Test/Review of 2S 3A LiIon charger TS-2012H

10 posts / 0 new
Last post
HKJ
HKJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 28 min ago
Joined: 05/24/2011 - 12:23
Posts: 7336
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Test/Review of 2S 3A LiIon charger TS-2012H
2S 3A LiIon charger TS-2012H

DSC_9757

Official specifications:
  • Input: 110-240Vac 60/60Hz
  • Output: 8.4V 3000mA DC

This charger is for battery packs with 2S2P (2 in series 2 in parallel) or 2S3P or more parallel LiIon cells. The battery pack is supposed to contains its own protection and balancing.

DSC_9755

I got the charger in a simple cardboard box.

DSC_9756

Contents was the charger and a couple of different mains plugs.

DSC_9760 DSC_9761

DSC_9763 DSC_9764 DSC_9765
It is fairly easy to replace the mains plug.

DSC_9762

DSC_9759

The led is a two color led, it will show red when charging and green at all other times.



Measurements
  • Connector is 5.5mm/2.1mm
  • Idle power consumption: 0.31 watt
  • Unloaded voltage 8.47 volt
  • Charger has no short circuit protection, the current will be above 10A when shorted.
  • Above about 0.9 volt the output current is limited and the red led will flash.
  • Will start charging at 3.9 volt.
  • Led shows green when only connected to a battery, but not mains
  • Green led is on when connected to mains, but not a battery.


Testing with 4 cells means a 2S2P pack.

TS-2012H%20(4xPA18650-31)

The charge curve is a CC/CV, but the charger never stops, it just reports battery full (Green led) and continues to charge.

TS-2012H%20(4xPA18650-31)%20Efficiency

Same curve as above, I have just replaced capacity with efficiency, it is at about 80% during charge.

TS-2012H%20load%20sweep

In the above curve I simulated a battery voltage from over discharge to fully charged. The charger is good at maintaining a constant current. The charger do not have a short circuit protection, but will limit the current from 0.9V to 3.9V!

During a charge I took IR photos at regular intervals of the hottest part of the charger:
Temp1826

M1: 62,1°C, M2: 44,7°C, HS1: 74,4°C
HS1 is the transformer.

Temp1827

M1: 39,7°C, M2: 58,3°C, HS1: 70,3°C
The fairly warm side is the heatsink on the rectifier diode, the actual hotspot is where the diode is mounted.

Poweron

The charger starts fast a charges with a steady current.



Tear down

DSC_9802

As usual the charger could be opened by putting some pressure on it.

DSC_9803

Being a battery charger and not only a usb charger it needs a bit more parts on the low voltage side.
At the mains input it has a fuse, bridge rectifier (4 diodes below capacitor), capacitor and a common mode coil. There is also the switch mode controller with a heatsink and optical feed back.

DSC_9804

From this angle the rectifier diode on a large heatsink is easier too see.

DSC_9805 DSC_9807

The loop covered in black tube (RS1) is the resistor used for measuring and adjusting the charge current.

DSC_9806

This side is mostly used for the rectifier diode heatsink and the common mode coil. The yellow tape around the heatsink is for voltage isolation, because the heatsink is connected to the low voltage side, but is very close to some mains connected parts.

DSC_9808

On the bottom the charge controller (A dual opAmp) can be seen, it is measuring the voltage accross the RS1 resistor and using the IC2 opto coupler to control the mains switcher.

DSC_9809

DSC_9810

There is a good isolation distance.


Testing with 2500 volt and 5000 volt between mains and low volt side, did not show any safety problems.



Conclusion

This type of charger is not nearly as advanced as single cell chargers. With only two wires to the battery pack it is impossible to do any balancing. The charger has a couple of issues: It is missing short circuit protection, it will slowly discharge the battery without mains connected (Will drain the battery in a few weeks) and it never turns the charge current off.
Calling it a 3A (3000mA) charger is also a bit optimistic, 2.5A is more correct.
The replaceable mains plug can be useful for traveling (If you can keep track of the plugs).


I will give this charger an acceptable rating.



Notes

The charger is from ShenZhen TengShun Power Supply Co.,Ltd, I got it with the help of BLF/MTBR user Ledoman.

Here is an explanation on how I did the above charge curves: How do I test a charger

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

Edited by: sb56637 on 06/25/2015 - 14:21
garrybunk
garrybunk's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 5 hours ago
Joined: 10/31/2011 - 09:25
Posts: 6093
Location: Johnstown, PA

Thanks HKJ for the reviews of these 3 2S2P Li-Ion chargers!  (These reviews are likely being read more by MTBR members due to ledoman's quest to find a good higher current 2S2P charger.) 

One question, how bad is it that these chargers do not terminate charge completely?  Are they still safe?  How long beyond "full charge" (i.e. green LED lit up) would you have to leave the battery on to really be at risk of overcharging? 

Thanks!
-Garry

My Bike Lights Thread, Optics (TIR) Comparison Beamshots, Diffusion Techniques

, MTBR’s Lights & Night Riding Forum
NOTE: Now hosting my photos from my Google account. Post up if you can’t see them. Older photos hosted on Photobucket or Flickr may disappear (PM me if you want access to them).
HKJ
HKJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 28 min ago
Joined: 05/24/2011 - 12:23
Posts: 7336
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

garrybunk wrote:
One question, how bad is it that these chargers do not terminate charge completely?  Are they still safe?  How long beyond "full charge" (i.e. green LED lit up) would you have to leave the battery on to really be at risk of overcharging?

They do not over charge in the sense that it gets dangerous, but maintaining the battery at full voltage will wear it down considerable faster than without continues charge current.

That is the reason that charge chips (and many chargers) are made to turn the current off when full and then start a recharge cycle if the battery drops to much.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

garrybunk
garrybunk's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 5 hours ago
Joined: 10/31/2011 - 09:25
Posts: 6093
Location: Johnstown, PA

So the fact that the charger does not stop charging completely is still "safe" just not "ideal".  So leaving it on overnight (or for a full day if one forgot about it) would still be ok.  Many of the guys (& gals too for that matter) over at MTBR are not going to be as strict and safety conscious with li-ion charging as BLF users would be, so I just want to make sure these chargers are safe for "non-flashaholics". 

Thanks,
-Garry

My Bike Lights Thread, Optics (TIR) Comparison Beamshots, Diffusion Techniques

, MTBR’s Lights & Night Riding Forum
NOTE: Now hosting my photos from my Google account. Post up if you can’t see them. Older photos hosted on Photobucket or Flickr may disappear (PM me if you want access to them).
andy
andy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 6 months ago
Joined: 04/30/2015 - 13:26
Posts: 2
Location: NY

HKJ, would not most, if not all “wall wart” style chargers operate this way, i.e. no absolute cut off?

Guessing only hobby chargers or those designed to handle loose cells have the ability to switch off the current and then go into recharge cycle as you describe.

Thanks!

HKJ
HKJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 28 min ago
Joined: 05/24/2011 - 12:23
Posts: 7336
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

andy wrote:
HKJ, would not most, if not all "wall wart" style chargers operate this way, i.e. no absolute cut off? Guessing only hobby chargers or those designed to handle loose cells have the ability to switch off the current and then go into recharge cycle as you describe. Thanks!

A device designed as a charger is supposed to include real termination, but it looks like battery pack chargers are missing it (My sample is rather small, only two brands).

Hobby chargers do not include automatic recharge.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

andy
andy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 6 months ago
Joined: 04/30/2015 - 13:26
Posts: 2
Location: NY

I see that my XTAR VC4 does terminate the charge at 4.2V for each cell, and according to the manufacturer, begins recharge when voltage falls below 3.9V.

Guess when charging batteries in packs it really does pay to keep an eye on the indicator LED.

ledoman
Offline
Last seen: 7 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 09/25/2010 - 06:27
Posts: 934
Location: Slovenia (EU)

It is my understanding that in the past those chargers were designed to charge welded packs with protection circuit. So the safety issues are solved elsewere.I haven't seen that type of charger that would have cut off, even Magichine works like this. Don't know for higher priced brands.

Wearing out is also not a big issue if you think you are going to use pack 50 times a year (average user very likely even less). This would give you 500 charges in a 10 years. The batteries would be worn out very likely because of age and not because of charge cycles. All in all 5 years is the optimum usage time. In practice it is more important to store batteries half charged when not used for a longer period than to take care of fully topped charge.

HKJ
HKJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 20 hours 28 min ago
Joined: 05/24/2011 - 12:23
Posts: 7336
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

ledoman wrote:

It is my understanding that in the past those chargers were designed to charge welded packs with protection circuit. So the safety issues are solved elsewere.I haven't seen that type of charger that would have cut off, even Magichine works like this. Don't know for higher priced brands.

Protection circuit in a battery pack would not fix it.

 

ledoman wrote:
Wearing out is also not a big issue if you think you are going to use pack 50 times a year (average user very likely even less).

How fast the pack wears out depends on how many hours you charge on a full pack, if you use the pack every "day" and charge it every night it will probably wear out in considerable less than 5 years.

I do ride a bike daily (not MTB) and every winter I do charge batteries every night, this is more than 50 times in a year. I have used a battery pack some years, but it is more convenient to use a light with build in batteries and I do not need as much light as a MTB on a bumpy path.

 

 

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

ledoman
Offline
Last seen: 7 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 09/25/2010 - 06:27
Posts: 934
Location: Slovenia (EU)

HKJ wrote:

ledoman wrote:

It is my understanding that in the past those chargers were designed to charge welded packs with protection circuit. So the safety issues are solved elsewere.I haven't seen that type of charger that would have cut off, even Magichine works like this. Don't know for higher priced brands.

Protection circuit in a battery pack would not fix it.

Yes I know, it won't fix wearing out. I just wanted to explain why they were designed so. And then they probably didn't even think about wearing out.

HKJ wrote:
ledoman wrote:
Wearing out is also not a big issue if you think you are going to use pack 50 times a year (average user very likely even less).

How fast the pack wears out depends on how many hours you charge on a full pack, if you use the pack every "day" and charge it every night it will probably wear out in considerable less than 5 years.

I do ride a bike daily (not MTB) and every winter I do charge batteries every night, this is more than 50 times in a year. I have used a battery pack some years, but it is more convenient to use a light with build in batteries and I do not need as much like as a MTB on a bumpy path.

Still in practice for an average MTB user this won't be a big issue as the one would probably buy new packs from time to time with higher capacity for more powerful lights we get spoiled on. But technicaly speaking you are right.