Understanding the difference between Linear, Buck, Boost and Direct Drive drivers

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lagman
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Understanding the difference between Linear, Buck, Boost and Direct Drive drivers

A long time ago I promised I would do a topic to explain to the interested layman the difference between Linear, Buck, Boost and Direct Drive drivers. Well, here it is.

Direct Drive


This is the simplest and cheapest design. As its name implies, it is a direct path to the LED, just like old incandescent flashlights. Sometimes there is a control chip and transistor to create modes (High, Low, Strobe, etc.) by rapidly switching ON and OFF the LED. That’s called PWM.
This is used by people who want to make extremely powerful flashlights that pull 6A or even more.
It is also used in cheap flashlights, but they add a resistor that will limit the current to a lower value. This is not good as the current will vary with the battery voltage. (Same as incandescent, but worst because of the LED)

In a direct drive flashlight, the battery voltage must be equal or higher than the LED voltage (An alkaline or NiMH battery can’t power a 3V LED using a direct drive driver).

Advantages:
Cheap

Disadvantages:
Current is varying greatly with battery voltage!
If a resistor is added to limit the current, the efficiency may be lower than a linear driver.
Voltage of the battery must be higher than the LED voltage (~3V) but not too much above. You can’t use this if you have multiple batteries in series.

Linear


This is the equivalent of a direct drive flashlight with a resistor to limit current… But smarter.
The only difference is that the resistor value is constantly adjusted to make a constant current. How is that possible? Well, that’s the job of the linear regulator. Most drivers use 7135 chips as linear regulators. Each chip will supply a constant 0.35A to the LED. A driver with four 7135 chips will supply a constant 1.4A to the LED.
This is also a very simple design. You can see the controller (that produces modes) surrounded by 7135 chips.

Don’t forget! Even though this is slightly smarter, it’s basically still a resistor to limit the current! This can never boost a lower voltage to give the LED the voltage it needs! That’s usually 3 – 3.3V.
This is the perfect driver for flashlights using single LED and single lithium battery. The battery has a voltage of 3 to 4.2V and the LED about 3 to 3.3V. So for most of the discharge the current will be constant.

Quick maths: What is the efficiency of a Linear driver?
Well, the linear driver has a variable resistance that burns off any excess power to reduce the voltage to 3V for the LED. That means that with a fully charged battery the efficiency will be lower than when the battery is discharged.
Efficiency=VLED/VBattery
Fully charged: Efficiency=3.3V/4.2V=78%
Half discharged: Efficiency=3.3V/3.7V=89%
Almost discharged: Efficiency=3.3V/3.3V =100% (Approximation, not taking into account all the parasitic resistances.)

When the battery voltage becomes too low, the linear driver will reduce the resistance to its minimum, to power the LED until the end (but dimmer).

“Why can’t I use a linear driver with two lithium batteries in series??”
Let’s do the maths:
Efficiency=3.3V/7.4V=45%!!! More power is wasted in the driver than fed to the LED! That will reduce battery life and the driver will overheat. On top of that the 7135 chip will fail above 6V…

Advantages:
Simple
Robust
Efficient if used in a single cell single LED configuration
Constant current for most of the discharge of the battery

Disadvantages:
Voltage of the battery must be higher than the LED voltage (~3V) but not too much above. You can’t use this if you have multiple Li-ion cells in series.

Buck

This is also called a step down driver. and is part of the SMPS (Switched Mode Power Supply) family.
It is easily recognizable thanks to the big inductor. Sometimes the inductor is black.

This is a more complicated design. I won’t go into details as it is well explained on Wikipedia .
In a nutshell, it uses an inductor and capacitor to step down a voltage. Compared to a linear (7135) driver, the Buck driver will have a fairly constant efficiency, even with a battery voltage much higher the LED voltage. It can be used to power a single LED with 2 or more batteries in series.

What about the efficiency? Well, it is usually between 75% and 90%. That depends on the quality of the design.

For info, this is wildly used in many devices (PC, TV, Smartphone, Tablet, etc.) because it is efficient.

Advantages:
Can be used with batteries that have a voltage much higher than the LED voltage. For example three lithium batteries in series will produce about 11V. In that case you need a Buck driver to drive an LED that needs ~3V.
Good efficiency
If well designed it can produce a true PWM less low mode. That’s good for sea sickness and for the LED efficiency. (More on that below)

Disadvantages:
Slightly more expensive
Voltage of the battery must be higher than the LED voltage (~3V).
Bulky

Boost

This is also called a step up driver. and is part of the SMPS (Switched Mode Power Supply) family.
It is easily recognizable thanks to the big inductor. Sometimes the inductor is black.

This is very similar the the Buck driver, but as its name implies, it will increase the voltage.
This is typically used in flashlights using one or two AA/AAA batteries. Two AA batteries in series will have a voltage varying between 2 and 3V. The LED needs ~3.3V so the voltage needs to be stepped up. There is no other solution!
I measured the efficiency of a single AA flashlight and typically found:
At the battery: Vin=1.2V ; Iin=2.2A
At the LED: Vled=3.2V ; Iled=0.35A

Let’s do some maths:
Efficiency=(Vled*Iled)/(Vin*Iin)=(3.2*0.35)/(1.2*2.2)=42%!!
That’s really bad! Well yes, but it’s hard to step up a voltage as low as 1.2V… The efficiency is better at 2.4V (2*AA). That means that if you choose a 2*AA flashlight you’ll get more than twice the runtime for the same brightness! That’s definitely something to consider.

It can also be used to power a string of LEDs (for example 3 LEDs in series will need about 10V) with a single lithium battery.

Advantages:
Can be used with batteries that have a voltage lower than the LED voltage.
If well designed it can produce a true PWM less low mode. That’s good for sea sickness and for the LED efficiency. (More on that below)

Disadvantages:
Slightly more expensive
Doesn’t work if the battery voltage is higher than the LED voltage.
Bulky

********************

What about PWM?

PWM means Pulse Width Modulation. It’s a way to control the brightness of a flashlight by rapidly switching it on and off. If it doesn’t switch rapidly enough (PWM frequency too low) it can be unpleasant to the eye. The picture above was taken while rapidly moving the flashlight to show the effect.
Something that is often overlooked is the fact that a light using PWM to make a low mode will be less efficient than one using a constant current. Why is that?

Well, as you can see above, the lumen output is not linearly dependant to the current. Let’s take an example:
Driver 1 is driving the LED at 2800mA at full mode. This driver also has a medium mode that is a duty cycle of 50%. That means that half of the time the LED is OFF and it’s half of time ON. We will get half the lumen of the full mode: about 500 lumen. On average it’ll consume 1400mA.
Driver 2 is also capable to drive at 2800mA. When in medium mode however, it uses a constant current of 1400mA. The average consumption is the same as Driver 1. The lumen output however will be about 600 lumen! That’s 20% more lumen.
All this to say that a flashlight that uses constant current on all modes will be more efficient!

*******

Conclusion
If you have a flashlight with a single LED single lithium battery then get a Linear driver.
If you have a flashlight with one or two NiMH/Alkaline batteries, then you need a Boost driver.
If your battery voltage is much higher than the LED voltage then get a Buck driver

*******

If you want to see the same thing explained by someone else, I invite you to read this.
Thank you for reading this. I hoped it was helpful to you and if it was please say thank you! Smile

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

Edited by: lagman on 08/28/2014 - 11:44
lagman
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This is a complicated subject. Even though I know how it works, I may have forgotten something or made mistakes. So please feel free to help me improve this topic! Smile

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Great effors, admittedly I only skimmed but I’ll read the entire thing start to finish later this evening.

One thing I see at first tho is your statement in the DD section

Quote:
In a direct drive flashlight, the battery voltage must be equal or higher than the LED voltage (An alkaline or NiMH battery can’t power an LED using a direct drive driver).

This is usually true however not a rule, if an LED with lower vF is used (and the driver components all accept ~1v input [most parts used have ~2.7v minimum]) then you can run that emitter from a lower power cell. For example I have an ATTiny 13V (low power version of 13A) MCU and use it to run a DD FET driver from a 1.8V lithium primary driving a red rebel LED. If you could find an led with a 1.2 or 1.5vf you could drive those with a DD setup.

 

Always remember SPC Joey Riley, KIA 11/24/14.

lagman
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Cereal_killer wrote:
Great effors, admittedly I only skimmed but I’ll read the entire thing start to finish later this evening.

One thing I see at first tho is your statement in the DD section

Quote:
In a direct drive flashlight, the battery voltage must be equal or higher than the LED voltage (An alkaline or NiMH battery can’t power an LED using a direct drive driver).

This is usually true however not a rule, if an LED with lower vF is used (and the driver components all accept ~1v input [most parts used have ~2.7v minimum]) then you can run that emitter from a lower power cell. For example I have an ATTiny 13V (low power version of 13A) MCU and use it to run a DD FET driver from a 1.8V lithium primary driving a red rebel LED. If you could find an led with a 1.2 or 1.5vf you could drive those with a DD setup.


True. I had in mind the Cree LEDs that need 3V…

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

Cereal_killer
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Looks like there is an issue in the boost section under advantages.

Quote:
text removed to remove incorrect info since fixed in OP

Note I’m not trying to say you wrong about anything, thanks for your efforts here, just trying to help you improve this for others.

Thanks for doing this!

 

Always remember SPC Joey Riley, KIA 11/24/14.

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Cereal_killer wrote:
Looks like there is an issue in the boost section under advantages.

Note I’m not trying to say you wrong about anything, thanks for your efforts here, just trying to help you improve this for others.

Thanks for doing this!

I’m not taking it the wrong way, you are helping me to produce something accurate and helpful to others! So thank you. Smile
I corrected the mistakes you pointed out.

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

lagman
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I feel like there is too much text. I just installed Matlab and KiCAD. I’ll try to make some nice graphs to explain the same things with less words… But not today. Smile

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Nice explanation, I think it is a good introduction for folks who are new to building flashlights, but I guess someone who is completely new to this should judge that Smile

Thanks for the write-up!

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I don’t, it’s a in-depth subject.

If you want to redo it with less text that’d be cool but I urge you leave everything already up. Make a new post with the shortened version, you should never remove reference material.

 

Always remember SPC Joey Riley, KIA 11/24/14.

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I did also do an article about it a couple of years ago (Date says 2010): http://lygte-info.dk/info/DriverTypes%20UK.html

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): http://lygte-info.dk/

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Thanks for the support guys! I see that somebody already linked to my topic so I’m happy. Smile

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

lagman
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HKJ wrote:

I did also do an article about it a couple of years ago (Date says 2010): http://lygte-info.dk/info/DriverTypes%20UK.html


I somehow never found this article on your website, even though I looked through it many times.
Anyway, I added a link to your article at the bottom of the OP.

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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lagman wrote:
HKJ wrote:

I did also do an article about it a couple of years ago (Date says 2010): http://lygte-info.dk/info/DriverTypes%20UK.html

I somehow never found this article on your website, even though I looked through it many times. Anyway, I added a link to your article at the bottom of the OP.

That article was only posted on CPF and I wanted to update it before posting it on my website, but has never gotten around to do that. Maybe you can use some ideas from it (I might still update it and post it sometime in the future).

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): http://lygte-info.dk/

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Lagman, you may consider going a little more in-depth on the PWM section and go into duty-cycle some.

 

Always remember SPC Joey Riley, KIA 11/24/14.

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Thanks for taking the time to put all this great information together.

Richie

lagman
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Cereal_killer wrote:
Lagman, you may consider going a little more in-depth on the PWM section and go into duty-cycle some.

I might do a separate in depth topic on this. I don’t want this to be so long that it scares newbies.

On a side note, I have a doubt about my title. Would it be better to say:
“Understanding the difference between Linear, Buck, Boost and Direct Drive drivers”
Instead of:
“Understand the difference between Linear, Buck, Boost and Direct Drive drivers”
?

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Yes, not really wrong as is but adding “ing” wouldn’t hurt, no ones going to complain tho.

*native speaker but not an English teacher or anything

 

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Cereal_killer wrote:
Yes, not really wrong as is but adding “ing” wouldn’t hurt, no ones going to complain tho.

*native speaker but not an English teacher or anything


So both are correct but the one with “ing” sounds better?

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Nice summary, i like it.

some of my actual experiments and reviews:
UF-T20 review and mod —->http://budgetlightforum.com/node/30186#node-30186
My EBRZM, over 1 million cd thrower—-> http://budgetlightforum.com/node/30274#node-30274
Ervin’s try (2nd. Annual BLF Scratch Made L

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applaud the topic: it’s an instruction, ‘do this’ (works fine in your title, as “you can do this”)
applauding the topic: it’s a description, ‘we are doing this” (also works fine in your title)

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hank wrote:
applaud the topic: it’s an instruction, ‘do this’ (works fine in your title, as “you can do this”)
applauding the topic: it’s a description, ‘we are doing this” (also works fine in your title)

Thank you! In that case I think I’ll put “Understanding” as it fits better what I intended to say.

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Nice, simple explanation.

When I was working with buck and boost circuits we simply called them DC-DC inverters which was basically just an oscillator (square or sawtooth) driving a toroidal transformer and operated at 20khz and above if I remember correctly. It’s been many, many years.
Higher frequencies allowed smaller components but usually lower efficiencies. That’s part of the buck/boost drivers used here.
You have to have AC, in one form or another, to transform voltage, so DC-DC converts DC to AC, changes voltage up or down, then converts to DC again.

The L/C portion in these drivers looks like part of the regulation circuit and operates at audible frequencies.
Your explanation is a lot easier to understand.

What we, the end user, care about is:
1) Voltage range usable for input.
2) Usable voltage and current out and stability.
3) Overall efficiencies at various voltage/current levels.
4) What driver to use in which situation.

That you describe very well.

Thanks for an excellent article.

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Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.

A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot.”
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Excellent Resource !
Thanks for this, it’s possibly the most valuable post in the last month. Smile

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Thanks, This is all new to me. Maybe this could be the first in a new sub-section of basic information for newbies. Now that I have a super nice light it might be good to understand more.

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Thanks for sharing this lagman. I know how to swap drivers but I really don’t understand how these drivers differ from one another – until I read this.

I was also somewhat ‘relieved’ because the driver of the BLF Starry Light flashlight I bought through group buy failed and I replaced it with a Nanjg 105c driver. I now feel safer using the light with 4 AA NiMH because its total voltage of 4.8 volts when fully charged is way below the 6 volt limit of the 7135 chip. Smile

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Nightbird95 wrote:
I was also somewhat 'relieved' because the driver of the BLF Starry Light flashlight I bought through group buy failed and I replaced it with a Nanjg 105c driver. I now feel safer using the light with 4 AA NiMH because its total voltage of 4.8 volts when fully charged is way below the 6 volt limit of the 7135 chip. :)

There is also a power and temperature limit on the 7135 chip and this is usual reached way before the 6 volt limit. Luckily the chip will protect itself and just reduce the current when it gets to hot.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): http://lygte-info.dk/

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HKJ wrote:

Nightbird95 wrote:
I was also somewhat ‘relieved’ because the driver of the BLF Starry Light flashlight I bought through group buy failed and I replaced it with a Nanjg 105c driver. I now feel safer using the light with 4 AA NiMH because its total voltage of 4.8 volts when fully charged is way below the 6 volt limit of the 7135 chip. Smile

There is also a power and temperature limit on the 7135 chip and this is usual reached way before the 6 volt limit. Luckily the chip will protect itself and just reduce the current when it gets to hot.


Basically you are wasting the power of one AA battery into the driver. Not the most efficient solution but it should work as long as the driver doesn’t overheat.
If you want to reduce heat losses you could use a dummy AA cell to reduce the voltage a bit. That would make your light a 3xAA light. Smile
The light should be as bright. Maybe that it will start reducing current a bit earlier at the end of discharge though. 7135 chips start reducing current about 0.2V above the LED voltage.

My English isn’t perfect but I’m trying to improve it. If you see something that doesn’t sound right or is just plain wrong, please feel free to point it out! Smile

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Cereal_killer wrote:
Great effors, admittedly I only skimmed but I’ll read the entire thing start to finish later this evening.

One thing I see at first tho is your statement in the DD section

Quote:
In a direct drive flashlight, the battery voltage must be equal or higher than the LED voltage (An alkaline or NiMH battery can’t power an LED using a direct drive driver).

This is usually true however not a rule, if an LED with lower vF is used (and the driver components all accept ~1v input [most parts used have ~2.7v minimum]) then you can run that emitter from a lower power cell. For example I have an ATTiny 13V (low power version of 13A) MCU and use it to run a DD FET driver from a 1.8V lithium primary driving a red rebel LED. If you could find an led with a 1.2 or 1.5vf you could drive those with a DD setup.


Same sorta issue here, referring to disadvantages of linear drivers:
Quote:
You can’t use this if you have multiple batteries in series.

You said above that the 7135 can’t take over 6v, but if the cells in series add up to 6v or less, couldn’t you use them? I’m thinking of Cr123, NimH, and alkaline cells, and there are lots of others. I suggest adding the designation Li-Ion thusly: …multiple Li-Ion cells in series. (I would also change “batteries” to “cells” to be correct in terminology.)

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DavidEF wrote:
You said above that the 7135 can't take over 6v, but if the cells in series add up to 6v or less, couldn't you use them? I'm thinking of Cr123, NimH, and alkaline cells, and there are lots of others. I suggest adding the designation *Li-Ion* thusly: ...multiple *Li-Ion* cells in series. (I would also change "batteries" to "cells" to be correct in terminology.)

Yes you can (Note CR123 are 3.2 volt).

Another thing to note when using the 7135 chip is that it is the chip that is limited to 6 volt, not the supply voltage for the circuit. This is used in some clever circuits that runs at higher voltage but uses a 7135 chip.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): http://lygte-info.dk/

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Nightbird95 wrote:
Thanks for sharing this lagman. I know how to swap drivers but I really don’t understand how these drivers differ from one another – until I read this.

I was also somewhat ‘relieved’ because the driver of the BLF Starry Light flashlight I bought through group buy failed and I replaced it with a Nanjg 105c driver. I now feel safer using the light with 4 AA NiMH because its total voltage of 4.8 volts when fully charged is way below the 6 volt limit of the 7135 chip. Smile

Just an FYI 4s NiMH is 5.3v fully charged.

 

Always remember SPC Joey Riley, KIA 11/24/14.

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HKJ wrote:

Nightbird95 wrote:
I was also somewhat ‘relieved’ because the driver of the BLF Starry Light flashlight I bought through group buy failed and I replaced it with a Nanjg 105c driver. I now feel safer using the light with 4 AA NiMH because its total voltage of 4.8 volts when fully charged is way below the 6 volt limit of the 7135 chip. Smile

There is also a power and temperature limit on the 7135 chip and this is usual reached way before the 6 volt limit. Luckily the chip will protect itself and just reduce the current when it gets to hot.

Thank you HKJ. The more I read the posts here in BLF, the more I realize that there are so much more to learn. Smile

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