains Ti at all then the game changes.

Problem is, titanium is to be found in almost every rock on the planet. The white pigment in white paint is titanium dioxide.

Now think about how easy it is to contaminate samples.....

Serious analysis gets complicated very, very quickly. Mass specs are great - but one does have to think very, very hard about how the sample was obtained - and what might have contaminated it. And how. Once upon a time, I did this stuff for a living and it is quite amazing how many excuses you (What I mean here is "I") can come up with for the "wrong answer"

Problem with neutron activation analysis so beloved of CSI and similar programmes is that they aren't aware of the limitations of methods like that which will faithfully record every element the sample has ever been exposed to. Especially those that it met in the lab....

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Match
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Match wrote:

But...since the thermal conductivity of titanium is roughly one tenth that of a typical aluminum alloy, the easiest way to tell might be a simple "match"Wink

Gah!  I'm quoting myself...that has to be some sort of sin.  What I was trying to get at is just apply a little heat to one end of the battery tube, and if the other heats up fairly fast, then it's aluminum. Sorry if you had gotten that already from my previous post...long days at work are scrabbling the mind.

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Control

It's dark out there

 

C303 Low

Ultrafire C303 Low

 

C303 Medium

C303 Medium

 

C303 High

C303 High

 

Ultrafire C3 R5 single mode

Ultrafire C3 R5

 

Yezl S5 Low

Yezl S5 Low

 

Yezl S5 Medium

Yezl S5 Medium

 

Yezl S5 High

Yezl S5 High

 

And because I felt like it, my modded Mr.Lite J4 with an XM-L in it on high.

Mr.Lite J4 XM-L Mod High

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

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Got it today and I am 99% sure that it is anodized aluminum. Rear battery tube threads are of a lighter color and its surface is non-conductive. Will run density test soon.

Now with 100% all natural asbestos!

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Measurements done: 2.8g/cm^3, so it is an aluminum alloy then. Stainless f*n aluminum : ( The reflector looks like it could take an XM-L if you widen it just a little.

Now with 100% all natural asbestos!

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SPAMBOT wrote:

Measurements done: 2.8g/cm^3, so it is an aluminum alloy then. Stainless f*n aluminum : ( The reflector looks like it could take an XM-L if you widen it just a little.

Thanks SPAMBOT, that was the second disappointment in two days. Yell

I got this one 2 days ago. It is chrome plated iron and my magnets are competing to get at it.

Don
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Not all grades of stainless steel are non-magnetic. Though most of the good ones are.

Having used the C303 while walking the assistant last night, I've decided I like it.

Not so sure the assistant did - she was very reluctant to get up this morning.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

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