What blade did you EDC today?

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xevious
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Macka17 wrote:
Xevious.

And that (unfortunately) is the way we all get experience.

Hopefully you won’t get caught again.


Yeah, I hear you. Sad thing is, this seller has 100% positive feedback and over 20,000 transactions. There must be a lot of naive buyers out there. This was his response: “we are really sorry about the inconvenience you had as these minor scratches should not be there, as far as those spots are concerned which are called ball spots are due to forging, Damascus steel is alloy or carbon and steel which forged into layers and some of the time it happens, this is true Damascus and not etched, we have been selling for over ten years and have more than 20000 feedback.”

But there’s no sign of Damascus pattern on the bald spots, in addition to no smooth transition there—it’s a sharp cut off. Plus, the back side of the exposed blade shows no pattern either (I looked up close with a 30x magnifier).

The seller (damascus007) listed the auction as no returns, but is offering me a 40% discount or a return. I’m going to return it. When there’s a return, there’s no feedback. So maybe that’s how he escapes the criticism (since if he refused, there would be negative feedback due to the deception).

I’d be curious to know if you’re able to look directly at his auctions and see for yourself if it’s possible to ascertain that his claims are true, or he’s peddling a massive scam.

Anyway, I appreciate all the details you provide, though overwhelming. I do realize that you have to pay many hundreds to get really good quality Damascus steel blades. My hope was to get a mediocre example that is at least the simulated Damascus steel by process, not by faux surface etching. But in the end… I think I’ll let go of this. The “white powder carbon steel” sounds more interesting and within a more practical budget. Where do you suggest looking on-line?

UPDATE: Interesting that the seller issued me a refund and stated “please cut the blade part right from the centre and see it’s genuine or not, we are not the trader it’s our family business for the last 40 years and we never sell anything fake and offer money back guarantee on our products.”

So I made another pass at examining the knife up close. I did find a consistency of pattern from one side of the blade, across the top, and to the other side. No “flawed” match of pattern. On the back end of the knife, what seemed devoid of pattern with the naked eye revealed that there is a pattern there. It’s just most of it was covered up from the grinding. But it was uneven, so I could see the layered steel pattern within it.

Thus… it looks like this may actually be some primitive, rough form of Damascus styled steel. And that bald spot was just an unlucky happenstance of unfolded steel in the mix. That’s what I can perceive from the examination. This seller must not have a very good command of the language, as he could have tried to explain things better.

UPDATE #2: Rather than wiping out everything here, I just wanted to point out that the seller gave me a full refund and told me to keep the knife (“too expensive to mail back”). With the cosmetic fault, he’d probably not be able to resell it anyway, so it wouldn’t make sense to send back as it is. I wonder if there’s something I could do to the back end of the knife to help get the rest of the Damascus lines to come through?

teacher
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@ Macka17 & Xevious

Devin Thomas / Among the best in the world (and there ain't many), absolutely top notch.

Brad Vice / Very, very good.

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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teacher
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Macka17 wrote:

…. (snip) …….

No2 White Powder Carbon Steel will give you a good blade
for a half sensible price.
And get the Tojiro, Iseya. etc From the Upper end of the lower/Mid range blades around $65/230. for your daily use.
…. (snip) …….

What is “No2 White Powder Carbon Steel”? I cannot find any information about it by that name.

Is the “White 2” I have listed below what you are referring to Macka17?

Thanks in advance…. Thumbs Up

White 2 Steel / Composition And Reference Data

Composition

  • C: 0.95-1.05;
  • Cr: 0.20-0.50;
  • Mn: 0.00-0.50;
  • Ni: 0.70-1.30;
  • P: 0.00-0.03;
  • S: 0.00-0.03;
  • Si: 0.00-0.35;

Maker: Takefu – Japan (JP)

Notes:
White 2 – Takefu steel.
According to them, Shiro2 is their most popular cutting steel. Shiro2 is not Shirogami 2 steel, even though sometimes Shirogami 2 is referred as Shiro2. Whenever you see the abbreviation, it is most likely referring to Hitachi Shirogami 2 steel, not Takefu Shiro2.

Cross-References:

  • none

Known Aliases:

  • Shiro2

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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xevious
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teacher wrote:
@ Macka17 & Xevious

Devin Thomas / Among the best in the world (and there ain't many), absolutely top notch.

Brad Vice / Very, very good.


Good to know, although price points are probably beyond my budget. Devin Thomas doesn’t have any current products listed for sale on his site. But wow, the gallery! I had no idea such Damascus steel patterns were possible. And that’s all from folding steel in specialized ways?
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Shirogami = white steel, aogami = blue steel also called white paper steel and blue paper steel based on the color of the paper they are (or were traditionally) wrapped in if i’m not wrong.
I have a small Spyderco Caly 3 super blue (aogami) and it’s a nice carbon steel (not stainless).

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xevious wrote:
teacher wrote:
@ Macka17 & Xevious

Devin Thomas / Among the best in the world (and there ain't many), absolutely top notch.

Brad Vice / Very, very good.

Good to know, although price points are probably beyond my budget. Devin Thomas doesn’t have any current products listed for sale on his site. But wow, the gallery! I had no idea such Damascus steel patterns were possible. And that’s all from folding steel in specialized ways?
Yeah, I think Devin Thomas mostly makes Damascus now to supply other makers. He is a master at Damascus. I thought you might find it interesting reading. Wink

Brad Vice’s shop is only about 20 miles from where I live.

Yep, using different steels forge welded together, folded, & folded some more. There are special methods used to create the different patterns.

The blade is then profiled, ground, heat treated, & sharpened.

Then it is all etched in a solution (mild acid) that reacts a bit differently with each steel used. That is what ‘brings out’ the pattern.

‘Touch up edge’ again after etching.

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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xevious
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teacher wrote:
Yeah, I think Devin Thomas mostly makes Damascus now to supply other makers. He is a master at Damascus. I thought you might find it interesting reading. Wink

Brad Vice’s shop is only about 20 miles from where I live.

Yep, using different steels forge welded together, folded, & folded some more. There are special methods used to create the different patterns.

The blade is then profiled, ground, heat treated, & sharpened.

Then it is all etched in a solution (mild acid) that reacts a bit differently with each steel used. That is what ‘brings out’ the pattern.

‘Touch up edge’ again after etching.


Yes indeed, I did! I’m fascinated. I had no idea such patterns could be achieved. I think I’ve found a “holy grail” for a future purchase. Will have to save up. Wink

That’s great you’re so close to Brad Vice’s shop. Does he accept customer walk-ins? That’d be great if you can get to know him and get to see his projects.

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Tally-ho wrote:
Shirogami = white steel, aogami = blue steel also called white paper steel and blue paper steel based on the color of the paper they are (or were traditionally) wrapped in if i’m not wrong.
I have a small Spyderco Caly 3 super blue (aogami) and it’s a nice carbon steel (not stainless).
Thanks Tally-ho, you hit the nail on the head. Thumbs Up …. Seems there are many other ‘terms’ that refer (or try to do so) to the same steels you referenced.
.
.

https://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/japanese_steel.htm

Japanese Blue and White Steel

The most widely available Japanese tool steel is manufactured in two forms: blue steel and white steel – named for the color of the wrapping paper used by the maker. Knowledge of these two form’s chemical content and tempering process allow the woodworker considering Japanese edge tools to make some tradeoff between hardness and toughness in the blade’s edge qualities. Hardness means the temper and content of the metal is such that the blade can be sharpened to a very fine degree but results in a somewhat brittle edge prone to chipping or crumbling. Toughness refers to the ability of the edge to avoid damage, and thus stay sharp longer.

Blue steel, or Aogami, has tungsten and chromium alloys added to the edge steel that make the hardening temperature less important, resulting in an edge that tends to be tougher, and thus stay sharp longer than white steel, while not taking on as fine an edge.

White steel, or Shirogami, contains fewer impurities and does not have the alloys added, so the hardening temperature range is very narrow. The blacksmith forging white steel has to be very skilled, but the result is tool steel that can be sharpened to a very fine, but more brittle, edge. Both forms are further broken down into grades based on the carbon content of the steel.

The better Japanese blades are laminated by hammer welding the edge steel onto an iron or softer carbon steel core, the actual process proprietary to each blacksmith. So, while there is science in the forging, hammering, heat treating and tempering processes, more than anything else the quality of the steel is the result of the care and skill of the blacksmith.

These are family run businesses that trace their lineage back to the edged weapon makers to the samurai and it takes 10-15 years at minimum to perfect the craft. Considering this learning curve, it is no small wonder that Japanese blue and white steel blades made by traditional methods are superior to machine manufactured products.

When trying to decide which blade to buy in a Japanese tool you should bear in mind the difference between blue steel, white steel, or the exemplary special process steels like Damascus is not one of quality.

There is a wide range of qualities available in both types of steel, and in the chisels made with from these steels. You can get acceptable toughness in very hard white steel chisels while taking advantage of that form’s ability to yield a very sharp edge; or you can get a quality blue steel blade that can be honed and sharpened very finely.

And of course it is quite easy to get neither hardness nor toughness in a sub-standard steel blade, blue or white, from an inept or sloppy manufacturer.

The chisels that we are offering are all at the higher end of what is available. It really boils down to the quality of the steel and the skill and care of the blacksmith. So, consider the edge qualities you want in a chisel and buy your Japanese edge tools from a trusted source. Either form of steel in a quality tool will yield outstanding results.

………..

White Steel vs Blue Steel

Simply put.

White steel is iron, carbon and not much else.
Blue steel is iron, carbon, tungsten and chromium.

White steel can and will take a finer, sharper edge, is generally tougher and more resilient, easier to work with during manufacture, less expensive and is, in most cases, the best steel for chisels, especially chisels that will be struck during use.

Blue steel will take a very good edge and keep an edge for longer than white steel can in planing and paring cuts. Because of the added alloying elements, it’s a little more brittle, is slightly more difficult to work with during manufacture, slightly more expensive and is ideal for planes and paring chisels.

This is not the be all and end all ‘rule’, as there is some cross over between the steels and a blue steel chisel can be a wonderful thing, as can a white steel plane stay sharp for a very long time. But as a general ‘rule’, this covers it with some exceptions for special circumstances.

The ‘sharpest edge’ doesn’t mean anything if you can’t actually get the edge there though…

Sooo, white steel is easier to sharpen and is ‘more likely’ to have a better edge put on it because of that. If you’re able to confidently put an excellent edge on white steel, then blue steel shouldn’t be a problem.

I hope that helps,

Stu.

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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teacher
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xevious wrote:

Yes indeed, I did! I’m fascinated. I had no idea such patterns could be achieved. I think I’ve found a “holy grail” for a future purchase. Will have to save up. Wink

That’s great you’re so close to Brad Vice’s shop. Does he accept customer walk-ins? That’d be great if you can get to know him and get to see his projects.

Good, I’m glad you found the reading interesting & enjoyed the pictures you found.

Yeah, it is pretty amazing the patterns they can acheive. I am awestruck with most of it. Wink

Brad Vices shop (Alabama Damascus) is only about a quarter mile from Bear & Son Cutlery . He supplies Bear with their Damascus in addition to supplying other outlets & his internet sales.

I do know Brad, having met him through a friend who is a Custom Knife maker. He is a nice & personable guy.

I have been to his shop when they were forging. It is pretty neat seeing those Damascus billets being forged on those huge power hammers. Shocked . Thumbs Up

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

 .................................. "Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast" ...................................

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xevious
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teacher wrote:
Blue steel, or Aogami, has tungsten and chromium alloys added to the edge steel that make the hardening temperature less important, resulting in an edge that tends to be tougher, and thus stay sharp longer than white steel, while not taking on as fine an edge.

White steel, or Shirogami, contains fewer impurities and does not have the alloys added, so the hardening temperature range is very narrow. The blacksmith forging white steel has to be very skilled, but the result is tool steel that can be sharpened to a very fine, but more brittle, edge. Both forms are further broken down into grades based on the carbon content of the steel.

teacher wrote:

White steel can and will take a finer, sharper edge, is generally tougher and more resilient, easier to work with during manufacture, less expensive and is, in most cases, the best steel for chisels, especially chisels that will be struck during use.

Blue steel will take a very good edge and keep an edge for longer than white steel can in planing and paring cuts. Because of the added alloying elements, it’s a little more brittle, is slightly more difficult to work with during manufacture, slightly more expensive and is ideal for planes and paring chisels.

Hey Stu, just a little confused here. In the first section it says white steel is more brittle, while blue steel is tougher. Yet in second section, says blue steel is more brittle… Question

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“Stu” must have been drinking. Big Smile
Those were copied & pasted from the site the links go to. I’d trust the first one. The second one was from a forum… so who knows. Sick . Wink

It could just be a ditterence of opinon or based on heat treat & Rockwell hardness differences or other variables.

It’s just like the search for the “Magical Search for the Super Steel” that tops all others…… Big Smile
The vast majority of people will not be able to tell the difference. Wink
Any good steel, if ground & heat treated properly; is going to cut very good. It is also much better to have a “lesser steel” properly heat treater than a ‘Super Steel’ that is not.

I have some Customs made of 1095 that are heat treated perfectly that out do some ‘Super Steels’ where the heat treat was not quite up to par. Close mind you, but it missed the mark.

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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teacher
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Here are some videos I thought you might find interesting….
.

A couple more about Alabama Damascus……

https://youtu.be/WnEMVyiRcYE

https://youtu.be/2wVDZgcz4NE
.

…..
This one by Ed Caffrey is about etching Damascus & is good. Very detailed though.

I am acquainted with Ed, he is a Bladesmith from Great Falls, Montana & a super nice guy. He makes his own Damascus as well as a great knife too. They ain’t cheap either….. Cash

Unfortunately, due to serious health issues Ed has had to take some time off for a while.

https://youtu.be/7NknW9Z7_pI
.

Caffrey Knives

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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xevious
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^ thanks @*teacher*, lots of good info in that. Thumbs Up

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xevious wrote:
^ thanks @*teacher*, lots of good info in that. Thumbs Up
Your welcome xevious, I enjoyed watching those & thought you might also. Take care… Beer

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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Macka17
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Thank’s Teacher. Tally Ho.
and all the rest of you.

As shown. it is a VERY interesting subject. with lots of variations.

Sorry I haven’t answered but I have gud days and bad days. Hmmm.

““Shirogami = white steel, aogami = blue steel also called white paper steel and blue paper steel based on the color of the paper they are (or were traditionally) wrapped in if i’m not wrong.”“

As I said in beginning. Steels do vary.
BUT… It’s the experience and skills of smith that makes any what it is.
Good steel/bad blade. or Cheaper steel Good blade.

Hocho, and several others will give all the info you need.

And. Realistically.
Hocho usually the cheaper for same blades. It does vary with specials though.

In your price range. Iseya 33 damascus. 6 in Petty.
VERY nice blade I love mine. $75 now.
Tojiro DP 3 layer VG10. 7in Santoku. $91
A LOT of pro’s use it and it’s smaller mate around the world.
Sharpens well. Cuts well and stainless.
Iseya 33 dam, same knife different tip shape. $125
A little dearer. but very pretty.
The smooth damascus ARE prettier than the hammered but.
Your eyes.

I’m only going on blades “I’ve” owned personally, Have Used and felt a lot more.
Plus multiple Mates have many others.

Coupla grand a blade is nothing if you appreciate such. But I wasn’t a good enough cutter , handler. To Appreciate such. I Just appreciated at my skill?? level. (I’d fuck a good one real quick.)

$200ish will buy you a NIIIce coupla blades in your financial level.
and they soooo smooth cutting. Learn to hold a knife and present BACKS of knuckles only.
NO TIPS>of pinkies.

But get a bottle of Single Malt. coupla bars of dark chocolate.
and settle in for a loooong read. plus many YouTube video’s.
You are entering a different world compared to Western blades.

Anther little carbon NON stainless I play with. “Tojiro Japanese-Style Shirogami White Steel Aji-Kiri 105mm. Around $65 US on sale. plus freight from Japan.

6 in Petty $73.

Hammered 7in Santoku $125. But I reckon their 7in smooth at $133 is a nicer blade??.
Here we go. Choices again.
and these just the cheaper models. My level.
wait till you see some of the real ones.. (You’ll crack a hard just perusing them (chuckle)

Have fun.

Then go back to the folders for a little wallet relief hey.

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Macka17 wrote:
Learn to hold a knife and present BACKS of knuckles only. NO TIPS>of pinkies.

Wait… what?

Macka17 wrote:
But get a bottle of Single Malt. coupla bars of dark chocolate.

Hmm, I like the way you think. Dark b33r instead of scotch for me, though. I’ve been trying various types of “hard” liquor… to me it all tastes like jet-A.

Macka17 wrote:
and settle in for a loooong read. plus many YouTube video’s.

You are entering a different world compared to Western blades.

Unno, all I got are my trusty Wüsthof sudoku blade and Choinese cleaver to keep me busy. No idea if it’s made of that origami metal or the other one. It just works.

I’d probably pick up something made from Chinese Mystery Metal, with my luck.

And stiiiiiiiiiill waiting for my go,comma blades…

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

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xevious wrote:

UPDATE #2: Rather than wiping out everything here, I just wanted to point out that the seller gave me a full refund and told me to keep the knife (“too expensive to mail back”). With the cosmetic fault, he’d probably not be able to resell it anyway, so it wouldn’t make sense to send back as it is. I wonder if there’s something I could do to the back end of the knife to help get the rest of the Damascus lines to come through?
Post a picture of the complete knife, both sides.
Then post a picture(s) of the “backend of the knife” you are referring to.

Yes, there is something you can do to bring out the pattern. Post those pictures so I can see where you are talking about & we’ll come up with a plan. Wink

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

 .................................. "Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast" ...................................

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teacher
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Macka17 wrote:
Thank’s Teacher. Tally Ho.
and all the rest of you.

As shown. it is a VERY interesting subject. with lots of variations.

Sorry I haven’t answered but I have gud days and bad days. Hmmm.

““Shirogami = white steel, aogami = blue steel also called white paper steel and blue paper steel based on the color of the paper they are (or were traditionally) wrapped in if i’m not wrong.”“

As I said in beginning. Steels do vary.
BUT… It’s the experience and skills of smith that makes any what it is.
Good steel/bad blade. or Cheaper steel Good blade.
…… _(snip) ………..

Sure thing mate, and thank you too! Your right, it is a very interesting subject with many variations. And, as you said; the skills of the maker are crucial in getting the best out of whichever steel is used. Thumbs Up
Hope you are feeling better my friend…. we missed you. Beer

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xevious
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teacher wrote:
xevious wrote:

UPDATE #2: Rather than wiping out everything here, I just wanted to point out that the seller gave me a full refund and told me to keep the knife (“too expensive to mail back”). With the cosmetic fault, he’d probably not be able to resell it anyway, so it wouldn’t make sense to send back as it is. I wonder if there’s something I could do to the back end of the knife to help get the rest of the Damascus lines to come through?
Post a picture of the complete knife, both sides.
Then post a picture(s) of the “backend of the knife” you are referring to.

Yes, there is something you can do to bring out the pattern. Post those pictures so I can see where you are talking about & we’ll come up with a plan. Wink


Thanks! Here’s some photos. I put 1440 × 1080 embedded and then linked to full original resolution. Not sure how much this will help. That “bald spot” I mentioned appears to be a flaw in the steel folding, whereby there are no Damascus lines to come through. My thought was that it might be interesting to see if the Damascus lines could be revealed on the back end of the knife, but my gut feeling is that it may be too much trouble than it is worth.


Original


Original


^ NOTE — my embedded annotation is no longer valid, as it was later determined that this is not an applique after all. What appears to account for the abrupt end to the pattern is a lump of unfolded steel in the mix.

What’s interesting is that in one of the photos, with the lighting angle, you can see the unintentional “groove” in the surface, revealing that folded steel was indeed used for the composition.

I honed the knife with a good quality honing steel. It brought the edge to true fairly well, but it’s clear the edge angle is rather steep… which means it’s not all that feasible to get a very sharp edge. I’d need to grind it down. I’ve never actually done that in a “good way,” as in my naive days before I knew about honing, I’d use those sharpeners that would mercilessly strip off material. As I understand it now, there are times when it is necessary like removing deep nicks and pitting from the edge first and then follow up with honing. I’m aware that to do it right you need a number of different grades of sharpening stones. I plan to learn the technique eventually, as I have a couple of old candidate knives that are damaged.

Anyway, this cheap Damascus knife cuts OK. I was able to slice a tomato with it and didn’t squish the fruit. It’s a rather heavy knife (which I expect reveals the low cost steel) and perhaps that weight helps with the cutting. It’s only a little larger than my Calphalon Santoku, which is unquestionably a superior knife (it’s easy to paper slice). When looking at the blade edge with a magnifier, it’s so striking to see the edge angle differences. So I really won’t be using this cheap knife for much cutlery work. Only a conversation piece, really.

Macka17
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Teacher.

Thank’s for above amendment of my “description?
of different steel blends. Old age Maybe.
and as you see here. LOTS of peoples know lots of things about “lots of things”.
Just a case of bringing the interest out hey.

Apart from the current flu annoyance.
I’ve had this for 30 yrs or more. (June 1990)
I ALWAYS come good again. eventually, It’s ALL in the drugs mate.
If they ever tested me for Opiates I’d blow the top off the machine.
But b4 this electronic implant in my Spinal Chord in neck.
I was on 4 times as much.
Lived permanently in a floating cloud.
Very rarely came down, and when I did.
just wanted to get back up there quick.
It farkin’ hurt 24/7.
Anybody that knows any family or friends with “chronic pain”
anywhere in body.
Get them to get in touch or read up on net. “NEVRO
Spinal implants.
THIS ONE. Actually works. with 85% of us.
You have several months of FREE (in Aust anyway) trials first.

MINE 100% NIL pain. around 94% of the time. and when it hic-cups. I just reset on a different cycle for a while.
I’ve gone from a miserable, whinging, full of pain, grump.
to a (almost) normal. Happy. Smiling. Old fart.

Coupla things.
That blade will never be a fine slicer/cutter. Without lots of grinding/
NOT worth it.

I’d take edge back about 1\4 in,and take remove the shoulder too.
with Stones/diamond plates.
and use as a heavy cutter.
Those Damascus lines are Hmmm.
That blade would have to taper from hilt to tip. to give them In normal folded\layered steel. They going the wrong way.
Be very time consuming to layer that lot in the right way
for that pattern.
Any “bringing out” (That’s available) can be done with acid dipping.

PS. You can not have solid blocks of steel showing in “folded layers of metal. Sorry mate.

Yrs ago I played with forging Rail Spikes. Layers of steel hammered into one etc.
Basically All I got was tired arms\shoulders.
Didn’t know enough about steel consistency’s.
(too dumb yes)
Best I had were power saw blades and the aforementioned Rail spikes.
They made GREAT Axe heads.

Lightbringer..

““Macka17 wrote: Learn to hold a knife and present BACKS of knuckles only. NO TIPS>of pinkies.

Wait… what?”“ ———————————-

Cutting food. Read …. Read. (chuckle)

Hold ALL foods you cutting. with finger TIPS folded back.
ALL OF THEM. You wouldn’t be the first to tip the little one.
Just presenting first knuckle and flat backs of fingers for blade to slide up and down against.
Those things ARE sharp.

Holding.
If you hold the knife.in hand. Handle in last 3 pinkies (diddums)
Then thumb and first finger gripping top SIDES of blade.
You will find that a much better. controlling grip (to most)
is established. Especially for slicing. Try it.
Have fun hey.

xevious
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Macka17 wrote:
Coupla things.
That blade will never be a fine slicer/cutter. Without lots of grinding/
NOT worth it.

I’d take edge back about 1\4 in,and take remove the shoulder too.
with Stones/diamond plates.
and use as a heavy cutter.
Those Damascus lines are Hmmm.
That blade would have to taper from hilt to tip. to give them In normal folded\layered steel. They going the wrong way.
Be very time consuming to layer that lot in the right way
for that pattern.
Any “bringing out” (That’s available) can be done with acid dipping.


Thanks for weighing in on this, Mack. I had a feeling it wasn’t much of a cause. I was actually tempted to compensate the seller a little for having given me a full refund, but given the sore lack of quality I won’t do it. I can’t leave feedback, because of the refund. But this just goes to show you, the scam continues. This is junk “Damascus” and he’s getting positive feedback for it. So very unethical. But that’s the game of the swindler—a fool and his money are soon parted. It keeps repeating and repeating. Some people need to learn the hard way, but sadly that means a swindler profits.

Yeah, I’m not going to waste my time with this. I can’t even give it away, let alone sell it. Just wouldn’t be right. Anyway, it’ll be a good test knife for practicing sharpening.

teacher
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@ xevious

Ok, I see where you are referring to…. the end in front of the handle

Dip a Q-tip in some vinegar & rub it on the end part. See if that brings out the pattern. Keep it off the rest of the blade best as possible.

Let me know. I think that should do it. If not… we’ll go to plan B. Wink
.


.

I’m sending you a PM….. Thumbs Up

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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Macka17
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Take that bevel up around another 1\4 in. then grind that shoulder off. Making it even (ish) taper from cutting edge to back of blade
it’s solid enough that if you put a reasonable edge to it.
A good cleaver. chopper. Heavy cutting blade it’ll make.
It’s long enuff, and heavy enuf to do so.
If NOT tip heavy. maybe take a slice off top centre to rear sect of spine to balance it so.

My Mitchel Engineering (Meatworks commercial supplier here in AUS).
does some similar. Mine. a good. basic steel. Nicely TIP heavy, holds a good sharp edge. and chops through chuck bones like they not there.
And thick. Crusty Dark bread with grains. Like soft butter.

Cost me $11 AUD. now $17 del.
Cheap and nasty but very good 440c steel, (Don’t ever knock it)
It was a top steel for yrs. Still is. Depending who works it.
And professional meatworkers use their steel every day on carcasses
with no problem.

As the steel depends on heat treatment.
The “cutting” edges depend on loong experiences with the stones and steels for best angles. son in law was a pro boner for 40 yrs.
I used to do some boning yrs ago Just to get that experience, as I was semi-Pro shooting for Roo’s and Buff’s in the top End.

Croc’s (shhhhhh) too. on the side. 6 to 7ft nose to tail got a UNSlitted skin a Grand each Cash… Handbag material. But soooo eay to slice through. as the pressure you had to use to separate skin from fat.
one slice. Value gone. Shooting those B’s was the best fun though.
Bang. Tween the eye triangle for the brain,
Then blast forward in tinny in dark with grapnels ready.
As the red eye closed and it disappeared in the dark
and the ballast stones they stored in belly took them straight down.

ALl blades. even $3 Chinese “what the F is that” things.
ARE good for something. Utilise it.

xevious
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Hey Macka17, sorry to hear about your chronic pain woes. Sounds like things are much better now after that spinal implant. But man, must have been tough to get off those opioids. In USA we have a raging epidemic of people getting dangerously hooked on them.

I’m sending Teacher the knife to keep (just minor compensation) so he can play with it and see about improving the edge. I just don’t have that talent (yet…).

Not sure if there’s any rule of thumb about weight, but this one weighs in at 11.75 oz, about 330 gm. The wood is quite decent for the price. I’d have kept it if the blade edge angle was more shallow, so that it would be easier to achieve and maintain a nicely sharp edge.

maba
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TS TS25 Big Smile

Macka17
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He’ll probably belt grind it down then reset a cutting angle.
That “shoulder” has to go though.
Regarding the Poppy’s (chuckle)
I’m NOT off them. Just reduced.
Still have a 25/5 Shoulder Fenpatch every 3 days.
$150 ea on open market apparently….
As if I would.
Plus I take a 5mg Targin every Morn. or a 10mg if going to do some work.

Pre the implant I was on 50+ mg Targin every day. Plus the Fenpatch 25 Patch.
and I carry a card of Endone “lollies” for the extra sore times.

NOT off. Just reduced, but makes me human….
After 30+ yrs, I’d have to be a “controlled” druggie.
But the specialists that control my input say NOT so..
Who would know hey.

My pain gone 100% most of time. I’m not gonna whinge about anything.
Just thankful.

xevious
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Macka17 wrote:
He’ll probably belt grind it down then reset a cutting angle.
That “shoulder” has to go though.
Regarding the Poppy’s (chuckle)
I’m NOT off them. Just reduced.
Still have a 25/5 Shoulder Fenpatch every 3 days.
$150 ea on open market apparently….
As if I would.
Plus I take a 5mg Targin every Morn. or a 10mg if going to do some work.

Pre the implant I was on 50+ mg Targin every day. Plus the Fenpatch 25 Patch.
and I carry a card of Endone “lollies” for the extra sore times.

NOT off. Just reduced, but makes me human….
After 30+ yrs, I’d have to be a “controlled” druggie.
But the specialists that control my input say NOT so..
Who would know hey.

My pain gone 100% most of time. I’m not gonna whinge about anything.
Just thankful.


Yep, makes sense. It’s on the way to him—he should have it by Friday, I expect.

Yikes, what a cocktail of meds and pain killers. Anyway, what matters most is that most of the pain is under control and rarely felt, so you can live your life! Just sorry you’re having to deal with these outrageous drug prices. It’s criminal… and our government keeps letting us down. Present situation? They’re profiting even more with this administration. That’s cause people like “the turtle” are in bed with them.

Btw, I got that Damascus folder. You were right — very sweet thing for the price! The action seems to be intentionally “notchy”, that I at first thought was grit. But everything is machined well. Seems to be real Damascus type steel. Very, very clean pattern with nice randomness. The rose wood handles are gorgeous. Really can’t beat it.

Macka17
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Just don’t ever use small. Smooth scales/slim blade knives on blood, wet etc. they alright for cleaning nails,
and eating an apple etc.
It’s Ohhhh So easy to slip and slice pinkies real good.

I was a deckie on North Sea Trawlers of NE Coast of UK back in mid ’50’s.
we gutted every cod in those days to get all meat weight in baskets and no offal (better price at quay).
My left coupla pinkies have a few slices in them from when you can’t feel (frozen)and fish slime everywhere.

Over 3 1\2 to 3 3\4in. Go to fixed blade.
And me. over 5in fixed Maartiini. I use a Balanced
Very sharp, hand axe.
Then chainsaw.
Respect your own flesh and bone. They only come around once.
I dropped a 12\14in Redgum once with 6 Brenecke solids from my Remington Pump and coupla doz belts with my axe.
to control fall. Just to experiment.
Tree had to go.. Blocking new trail in private forest.

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Benchmade Axis along with a few other items I have on me every day.

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