Mod - GarryBunk's SecurityIng HD-016 (It's Finally Done!) - Pic Heavy

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ImA4Wheelr
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Mod - GarryBunk's SecurityIng HD-016 (It's Finally Done!) - Pic Heavy

NOTE: This OP has been completely redone.  All the earlier mods done to the light that didn't end up in the final build has been removed.

GarryBunk had a concept the stared with the SecurityIng HD-016.  He wanted both beams (Flood & Flow) to work simultaneously and to have various levels of brightness.  He also wanted the light to be hard to accidentally turn off for safety purposes.  He only wanted Strobe Mode accessible from Off Mode, again for safety purposes.  Additionally, his concept included the following:

  • Modes that approximate: Low (10%-15%), Medium (40%), High (75%), Turbo (100%).
  • Upgrade to XM-L2 T5 5B1 emitters on Noctigons.
  • Increase output to around 2.4 amps per emitter.
  • Have automatic thermal protection.
  • Have voltage indicator lights and low voltage protection.
  • Beef up the thermal path for the emitters.

 Ledoman has a review of the UniqueFire version of this light here.  Here is a link (Post 16) to describe the UI of the KD2 MCU.


Driver:

Here is a Circuit diagram of stock driver.  Some good driver pics are in Post 16.

Initially, the Attiny13a was to be swapped in and mods were made for it.  Limitations, however, were discovered that would not let the light realize all of Garry's desired functionality.  Luckily, the KD2 light came out with a 10 Step programmable driver.  Garry requested KD make the driver available separately from the light.  Last I checked it was $8.

It is a pretty cool driver.   Programmable levels, thermal and low voltage protection, and indicator lights basically cover all the features Garry wanted.  I really like how it smoothly ramps to the next level. 

I've spent a good amount of time trying to map out the circuits on the KD driver so that I can determine what needs to be done to transplant the MCU to to the HD-016.  It's been frustratingly difficult due the black masking and traces running under components.  I finally had to resort to sacrificing the KD driver by sanding off the masking.

It was a pretty involved process as it required the MCU, EEPROM chip, capacitor, thermistor, Indicator LED's, and some resistors be transplanted.  Another complexity is that the pin outs are completely different and almost every pin of the KD's MCU is used.  There are also some other circuit differences that  had to be addressed.

Due to the large number of wires that would be needed, air wiring the MCU could not be accomplished. 

I had to learn how to design pcb's in order to procure an MCU adapter.

Designed and ordered and MCU adapter board.  It took a lot of time as I struggled with learning Eagle and building the parts.  Parts represent the MCU’s.  I could not find any already made as I don’t know what MCU’s these are.  I ended up having to manually make a mirror image of the part the represents the HD MCU and then use the Eagle Mirror command to get it on the bottom side of the board.   When Eagle did that, it put the pins in the proper spots (not mirror image).  Special thanks to Halo..., Mike C, and wight for the tips they provided.

Here is an idea of what they have under the solder mask. 

Top and bottom combined, Top (Red), and Bottom views:

Here is where the adapter was be installed:

In order to facilitate a more secure, vibration tolerant installation, this OSH Park PIC/Attiny adapter developed by BLF Member wight here will be used to hold the EEPROM chip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sanded off the back and kapton taped:

Abbreviated wiring diagram between MCU and EEPROM:

Positioned and install on main driver board:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The 2 buck drivers on the driver had problems with failing components.  I believe this is due to the small size of the components and no thermal path to the body.  We finally opted to go linear regulation.  This will make the light more efficient and extend usable run time.  Time under regulation will likely be shorter though.  Seven AMC 7135's were need to meet Garry's desired max output.  Needed a way to heat sink them as more wattage will be flowing through them for 2S emitters.

Used on of these 12 AMC slave boards for surface mounted vibration tolerance. Sandwiched in copper to get heat to the body.

 


 

Indicator LED's had to be reversed and circuit modified as polarity feed went from positive to negative with the MCU swap.  Also, swapped in the Red and Yellow LED's from the KD2 driver.  Garry wanted switch on the right, Green on bottom and Red on top.  So lables on the board do not match the actual emitter positions.

 Potted entire driver in Fujik primarily to deal with vibration.  First injected the Fujik under the EEPROM chip board and under all the wires.  Then over those items.  Coated the body with mineral oil as a release agent and then installed driver.  Then added more Fujik to get a more direct thermal path to the body (to speed up thermal protection response).  I expected the Fujik to settle itself and level out flat.  Oh well.  Not pretty, but it should do the job fine.







Emitter thermal path:

Two issues are driving the choice in thermal path enhancement as follows:

  • The 20mm pills are not press fit like the X2.  They sit in a nice pocket, but there is a small gap.  So primary contact is on the bottom of the pill in a thin ledge around the permittee of the pill.
  • The pills and aluminum bases are only .082" thick.  The Noctigon and SinkPad bases currently available are .065" thick.  Combined with the pill, at total thickness of .12" will result.  This means that either the copper base or pill have to be sanded thinner.  With only a 16mm base, making the base thinner is not an attractive option to me.
  • There is limited space for adding surface contact with the host.

Although Garry is only increasing current to 2.4 amps per emitter, the thermal path is important due to the small size of the host and the chance that Garry may eventually decide to increase current further.  It is clear, therefore, that copper is called for.  The pills will be tossed (returned to Garry with stock aluminum bases and emitters).  The following will be installed.

Here is how 20mm Noctigons fit before reflowing to copper press fit disk.  One is upside down to enhance visibility.  Note the narrow ledge they rest on and the gap around the parameter. 

Back view.  Here is the space behind the emitters.  The driver just about butts up against the bottom of the cutout.

Here are some of the copper pieces that will be reflowed directly into the light.  Total number of pieces will be 14 to 16.  Each is designed to be light press fit in there respective sections of the body.  Each is design to fit the length of the section of the body they will be in.  There will be 2 more collar shaped pieces that will fit between the 7135 piece and the driver.  The collars that fit around the Noctigons will extend up to the top of the reflectors.  The tall one is for the throwy reflector and the shallow one is for the floody reflector.

Floody Emitter:

  • 20mm Noctigon - This will fit the same as the pills diameter wise. .65" of height used, less fine sanding to lap and remove non-copper layers on the bottom of the base.
  • Copper disk that will be reflowed to the Notigon and cut to lightly press fit into host.  .21" of height used, less fine sanding to lap.
  • Copper ring about .45" tall under the above to provide more surface contact with host.  It will be a unique size.  So it will actually be a split ring with spring pressure to make tight to host walls.  Will be reflowed to the above.

Throwy Emitter:

  • 20mm Noctigon - This will fit the same as the pills diameter wise. .65" of height used, less fine sanding to lap and remove none copper layers on the bottom of the base.
  • Copper disk that will be reflowed to the Notigon and cut to lightly press fit into host.  .21" of height used, less fine sanding to lap.
  • .71" copper disk under the above cut to be a light press fit to the host.  Will be reflowed to the above.
  • Copper ring about .45" tall over the above to provide more surface contact with host.  It will be a unique size.  So it will actually be a split ring with spring pressure to make tight to host walls.

The above will line much of the interior of the light with copper.

Front view smallest diameter LED shelves.  Left is the thick one that is a copper sleeve and aluminum rod for floody emitter.  Right is thick copper disk for throwy emitter.

Next level of LED shelves disks (Not yet fully lapped in picture) and front copper sleeves that the Noctigons will press fit into.  These disks are wider diameter but thinner to have right LED height.

Back view of the smallest diameter LED shelves.

Back figure 8 plate goes behind smallest diameter LED shelves.

Back copper sleeves that AMC7135's and leads will occupy.

AMC7135 plate.

Sanded off non-copper coating from back of the Noctigons and lapped flat.  The Noctigon's that Garry sent me had the pads too close to the edge.  Part way to filing to fit in the copper tubes, I realized the pads were going to hit the copper sleeve.  So I swapped with some Noctigons I had around.

Noct's in place with copper sleeves.  Taking the heat vertical.  Second picture is back of the pill with sleeves for 7135's.

Reflowed into place and holes for leads drilled out:

 

Body:

A cable gland was need to secure and provide water resistance for the new 20ga 5.4mm Male to Female Extension Cable that Garry supplied.  Cable gland needed modification.  Need more reach to get inside nut threaded deeply enough.  So machined off some of the fixed hex "nut".  Also internal nut was too big to fit in light.  So filed down and added grooves for Fujik to grab.  Also notched top of inside edge to grab the Fujik to help prevent comming loose.  Cable gland on top is modified, bottom is stock.

Back plate had to be modded to accommodate the cable gland.  This was challenging as the original hole was close to the edge and had a odd shaped counter sink for the original cable.  So had to carefully migrate the hole inward and upward.  Some of the original counter sink was remaining afterwords.  Had to make a new counter sink for o-ring to create a water tight surface.  All done be hand and with care. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Driver had to be filed to accommodate larger cable connector:

 

It is very secure and seems like it will be very durable.

Approximate average emitter current (in amps) at the 3 preset levels:

L  0.23

M  1.37

H  2.48

Emitter Current at the 10 customizable levels:

01  .08

02  0.23

03  0.41

04  0.61

05  0.85

06  1.09

07  1.37

08  1.66

09  2.00

10  2.48

Difference between "tail cap" amps and emitter amp is very small (measure around 8 volts input).  Ranged from  04 to .07 amps.

 

Final Assembly:

Wanted long enough wires so that Garry could add/subtract AMC7135's (or even add a MOSFET).  This created a challenge in packing into the light.

 

Leads connected before clean up.  It's a real pain to solder when Noct's are reflowed into an integrated copper pill down in a narrow well.  The joints don't look pretty but they are solid, good connections.  They got ugly when I tried to build up the joints.

Getting the lens O-rings in place was a real PITA.  There is a small track the o-rings fit in that is on the top of the reflector.  The lens is the wall of the other side of the track.  The ledge on the top of the reflector is to small to hold the oring by itself and the o-ring is small and can not push in to place by just pushing down on the lens.  I finally used a dull wooden toothpick to push it down into place.  Was not something I ever want to redo.  I recommend Garry not take out the reflectors unless he wants a fun morning long project.

Garry provided AR coated lenses that he got from KD:

 

Performance:

All in all it has turned out to be a very nice light.  Garry had a nice concept that combined good features that are not available in any single budget bike light.   The UI is great and the beam is nicely balanced.  It is quite wide and fairly even.  It does seem like an excellent beam pattern for biking.  The tint of the emitters Garry selected are excellent in my opinion.

The AR-coated lenses resulted in some artifacts, but they are minor and not noticeable in usage.  Artifacts are the price to pay for more output.  I have always had this happen when I switch to A/R-coated lenses.  I think it is because there is less light bouncing back off the lens to the reflector and then back out.  Thus, giving non-AR coated lenses a smoother beam than AR-coated lenses.

At room temperature (78 degrees Fahrenheit) flat on paper towels with no air movement, the light takes about 6 minutes for thermal protection to kick in at 166 degrees Fahrenheit.   It steps down to .26 amps.  The light automatically kicks back into high at around 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

At Medium Mode (no air circulation, room temp), the light gets too hot to touch, but does not reach thermal step down temperature.

The difference between current to the emitters and current consumption is very close when measured at 7.8 volts.  Efficiency was in the upper nineties.

In Low Mode, the Yellow indicator turns on when the battery voltage gets down to about 6.xx volts, the red light comes on around 6.02 volts, the red light starts flashing at around 5.67 volts.  Once the Red indicator starts flashing, the user has no control over the light until the battery pack is disconnected and a new pack is connected.

 

Beam Shots:

My normal driveway shots.  Did bother posting a tree shot as it is barely visible.  This light is not built for throw.

 

 

Other Thoughts:

This light poses several mod challenges as follows:

  • The driver is not mod friendly.  It seems to have been built to barely handle the current it delivers stock.  It is also 3 dimensional which creates all kinds of complications with reflowing and even just soldering components. 
  • The light is very compact and has very little "elbow" room for heat sinking.  For that reason, I think a custom made copper heat sinking solution is the only real way to extract the heat with such a narrow shelf and the small exterior of the light.  The tight space appears prohibit piggy backing a different buck driver.

More has been done than is documented.  I have taken pictures here and there but did not have time to document all procedures performed.  Additionally, much was done to study circuits and integrate the various driver parts from different drivers.  So work was done that ended up not being relevant in the final build.  This was due to changes in design as the project proceeded.  For instance, when we decided the Attiny13a was not up for the job, the MCU work up to that point was tossed.  Another example is when we decided to toss the buck drivers and go with linear regulation.  This radically changed the design and build layout inside the light.  Even the battery pack cable became an issue it would cut into the small voltage overhead available in the new configuration.  Another thing not documented is all the testing and debugging needed for a completely new design/build.

Edited by: ImA4Wheelr on 07/28/2015 - 14:49
MRsDNF
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Sounds good. Looking forward to the updates.Smile

My current and or voltage measurements are only relevent to anything that I measure.

Budget light hobby proudly sponsored by my Mastercard and unknowingly paid for by a hard working wife. 

djozz said "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

siata94
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Why can’t i see the buy it now button?
Sounds like it’s gonna be pretty awesome. MTBers really need some help in this realm.

dchomak
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This is going to be super nice!

BTW, ImA4 you need to edit out a “+” symbol just after the link to ledoman’s review Wink

ImA4Wheelr
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MRsDNF wrote:

Sounds good. Looking forward to the updates

Thank you.  Me too.  Hoping to give Garry something that serves him well.

 

siata94 wrote:

Why can’t i see the buy it now button?
Sounds like it’s gonna be pretty awesome. MTBers really need some help in this realm.

Thank you.  You're such a positive presence here. 

MTBR's seem to be a resourceful bunch.  I guess they have to be.  Maybe they have not been listened to as much as they should due to the size of their community.  After corresponding with Garry on this build, I have a deeper appreciation for the community.  Purposeful and driven.  Gotta respect that.

May I ask what your avatar is.  When I try to magnify it, it gets too blurry for me to figure out.  Almost looks like a desert-type terrain.  Maybe a hiker, jogger, biker?

 

dchomak wrote:

This is going to be super nice!

BTW, ImA4 you need to edit out a “+” symbol just after the link to ledoman’s review

Thank you.  I hope so.  Working towards that.  I'll be using a material you provided me early in my BLF membership. Smile

Thanks for the info on the link.  I'll fix that.

 

siata94
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Yea, I wasn’t too thrilled with my avatar, it’s hard to tell what it is.

That’s me resting on my bike at the bottom of the valley with pretty steep slopes on either sides when my buddy took a series of shots that his phone stitched together, full size it’s pretty cool i think but resized it didn’t come out well.

I cannot accept even a fraction of your praise. I’m strictly taker here, have nothing to give. Hoping I should have some really compelling data soon on viability of using flashlights, albeit highly modded, for MTB.

Yea, MTBers are a pushy obnoxious bunch Smile

ledoman
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Subscribed. Looking forward to see into what this HD-016 will turn to. Had a lot of discussion with Garry about modes it should use. I'm glad he took my suggestions into account. I'm MTB-er too Tongue Out.

May I suggest to try out also another solution for throw part where deeper reflector resides. I would add another cooper disc to elevate the led so that 21mm LED-DNA 10deg TIR lenses would fit instead of the reflector. This would make throw beam much nicer and smotther (no ringy beam anymore). If it was me (and could do it) I would grind down also the other part in order to install 25deg TIR lense.

I've used 10+25 deg. LED-DNA lenses with clone of MJ-880 and it gives really nice beam. If you want it wider just replace one lense with 45deg. Just my opinion from my experience.

 

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Subscribed for sure

garrybunk
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ledoman wrote:
May I suggest to try out also another solution for throw part where deeper reflector resides. I would add another cooper disc to elevate the led so that 21mm LED-DNA 10deg TIR lenses would fit instead of the reflector. This would make throw beam much nicer and smotther (no ringy beam anymore). If it was me (and could do it) I would grind down also the other part in order to install 25deg TIR lense.

I've used 10+25 deg. LED-DNA lenses with clone of MJ-880 and it gives really nice beam. If you want it wider just replace one lense with 45deg. Just my opinion from my experience.

Hmm . . . interesting idea.  It would look awful funny having one TIR and the other a reflector.  And I don't remember the 45 degree (or even 60 degree) showing as wide of a flood as this light does from that flood reflector.  Also, I didn't notice rings in the beam or at least they didn't bother me.

I'm proud to have such a great group of people involved in this light build.  I certainly could not have done it myself!

-Garry

My Bike Lights Thread, Optics (TIR) Comparison Beamshots, Diffusion Techniques


NOTE: Moving my photos from PhotoBucket to Flickr. PM me or post in the thread if you can’t see my images and need me to fix or send a gallery link. PhotoBucket images should remain visible until November 2018.
siata94
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ImA4Wheelr, changed my avatar to something that is somewhat more visible.

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I just received this light from ImA with the custom firmware installed in order to test it.   Couldn’t wait, so I didn't Laughing .  I pulled the 18650 from my EDC (old Sanyo 18650 laptop pull), dropped it in, and gave it a whirl.   I have to say “I LOVE IT!!!!”  Timing seems great!  The press-n-hold 2 seconds to turn off or access strobe (which is only accessed from off) feels perfect!  Mode spacing appears good (shining under my desk at work), but I’ll give it a better review when it gets dark out.  The strobe timing seems good.  It's a slower beacon type strobe which is definitely not seizure inducing like so many lights. 

Thanks ToyKeeper for such an awesome firmware and thanks ImA4Wheelr for giving it a good home! (Now excuse me while I crawl back under my desk and go back to playing with the light Smile .)

-Garry

My Bike Lights Thread, Optics (TIR) Comparison Beamshots, Diffusion Techniques


NOTE: Moving my photos from PhotoBucket to Flickr. PM me or post in the thread if you can’t see my images and need me to fix or send a gallery link. PhotoBucket images should remain visible until November 2018.
ledoman
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Garry, nice to hear you are satisfied. Can you tell what spacing exactly have you choose to set in this sample?

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My desired modes are: Low (10%-15%), Medium (40%), High (75%), Turbo (100%) with turbo step down to "high" after +/- 90secs.  ImA will be adjusting the firmware to hit levels close to my goals.  I wanted a low that wasn't anything like "moonlight" and was enough to leave on while stopped to light up the surroundings.  Turbo is intended as generating heat than the small light body can handle (this is really just a guess) but for those times that you just want a quick boost to see just past the fringes of "high".  High at +/- 75% should be around 2.0A per emitter and likely at the limit of heat the body can handle, while yet still providing pretty good runtime on an 8.4v 5200mAh battery pack. 

The U.I. is as follows:

Blinks once when the light receives power, just to let you know it’s connected.

From off:
Short click for low.
Long press (2 seconds) for strobe.


While on:
Short click to increase brightness by one level. Loops from turbo back to low, bypassing “off”.  If in strobe, short press goes to high.
Long press (2 seconds) to turn light off.

Strobe timing: 4Hz, 20% duty cycle

My intention was to have "Off" and "Strobe" only accessible intentionally so that a cyclist is never left in the dark, nor accessing stobe while riding. 

Whether or not the battery monitoring will work is up in the air.  I don't expect it will, but having it work will just be icing on the cake! 

Oh, and I should have also given thanks to ledoman for giving me input and feedback on this U.I. and mode levels.  And without his review I probably wouldn't have bought this light in the first place. 

-Garry

My Bike Lights Thread, Optics (TIR) Comparison Beamshots, Diffusion Techniques


NOTE: Moving my photos from PhotoBucket to Flickr. PM me or post in the thread if you can’t see my images and need me to fix or send a gallery link. PhotoBucket images should remain visible until November 2018.
siata94
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nice, can’t wait to see the beamshots.

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ImA4Wheelr wrote:
[snip] The Attiny13a will be piggybacked in a similar fashion to my X2 headlamp, but with a couple differences.  In order to facilitate a fine tuning FW flashes, this OSH Park PIC/Attiny adapter developed by BLF Member wight here will be used.  It will also enable future FW upgrades.

MCU, flashed with ToyKeeper’s FW and reflowed to adapter board.  The bottom (PIC side) of the board will be air wired onto the light’s driver. [snip]
Too bad that’s all those things are good for right now. Wink Maybe I should get back to that project.

The big plans in the OP sound good.

Break’s over for now. That was a long one! wight catchup WinkWinkWink
list of my drivers & variants (A17DD, FET+1 stuff, WIP stuff, etc)

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Sorry I haven't been around folks.  Been busy gathering info from the driver lately. It seems pretty sophisticated.  Has a lot of stuff going having 2 buck drivers and 3 voltage indicator leds.  Good news is I think there may be 2 voltage divider circuits.  I've taken snap shots of as many traces as I can get and have recorded some voltage readings relative to Ground.  I need to get more readings and also at a different voltage level for some.  It appears that the pinout for the MCU might be quite different from my X2.  Can't definitively say at this point.

Still have ways to go to get all the pieces fitting together in my mind.  Being hampered by traces disappearing under components.  It appears the critical traces I need to see are under the switch.  Problem is, I can't just unsolder it from the driver to see.  It's a big switch that has big pins/legs in every quadrant of the base board.  I would need to heat the whole thing to remove it.  Given the 3-dimensional nature of the driver and weight of some of the components, the driver would probably partially fall apart in the process.

I think it's a good thing that Garry only wants to do a modest increase in current to the emitters.  The inductors on this driver are pretty small.  Also, each driver has only one large diode per inductor.  The X2 has 2 for the one inductor.

Anyway.  I have more work to do and it will probably take me a few days before I can post a coherent report on the driver.  But, that's the hard part.  Once understood, the mod is the easy part.

The heat sinking mod is on hold while we sort out the AR coated lens Garry wants to use.  The stock lenses are 1mm thick.  He may be going with a 1.5mm thick lens.   That will impact the pill as it's the only place that can realistically be adjusted to accommodate the thicker glass.

I'll report back when I have some good progress or coherent information.

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Gonna park some driver pics here for folks in the future that may be interested in modding this driver.

Two buck drivers. Large diodes labeled "SS34", Inductors "100", Sense Resistors "R150", Buck Controllers "LEDA 1406",

Here's a couple, much better pics.  These are of Ledoman’s HD-016 driver from his review (Post#13).

Where most the action will take place:

The 3 pads with long traces going off to the right go to each of the 3 voltage indicator LED's.

The big trace in the center is B+ and connect to the 2 inductors.  The biggish traces on each side are the other side of the inductors and also connect to the LED+.

Need to redo this one below.

Switch and voltage indicator LED's side of driver.

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Those back lit photos are great for trace finding, niiice.

Three Tanna leaves to give him life, nine to give him movement. But what if he eats the whole bag?

Scott

ledoman
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ImA4Wheelr, two better pictures (non backlited) are mine from the review.

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^ Opps. You're correct.  Garry even told me that when he included them in a PM.  Sorry.  Correcting post right now

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No problem, it's just to be correct. Smile

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Oops, looks like a different firmware will be needed. I didn’t know this thing had battery indicator lights.

Then again, if it’s running on 2×18650 in series, I don’t think I can measure the voltage anyway. We’ll see.

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Hi ToyKeeper.  The driver appears to have 2 different voltage dividers (Still trying to sort out).  One MCU pin pad reads close to 1.5 volts and another at about 1 volt with fully charged cells.  I don't have exact numbers here at work.  I also need to measure with different input voltage levels.  I can adjust the values in the FW as needed.  I don't know of anyone pulling this off yet though.  I just know the theory the wight taught me.

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garrybunk wrote:
My desired modes are: Low (10%-15%), Medium (40%), High (75%), Turbo (100%) with turbo step down to “high” after +/- 90secs.

Yeah, I set those a tad bit different than requested. They’re actually about 1.6%, 12%, 46%, and 100%. But after adjusting the values on a visually-linear cube root scale with a maximum of about 1600 lumens, the resulting “perceptual” percentages are 25%, 50%, 77%, and 100%.

The low end may be a bit off since I’m not totally sure where “zero” is on this hardware, but I’m guessing it’s at about PWM=6/255.

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ImA4Wheelr wrote:

Hi ToyKeeper.  The driver appears to have 2 different voltage dividers (Still trying to sort out).  One MCU pin pad reads close to 1.5 volts and another at about 1 volt with fully charged cells.  I don’t have exact numbers here at work.  I also need to measure with different input voltage levels.  I can adjust the values in the FW as needed.  I don’t know of anyone pulling this off yet though.  I just know the theory the wight taught me.


That sounds like it’ll probably take a lot of trial and error, manually checking lots of different values and reflashing. And that’s if it works at all. It might deliver a constant voltage due to the buck driver, and it could possibly be too low to measure accurately (the attiny13a’s reference voltage is 1.1V). In any case, it likely won’t be easy.
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ToyKeeper wrote:
ImA4Wheelr wrote:

Hi ToyKeeper.  The driver appears to have 2 different voltage dividers (Still trying to sort out).  One MCU pin pad reads close to 1.5 volts and another at about 1 volt with fully charged cells.  I don’t have exact numbers here at work.  I also need to measure with different input voltage levels.  I can adjust the values in the FW as needed.  I don’t know of anyone pulling this off yet though.  I just know the theory the wight taught me.


That sounds like it’ll probably take a lot of trial and error, manually checking lots of different values and reflashing. And that’s if it works at all. It might deliver a constant voltage due to the buck driver, and it could possibly be too low to measure accurately (the attiny13a’s reference voltage is 1.1V). In any case, it likely won’t be easy.
ImA4Wheelr, did you measure both of those voltages as changing with different Vbat? Just based on what you wrote I’d expect that one of those two voltages was probably a reference voltage to compare the other voltage against. (If so, the ATtiny13A will not need that.)

I think that the easiest course of action is simply to make up a new voltage divider and work with what we know.

Break’s over for now. That was a long one! wight catchup WinkWinkWink
list of my drivers & variants (A17DD, FET+1 stuff, WIP stuff, etc)

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^ Haven't had a chance to try different voltages yet.  Just trying to understand some basics about this driver.

The traces don't make sense to me yet.  I can't completely track the PWM traces going to the Buck Controllers.  I expected 2 separate pads to control PWM for each driver because the stock light operates them independently.  But only one pad seems too activate both of the drivers simultaneously.  So far, this diagram is about all I think I know about the stock MCU pin pads.  The voltage readings are from ground.  Doesn't that the Vcc seem high?

The indicator LED's are always connected to positive power.  It appears that the MCU must a path to ground to turn them on, but when I try to ground those pads, the emitters do not light.  They light when tested with a DMM though.

Something seems to have gone wrong.  Now when I connect power to the driver, one led turns on and one of the sense resistors starts to smoke within seconds.  Wondering if a Buck Controller failed.

It's late and I got to crash for work tomorrow.  I think I will replace the Buck Controller is connected to the burning sense resistor and begin testing circuits all over again.  Probably should reflow the MCU and see if the driver still works properly too.  I'll decide tomorrow.

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Yeeee Haaaa!  We're in business.  Finally, got this driver sorted out.  It turned out one of the Buck Controllers had failed (Probably when I was poking and prodding around trying to figure this damn thing out).  I reluctantly pulled the switch so that I could see the traces under it.  That helped answer more questions.  I still can't follow the traces for PWM, but process of elimination gave a clear indication as to which pads were for that.  I think the traces are hiding under the vertical board.  I have much better trace pictures that I will soon replace some the pics in Post 16 with.  Here are a couple views of the traces under the switch:

We also seem to have a viable on-board voltage divider.  It measured 1.43v at 7.61v input and 1.55v at 8.2x input.  More measurements will soon be taken.  The other "voltage divider" seems to decrease voltage as input voltage increases.  So it doesn't seem like anything we will be utilizing in this build.

So, I'm at a point where I can now start modding the driver.  I should have something to report some time before the weekend it up.

EDIT: To all the folks that said nice things up above.  Thank you very much.  I'll reply to those posts sometime soon now that I'm starting to see some light at the end of the tunnel.

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Bad news ImA4Wheelr: The 1.4-1.6v range does not make for a simple mod. If there is not a rock solid Vcc available then it’s not useful at all to the ATtiny13A, which uses an internal 1.1v reference with current firmwares. ATtiny13A units without a fully regulated voltage supply cannot measure above 1.1v in other words.

I think I said it earlier, but the easy way out here is definitely just to build a new voltage divider. If you have a rock solid Vcc then the firmware could be modified to measure the stock voltage divider against that, but it would require (minor) code changes and (unknown amounts of) testing.

Good luck with figuring out anything strange relating to controlling the two buck circuits independently, I’m looking forward to that. Maybe there is a transistor which switches the availability of the PWM signal on or off for one of the circuits (so it would be controlled by a binary output from the MCU).

Break’s over for now. That was a long one! wight catchup WinkWinkWink
list of my drivers & variants (A17DD, FET+1 stuff, WIP stuff, etc)

ImA4Wheelr
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Having an on-board circuit makes this so much easier.  I just need to change out resistors to get the appropriate voltages.  I think it's good news.

The drivers were independently driven stock. The will both be feed the same PWM signal from the Attiny.  One may end up putting out more current overall to balance the beam pattern, but they will both get the same PWM feed.

Thanks for the input wight.  Always appreciated and valued.

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I agree, if you can swing that it would be much nicer than having extra resistors banging around all over the place.

Break’s over for now. That was a long one! wight catchup WinkWinkWink
list of my drivers & variants (A17DD, FET+1 stuff, WIP stuff, etc)

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