Review: Klarus XT12GT (XHP-35 HI, 1x 18650) - Estimated Output, Runtime, and Beamshots.

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unknown00101
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Review: Klarus XT12GT (XHP-35 HI, 1x 18650) - Estimated Output, Runtime, and Beamshots.

Klarus XT12GT

 

 

Summary:

Battery:  1x 18650 or 2x CR123A
Switch:

 Dual switch:

 Forward Tailcap Clicky (momentary on) &

 Electronic Tailcap Switch 

Modes:

 2 Mode Groups:

 Tactical Setting - Turbo, High, Low + Strobe.

 Outdoor Setting - Low, Medium, High, Turbo + SOS

Mode Memory:  None, Quick access to Turbo/Strobe (Tactical), Turbo/Low (Outdoor)      
LED Type:  XHP-35 HI, Cool White tint ('Pure white')
Lens:  AR Coated Glass 
Reflector:  Smooth
Price:  $94.95  $60.99 Use code: df5c20
Provided by:  Banggood

 

Function / User Interface: 

The Klarus XT12GT has a very nice switch setup with 2 complementary mode groups for different scenarios.

The primary switch is a forward clicky switch. The switch can be depressed slightly to activate the momentary on functionality which will turn the light on in turbo mode as long as the switch is depressed. Clicking the primary switch will engage Turbo until it is clicked again. The primary switch can be used to access turbo immediately from any mode.

The mode switch is an electronic switch that allows for access to Strobe (Tactical Mode Group) or Low (Outdoor Mode Group). Pressing and holding the switch for more than 2 seconds and then releasing will engage Strobe or Low (depending on the mode group) until the switch is activated again or the primary switch is pressed.

The mode group can be changed by pressing and holding the mode switch for more than 10 seconds. The indicator light on the charger attachment point will alternate flashing between green and red. While still holding the mode switch, pressing the primary switch will engage the other mode group. 

 

For those visually inclined people, Klarus includes an excellent diagram of the UI in the included manual.

 

 

 

Charging:

The XT12GT has integrated charging functionality. The small charging piece is magnetic and attaches to the side of the light. The magnetic attraction is not very strong. If the light falls over or rolls during charging it will likely detach.
The charging starts off around 1A and slowly decreases as the battery is charged. The indicator light is red during charging. The charging piece does block most of the indicator light.

Here is a few minutes after starting the charging process on a 3.14v Samsung 30Q 18650. 

 

Around 4 hours later the charging is complete and the cell measures 4.22v. The indicator light shines green.

 

 

 

Data & Measurements: 

 

 

I measure fairly close to Klarus' specifications.

 

 

All throw measurements are lux values taken at 7ft and calculated back to 1 meter (Rounded to the nearest hundred). Estimated Max Output (Lumens) values are calculated based on measurements taken 30 seconds after turn on and are obtained through a DIY 'pvc lumen tube' in an effort to achieve diffusion of dissimilar beam profiles. As such, these values should be taken as "rough approximations."

 

The following test took place in 68°F Ambient temperature, indoors, with very little air movement. The flashlight sits head facing down on a piece of glass that is recessed inside a 4" PVC pipe. No external cooling is used.

 

The XT12GT holds the incredible 1800lm for a minutes and then slowly steps down during the following 2 minutes to about 850lm. Then things get a little odd. Output slowly increases for about a minute, holds at a peak for a few seconds and then slowly drops back down and holds at the valley for a few seconds and the process repeats. The peak and valley output decreases with each cycle. The rise and fall is slow enough that it is not noticeable. Output stabilizes around 53 minutes into the test. Output very slowly declines after 66 minutes until it stabilizes at 430lm at 80 minutes. Output rapidly falls at 88 minutes down to 13lm. I manually ended the test at 126 minutes; the cell measured 3.06v.

 

 

Pictures: 

The Klarus XT12GT arrives in a small retail box packed with goodies.

 

 

 

The box includes a holster, Klarus lanyard, and extra O-ring, magnetic charging piece, a very nice flat micro-USB to USB cable, a manual, a 3600mAh Klarus 18650 cell, and of course the Klarus XT12GT.

 

 

On the side is the magnetic charging attachment point. The clip and anti-roll ring come pre-attached, but can both be removed. The clip is very sturdy and extremely tight around the tube. 

 

 

On the opposite side is a tripod mount.

 

 

The switch configuration is quite exceptional. The large rubber switch is the primary switch, and the mode switch has a small piece of metal that leverages down onto the rubber switch below. The two different materials allow you to very quickly tell which switch you're pressing. 

 

 

The magnetic charger piece snaps into position on the magnetic attachment point. The micro-USB end of the cable attaches to the end opposite the small metal loop.

 

 

The charger piece has a smooth finish with a tiny little switch on the top.

 

 

On the bottom we can see the attachment point and a small opaque rectangle...

 

 

That emits a surprising amount of light. Enough to read with or even navigate indoors in pitch black.

 

 

The beautiful business end. The pink AR coating can be seen here. That special little XHP-35 HI led sits perfectly centered at the bottom of the smooth reflector.

 

 

The finish on the entire light is superb. The anodized black is semi-gloss. All edges are nice and smooth, and I could not find any imperfections on or under the anodization.

 

 

 

 

The magnetic attachment point is the only sub-par part as far as aesthetics are concerned. It appears to be press fit and the edge of the plastic ring got a bit marred during the process. Not really a big deal, just not as perfect as the rest of the light.

 

 

A closeup of the tripod attachment point.

 

 

Some more excellent machining. The lettering is nice an crisp as well.

 

 

Here's a closeup of the tactical anti-roll ring. It has a small hole for lanyard attachment. 

 

 

This is the mode switch below the metal piece that presses down on it during activation.

 

 

 

 

The tactical anti-roll ring can be removed quite easily after removing the tailcap. The threads are square and very lightly lubed. The black piece sticking out past the bare threads is actually a separate tube that spins but does not fall out. I believe this is where the magic happens with both the switch design, charging, and mechanical lockout (Loosening the tailcap about a quarter of a turn will lock out the flashlight). Very interesting design. 

 

 

Down the tube is a nice double spring.

 

 

The tailcap also has a double spring.

 

 

Here is a closer look at that beautiful LED.

 

 

... And when it's angry... or just on. Smile

 

 

 

 

Comparison:

Here's a comparison shot of three similar but very different compact thrower flashlights.

From left to right:

Flashlight  Configuration Output (Est. Lm)  Throw (CD)
Nitecore P30 Stock - XPL-HI 1149 93400
Convoy C8 XPL-HI V2-3B, FET +1, Braided Springs, 5.8A 1508 111100
Klarus XT12GT Stock - XHP-35 HI 1810 85100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beamshots:

As with all beamshots in my reviews, every shot is taken using the same settings in manual mode.

In this location the central tree trunk is about 50 yards away. The water line is about 35 yards away. The hanging tree limb in the upper left quadrant of the pictures is about 10 yards away.

 

Continued from above we have the Nitecore P30, Heavily modified Convoy C8, and Klarus XT12GT.

The P30 has a very concentrated, tight hotspot with a dim, somewhat wide spill. Comparatively the modified C8 has a similarly somewhat wide, brighter spill with a wider and brighter hotspot.

The XT12GT has a less wide spill with similar brightness compared to the C8 and a very wide and brighter hotspot.

In person the biggest difference between the three lights is the very wide hotspot of the XT12GT. The increased output is pretty tough to discern by eye.

 

 

Klarus XT12GT Modes: Low - Medium - High - Turbo

The XT12GT has very good mode spacing with an exceptional 'Pure White' tint. 

 

 

 

Conclusion:

The Klarus XT12GT is a very nice flashlight.

The fit and finish, the UI, mode spacing, and the pure white tint is all excellent. With the discount, considering everything that comes in the package, $61 is really quite a nice deal.

 

If you're looking for a compact thrower type flashlight with a large hotspot the Klarus XT12GT may just be the flashlight for you.

 

To get the Klarus XT12GT for $60.99 Use code: df5c20

(Traffic tracking link)

Edited by: unknown00101 on 04/03/2017 - 02:17
teacher
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Very nice review! Thumbs Up

You never know how a horse will pull until you hook him up to a heavy load./"Bear" Bryant 

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ARsee
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I see you compared the Nitecore P30 to the XT12GT in your review.

Of the two, which one has the furthest reach?

unknown00101
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ARsee wrote:

I see you compared the Nitecore P30 to the XT12GT in your review.


Of the two, which one has the furthest reach?


Most of my side by side experimenting with the comparison has been < 70 yards. At that distance they look pretty similar as far as throw is concerned. On paper the P30 has a little more throw than the XT12GT.

I’ll see about heading out to my 150-200 yard area tonight if the rain stops.

bunnicula
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Thanks for this comprehensive review. But I’m still confused between this and the P30. I do like the P30 more because of its sleeker form (I don’t really like the color of the XT12GT’s bezel), however, the P30’s hotspot is quite small. Liked the XT12GT’s hotspot, just the right size. How does this compare with the Acebeam EC60?

ARsee
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As an experiment, and to decrease spill, I narrowed the field by making a shield to slip over the head of the light. The results are effective.

By doing so, it gets me thinking. What if the reflector was that length? How much farther could would the light throw?

unknown00101
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bunnicula wrote:
Thanks for this comprehensive review. But I’m still confused between this and the P30. I do like the P30 more because of its sleeker form (I don’t really like the color of the XT12GT’s bezel), however, the P30’s hotspot is quite small. Liked the XT12GT’s hotspot, just the right size. How does this compare with the Acebeam EC60?

I don’t have an EC60, but based on its size I would guess it would have a bit wider spill with a similar hotspot. Overall they are probably pretty similar with regards to beam profile.

The P30 is really a dedicated thrower, wide but dim spill and concentrated hotspot.

The XT12GT is a nice blend between a thrower/flooder in regards to both hotspot and output and still has very good throw.

ARsee
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I haven't heard of the Acebeam EC60 until now, and just watched a video review by scannerguy66. That light has some punch.

But just for the fact it uses the 26650 batts, I consider it to be in another class of light, for size.

I don't feel it should be in the same classification for comparison to the XT12GT.

bunnicula
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unknown00101 wrote:
I don’t have an EC60, but based on its size I would guess it would have a bit wider spill with a similar hotspot. Overall they are probably pretty similar with regards to beam profile.

The P30 is really a dedicated thrower, wide but dim spill and concentrated hotspot.

The XT12GT is a nice blend between a thrower/flooder in regards to both hotspot and output and still has very good throw.

ARsee wrote:

I haven’t heard of the Acebeam EC60 until now, and just watched a video review by scannerguy66. That light has some punch.


But just for the fact it uses the 26650 batts, I consider it to be in another class of light, for size.


I don’t feel it should be in the same classification for comparison to the XT12GT.

Yeah, my bad, forgot that the EC60 is a 26650 light, that would be unfair to the XT12GT and the P30.

unknown00101
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I don’t know about excluding 26650 lights. There’s quite a few advantages to be had by just increasing the tube size and weight by a little bit. For example, the EC60 is 5mm wider in the tube and ~60g heavier w/ battery, but also 5mm thinner at the bezel and 30mm shorter. Overall it’s actually more pocketable than the XT12GT. You also get the benefits of having greater capacity and higher potential output with the 26650 cell.

Just something to consider.

Personally, though a completely different light, the HD2010 is still probably top 5 on my all-time greatest flashlights for how perfect that 26650 tube fits in one’s hand. Smile same with the Olight R50 Seeker which is similar to the EC60, but a floodier light utilizing the XHP-70.

sesgum
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Thanks for the nice review!

XT12GT is very nice by looking at your beam shots. It has a very bright small hotspot in the center. Around it there is a dimmer corona.
In real world use this type of beam pattern is more useful than the other two.

bunnicula
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unknown00101 wrote:
I don’t know about excluding 26650 lights. There’s quite a few advantages to be had by just increasing the tube size and weight by a little bit. For example, the EC60 is 5mm wider in the tube and ~60g heavier w/ battery, but also 5mm thinner at the bezel and 30mm shorter. Overall it’s actually more pocketable than the XT12GT. You also get the benefits of having greater capacity and higher potential output with the 26650 cell.

Just something to consider.

Personally, though a completely different light, the HD2010 is still probably top 5 on my all-time greatest flashlights for how perfect that 26650 tube fits in one’s hand. Smile same with the Olight R50 Seeker which is similar to the EC60, but a floodier light utilizing the XHP-70.

Yup, I totally agree. The R50 Pro that I recently acquired is surprisingly more comfortable to hold than my S30R Baton II and M1x. For that, I would definitely buy the Acebeam EC60 compared to the Nitecore P30.

ArmoredFiend
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No idea what happened. But after reading through the review and saw the code for discount at banggood….accidentally ordered 1 for myself.

Was planning to get XT11GT initially…but since it’s $89.90 for the 11GT vs $63 for the 12GT..oh well….