DinoDirect accepts Bitcoin

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ryansoh3
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DinoDirect accepts Bitcoin

Source: http://www.insideretail.asia/InsideRetailAsia/IRNews/DinoDirect-adds-pay...

Great, now they can really screw you over without PP protection! Big Smile

BLF ≠ B-grade Flashlight Forum

 

scaru
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leaftye wrote:

Bitcoin is damn near criminal in the USA.

Bitcoin is perfectly legal in the US (last I heard atleast). While some uses of it may be illegal, that doesn't mean bitcoin itself is...

Chloe
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Hmm… cease and desist?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jonmatonis/2013/06/23/bitcoin-foundation-rec...

Forbes wrote:
Directly following last month’s Bitcoin 2013 conference event in San Jose, CA that brought decent revenue into the state, California’s Department of Financial Institutions decided to issue a cease and desist warning to conference organizer Bitcoin Foundation for allegedly engaging in the business of money transmission without a license or proper authorization.

If found to be in violation of California Financial Code, penalties can be severe ranging from $1,000 to $2,500 per violation per day plus criminal prosecution which could result in fines and/or imprisonment. Additionally, it is a felony violation of federal law to engage in the business of money transmission without the appropriate state license or failure to register with the U.S. Treasury Department. Convictions under the federal statute are punishable by up to 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Their response:
http://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-foundation-issues-response-to-cease-and-...

Also relevant:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732437320457837461135112520...

WSJ wrote:
The U.S. is applying money-laundering rules to “virtual currencies,” amid growing concern that new forms of cash bought on the Internet are being used to fund illicit activities.