Metal Detector Thread for Treasure Hunters

26 posts / 0 new
Last post
pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93
Metal Detector Thread for Treasure Hunters

hey i searched the forum for this and did not find anything. i was surprised at that. I never owned a metal detector before and i just bought a 30 yr old teknetics 9000 that needs a little work. i may have been better off buying a newer model for about $200 but i wanted to see what this would do on a BUDGET… i think it’s a pretty good model. i looked at reviews on metaldetectorreviews.com and learned that experience counts for a lot using a metal detector.
does anyone have any comments or recommendations about metal detectors ??
what are some brands and models that you thought were a good bargain ??
please feel free to tell some good stories.

mattlward
mattlward's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 25 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2015 - 09:20
Posts: 2231
Location: Illinois, USA

I use a MineLab, an older White’s DFX, older hopped up White’s IDX with Mr. Bills mods and a Teknetics Omega 8000. Love the first and last, but the Whites are very accurate.

EDC rotation:
Convoy S2+, 6*7135, XM-L2 3D, 10 degree TIR, PilotDog lighted tailcap.
Convoy S2+, H17F, XM-L2 4C, lighted tailcap
Zebralight SC52w-L2
Olight S1A
Olight S1R

joel95ex
joel95ex's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 1 week ago
Joined: 12/26/2013 - 21:09
Posts: 264
Location: East Texas

after seeing a bunch of instagram posts from relic hunters in europe and all of the WWII stuff they were finding, i looked on some metal detecting forums and there were a couple models that everyone recommended . i also didn’t realize they change the coils … i was turned off by the prices though—one that seemed to get a lot of attention was the garrett ATpro there are some lower priced ones as well as ones 4 times that price…. i would read on several forums and beware that some of the review sites are run by manufacturers or dealers so the forums are probably better… after i saw the $4-500 price tag plus my lack of time and places to go i kinda decided to wait. anyway i would jump on the forums but this gives an idea of prices
on some models https://www.metaldetector.com/top-metal-detectors-for-sale

brad
brad's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 5 hours ago
Joined: 12/04/2012 - 02:07
Posts: 2066
Location: USA

I hope that this thread gets lots of responses, I have never owned one but am anxious to get started.

Boaz
Boaz's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 days 20 hours ago
Joined: 11/07/2010 - 09:31
Posts: 6148
Location: Birthplace of Aviation

You’ll need to get some black socks, sandals,too much sunblock an umbrella hat and a dazed look

καὶ τὸ φῶς ἐν τῇ σκοτίᾳ φαίνει καὶ ἡ σκοτία αὐτὸ οὐ κατέλαβεν

sp5it
sp5it's picture
Offline
Last seen: 41 min 55 sec ago
Joined: 12/25/2012 - 07:51
Posts: 484
Location: Poland

No wonder you didn’t find. It is flashlight forum. Suprised?

When you’re born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you’re born in America, you get a front-row seat.

 

JamesB
Offline
Last seen: 22 min 25 sec ago
Joined: 08/24/2011 - 14:43
Posts: 686
Location: France
Boaz wrote:
You’ll need to get some black socks, sandals,too much sunblock an umbrella hat and a dazed look

Can you legally operate a metal detector without one of those ?

zelee
zelee's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 3 min ago
Joined: 06/04/2013 - 06:53
Posts: 1841
Location: S.E.A
JamesB wrote:
Boaz wrote:
You’ll need to get some black socks, sandals,too much sunblock an umbrella hat and a dazed look

Can you legally operate a metal detector without one of those ?

!https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/479369VEST201400EQsm.jpg!

or this one

Don’t mistake my kindness for weakness.
I am kind to everyone, but when someone is unkind to me, weak is not what you are going to remember about me.

weklund
weklund's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 12 min ago
Joined: 08/16/2014 - 10:32
Posts: 186
Location: Orange, Ca.

Saved my allowance and preordered a soon to be released Garrett AT Max …. does it all. Available in August.

I hope to find a new mood ring in the dirt. I lost mine back in 1976.

... Happy Landings ...

mattlward
mattlward's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 25 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2015 - 09:20
Posts: 2231
Location: Illinois, USA

I have had a fair amount of luck with mine, most used is my Minelabs Explorer. It is a slow swing, very deep unit if you take time to understand it. Favorite finds… 183x large cent and 1865 2 cent piece. Also about 3 dozen Indian Head pennies and several musket balls in southern Illinois.

EDC rotation:
Convoy S2+, 6*7135, XM-L2 3D, 10 degree TIR, PilotDog lighted tailcap.
Convoy S2+, H17F, XM-L2 4C, lighted tailcap
Zebralight SC52w-L2
Olight S1A
Olight S1R

joel95ex
joel95ex's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 1 week ago
Joined: 12/26/2013 - 21:09
Posts: 264
Location: East Texas

weklund wrote:
Saved my allowance and preordered a soon to be released Garrett AT Max …. does it all. Available in August.

I hope to find a new mood ring in the dirt. I lost mine back in 1976.

yes i remember the at-pro and max were some of the most frequently discussed Thumbs Up

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

https://www.ebay.com/itm/182423904482
This might be a good deal. I didn’t see any reviews on the site.
I am aware there are many scam review sites but the one in OP seems to be real. Detectors from many different manufacturers are said to be very good. There is a budget Chinese detector on Ebay also. I wonder which one they cloned ?

Edit. Garrett Ace 200 said to be a kids model , no bells whistles

J-Dub74
J-Dub74's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 hours 27 min ago
Joined: 03/14/2015 - 17:17
Posts: 2151
Location: Michigan

This thread caught my eye fast. I’ll be following closely. Smile I’ve wanted a good metal detector for years. I used to read my grandfather’s old Treasure Hunter magazines from cover to cover as a kid. All about metal detecting and buried treasure. Filled my head with dreams…

A few friends of mine did a bit of research around 2-3 years ago and both bought a Tesoro Compadre. Allegedly it offers a lot of bang for your buck if you want something that will actually work pretty well but are just getting into the hobby so don’t want to drop $500+ into one. They’re around $165 I think and I like what I hear but there may be better bargains out there. I’ll wait for the experienced treasure hunters here to chime in with more. I can’t afford any new toys for a while but I hope to buy a metal detector in the next year or two. I can’t say exactly what my price range will be but I’m probably going to want to keep it under $200.

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

Talked to KellyCo rep steve.
At around 200 He recommended Whites treasure master and Garrett ace 350.
In Georgia Red Clay (iron rust) it takes a $500 machine to work properly.
-
There’s a ton of Bounty Hunter detectors on Ebay and I think that’s because they don’t work. They have bad reviews.

hank
hank's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 35 min ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:52
Posts: 7241
Location: California

I’ve wanted a good one for years, too. Or a good rental, if such exist.

I know exactly which half acre my wedding ring is in.

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

For something like a gold ring close to the surface, you can get a used machine on eBay , find your ring and maybe some other stuff, then resell on Ebay. A $50 bounty hunter machine should suffice. They do work, just not down to 12 inches deep.

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

@mattlward which minelab do you have ? What bell and whistles are needed on a good machine to be used on Red Clay. ? Thx.
Do you use your 4 machines for different target metals ?

mattlward
mattlward's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 25 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2015 - 09:20
Posts: 2231
Location: Illinois, USA

I use the Minelab Explorer, love it have coils from tiny to large. This is a very slow sweep machine and will try your patience. In crappy soil, good ground balance is your friend. It is very hard to work soil like that. Target ID is not very useful on any machine, sounds are the key and I like the Minelab sounds.

EDC rotation:
Convoy S2+, 6*7135, XM-L2 3D, 10 degree TIR, PilotDog lighted tailcap.
Convoy S2+, H17F, XM-L2 4C, lighted tailcap
Zebralight SC52w-L2
Olight S1A
Olight S1R

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

http://accuratelocators.com/faq
Look what they sell on that site.
This info is at the link also.
How deep can good metal detectors be expected to find coins?

Metal detectors can be expected to find coins around this depth. This question is much easier to answer nowadays because virtually all modern metal detectors are ‘motion’ or VLF discriminator types. Most of them are also fitted, as standard, with search coils of around 8″ diameter, which is generally regarded as the optimum size for coin hunting on sites with moderate amounts of metallic litter. Using an incorrect sweep-speed will also affect depth, but the following figures are achievable with a correctly used detector:

Nickel-Dime sized targets – 4 to 8 inches*
Quarter-Half Dollar sized targets – 6 to 12 inches*
Fruit jar lid sized targets – 8 to 16 inches*.

Many other factors can affect your detector’s depth, but the same factors will affect all other detector depths. The two most important things for you to do today are to become familiar with your machine, and to use it at the proper sweep-speed.

*Depths vary by model, manufacturer and coil size.

Can one detector do it all?

Some of the better ‘all purpose’ detectors can make a pretty good job of most treasure hunting assignments, but there are certain machines specifically designed for such tasks as underwater work and gold nugget hunting. These specialized types are less adaptable to general-purpose work.

Are detectors with lots of knobs better than those with just a few knobs?

All detectors fall into one of two classifications; ‘turn on and go’ or ‘do it yourself’. The first group has either a preset ground adjust, or an automatic ground adjust. They do not require any further adjustment by the operator because the electronic circuitry takes care of eliminating mineral effects. The ‘do it yourself’ group usually have a multi-turn ground adjust knob which must be set to the correct position by the operator. Such machines are generally capable of just a little more depth provided they are set correctly, but they yield much poorer results when incorrectly adjusted. Both ‘turn on and go’ and ‘do it yourself’ units can be very effective.

What kind of detector should be used for relic hunting and coin hunting?

An all-purpose detector will do both jobs, although a larger coil might be an asset whilst relic hunting. For coin hunting, a motion discrimination detector is virtually essential if you wish to avoid digging out every bit of iron you find in the ground. Other features, such as notch discrimination, target identification and coin depth indication can be regarded as optional extras.

What’s the difference between concentric and wide scan coils?

A concentric coil is better than a wide scan coil at discriminating, but it is much more affected by the soil you are working in. A wide scan coil is less affected by the soil, and can yield superior results in areas of high mineral concentrations such as salt water beaches.

Which coil size is best?

For an all purpose detector, the standard coil supplied with the unit is usually the optimum size for most hunting. In extremely littered areas, a smaller coil (4″ or 7″) will usually bring better results; even though the smaller coil has less depth on coin-sized targets, your results will be better because good targets are less likely to be masked out by bad targets lying next to, or over them. When searching in relatively clean and litter free areas, a larger coil (10.5″ or 11″) will usually yield better depths and a wider area of coverage because masking of good targets is less likely to be a problem.

How much discrimination should I use?

If you are serious about finding gold rings and gold coins, use as little discrimination as possible. Most gold items are rejected at about the pull-tab level of discrimination. By eliminating pull-tabs, you are also eliminating most gold targets. Even when using a notch discriminator to reject pull-tabs you may lose gold targets which have the same phase response (or ‘electronic fingerprint’).

A truly serious hunter, and one who has been successful over many years, will have dug many pull-tabs, but that is why he has also found most of his gold targets. With today’s motion machines, it is pretty easy to get rid of most of the iron objects, but those iron objects could be masking good targets beneath them.

What is the purpose of notch discrimination?

Notch discrimination can be used either to reject a narrow band of targets (a notch reject), or to respond to a narrow band of targets (a notch accept). It is usually used to reject pull-tabs while still finding small coins and gold target that do not have the same response as pull-tabs. The notch level control generates a ‘window signal’ whose width is set by a small component on the PC board. This ‘notch window’ can be moved up and down the discrimination range until it properly covers the desired range of target response.

If the detector is being used to eliminate the response to the pull-tabs, you must remember that any good targets which have the same phase response as pull-tabs, and which therefore fall within the same window, will also be eliminated. Such good targets consist mainly of gold items and rings.

The ‘notch accept’ feature can be used to tune the detector to a particular type of item, such as a known type of ring. The detector will then only find items which fall within that narrow notch window.

Does using notch discrimination cause loss of depth?

Yes it can cause a small loss of depth, for two reasons. Firstly, the notch discriminator adds a slight amount of capacitance to the normal discriminating circuit, and this slows the detector’s response to targets. Sweep-speed then becomes more critical when seeking deep targets, but if the detector is used at the correct sweep-speed, the loss of depth will not amount to much.

Secondly, Signal strength diminishes at the top and bottom edges of the notch window. As the target approaches the response cut-off of the filters used, its signal weakens. Setting the top and bottom edges of the notch window will cause some loss of depth on those targets. However, a properly adjusted notch window will not cause a great deal of depth loss.

How do I adjust the sensitivity control to get maximum depth?

First find out which modes are affected by the sensitivity control on your detector. Do it by turning your machine according to the instruction manual, and then waving a good target over the coil with the sensitivity control set first at the maximum, then at the minimum position. If the detecting distance alters, then the sensitivity control is functioning.

When using the detector on site, set the sensitivity control as high as ground conditions will allow you to use the machine without too many false signals or spluttering noises. Too many spurious signals will make hearing the weak responses of good, but deep targets difficult.

How does target ID work?

If you have any kind of discriminating metal detector, you already own a ‘do it yourself’ ID machine. By increasing the discriminate level until the target disappears, you can tell what the target is. This is done automatically and very rapidly by a target ID detector while you work. Basically, the electronics measure the phase angle of the target at the moment the signal occurs. It generally takes only one pass over the target to get accurate identification, although the earliest models required several swings, which is why they were know as ‘pump up’ ID detectors. However, on older sites, many ancient coins and artifacts may show as junk or reject signals. ID detectors therefore are best suited to searching for modern coins.

Is manual ground adjust better than fixed ground adjust?

A fixed or automatic (ie factory preset) detector will always give good performance, no matter what type of ground you are hunting on. A manually adjusted machine may increase the detection depth by a small amount, but only if the adjustment is very accurately carried out. Incorrect adjustments may give horrendous results. For the average user, a preset or automatic detector’s performance is superior to the results that might be obtained with an improperly adjusted manual machine.

Are battery test readings accurate?

Only if the tests are done while the batteries are delivering the proper amount of current to the detector. Some cheap battery testers, and even some more expensive meters, may give erroneous results when used to test batteries that are not delivering current during the test. An audio test is much more reliable since the audio circuitry loads the battery to the detector’s full power while the test takes place.

By how much will the use of headphones increase battery life?

Since the speakers in most detectors are of 8 or 16 ohms impedance, while most detectors use a resistor of approximately 100 to 200 ohms to limit the sound output in the headphones, the current necessary to drive a set of headphones is considerably smaller than that required to drive the low impedance speaker. Using the figures just given, a set of headphones would increase battery life by 2 or 3 times. However, since the electronic circuitry in the detector is always operating when the machine is switched on, even though the detector may not be making any noises, the savings on battery life may not be as big as the above numbers seem to indicate.

Why does my detector sometimes detect rocks and tree roots?

The detection of rocks can be due either to your detector’s ground adjust not being set correctly so that typical ‘hot rocks’ are ignored, or to the rock that you have just found being a truly positive reading mineral sample. Hot rocks are iron ores or magnetite, which are ‘negative’ with respect to normal ground signals. Their intensities can vary considerably, which makes setting the detector to get rid of all of them a little tricky.

Early motion detectors usually ‘beeped’ at hot rocks, but switching to all metal yielded a ‘null’ response. Since the hot rock was negative in all metal and also negative in discriminate, both signals were the same, and the detector said ‘good target’ even though it was really bad. Today, most manufacturers set the ground adjust so that the filtered all metal signal responds in a positive fashion to hot rocks. Therefore, the signals are different, so the detector doesn’t beep at negative hot rocks.

However, minerals come in many different forms, and some of them are detectable. Tree roots can also absorb various chemicals and end up being electrically conductive. Sometimes, all you can do is grin and bear it.

Will meter detectors find coins deeper than non-meter detectors?

Not generally. It takes some kind of circuitry to drive the meter, and if that circuitry has more gain than that which drives the speaker, it may be possible to detect deeper with the meter. But virtually all manufacturers realize that if they can get deeper performance, they will add the extra gain to the audio stage as well.

How do I overcome interference from other detectors when I am at a rally?

Interference occurs when two detectors of similar frequencies operate in close proximity. The nearer the frequencies, the further apart the two detectors will interact. Crystal controlled detectors are especially prone to this problem because the crystals are very accurate. The only solution in that case is to fit a ‘frequency shifter box’ or to get further away from the interfering machine.

Are ‘audio enchanters’ any good?

They operate by amplifying weak signals and attenuating strong signals. Thus, they tend to make all signals sound alike. They can be helpful when you are hunting in TR discriminate, or in all metal mode, or if your detector has an ‘audio threshold’. However, on ‘silent search’ detectors are less effective, though they do limit the sound in your headphones when you pass over a piece of surface junk. This can add to your comfort during extended search periods.

What is ground canceling, and how can I adjust my detector to the right point?

Think of ground canceling as being exactly the same thing as discrimination. If your ground control is set too low (counter-clockwise) the detector will ‘reject’ the ground. If your ground control is set too high (clockwise) the detector will ‘find’ the ground by beeping as the coil approaches the ground.

Your aim is to set the ground control so that the detector remains neutral to the ground, or doesn’t see the ground at all. It will then detect as deep in the ground as it does in the air. To accomplish this, first tune the detector to a threshold tone while holding the coil in the air. Then lower the coil to the ground and listen. If the threshold dies away, turn the ground control in a clockwise direction. If the threshold tone gets very loud, turn the ground control counter-clockwise. Next, raise the coil, retune to a threshold tone and repeat the above operations. When you get it right, the sound will change very little as you lower the coil.

Why does my detector find large deep nails and rusty iron even when set to reject pull-tabs?

Unfortunately, most motion detectors can be fooled by large rusty items, This is especially true of circular targets, such as iron washers and steel bottle caps. Sweeping the detector faster will help a lot on the steel bottle caps, and it will help some on the washers. Fortunately, large pieces of iron will be heard as much ‘broader sounding’ targets than non ferrous items in the all metal mode. Experienced motion detector users rarely dig large pieces of iron.

Does the moistness of the soil affect detection depths?

A lot of metallic targets corrode when lying in damp soil. This can cause the target to appear much larger than it really is. When the soil dries out, the corrosion may not affect the detector and the target will seem more like its normal size. Gold doesn’t corrode in the ground, and silver doesn’t corrode nearly as much as copper, brass and bronze. Iron and steel, of course, rust in moist ground, and can cause some really horrendous false signals.

Is depth sacrificed for accurate identification in a target ID detector?

Virtually all target ID detectors can find targets much deeper than they can identify them. Discrimination only requires one reference signal, which yields a positive signal for good targets and a negative one for bad targets. To identify the target requires some very special and complex electronic circuitry, which does not have the ability to reach the same depth as a simple discriminator. If manufacturers limited the depth of their ID machines to the depth of the identifier circuit, they would sell a lot fewer detectors.

How should I adjust the discriminate level on my detector to achieve maximum depth?

For maximum depth, set the discrimination level as low as possible. To get the absolutely best depth, set the discrimination level at the point where you get a broken signal, rather than no signal at all, from the type of object you want to reject. This will give you some additional signal on all good targets that are heard.

By how much, and in what ways, is a $1000.00 detector better than a $600.00 detector?

The $600.00 detector will probably have the same depth as the $1000.00 machine, but it will not have all the features of the more expensive unit, such as a meter, depth measuring ability, notch capability, target ID, multiple discriminate levels, surface blanking, and the other ‘bells and whistles’ that can raise the cost of a basic machine. But unless you really want those features, and understand that you will consume a lot more batteries by powering them, why pay for them? Although some manufacturers may put less gain in their cheaper models, you should expect to find only fewer features on your $600.00 detector.

What is the best operating frequency for finding gold?

Typically, most VLF detectors, made today operate in the 5 to 15kHz range, while gold detectors typically operate at about 20 kHz. The increase in frequency gives a minutely greater response to tiny bits of gold, but the increased response to small targets results from them having about ten times as much gain as general purpose detectors. Increasing the frequency much above 20kHz gives a tiny bit more response in air tests, but the increase is lost as soon as the target is laid on the ground.

hank
hank's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 35 min ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:52
Posts: 7241
Location: California

Will any of these find lead? as in bullets/shot?
I’m cleaning up a wildland site that’s had a lot of random shooting over past decades

mattlward
mattlward's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 25 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2015 - 09:20
Posts: 2231
Location: Illinois, USA

Joe, nice write up. I find that using headphones is a must. The sounds are much cleaner and the faint really deep items can be heard with more clarity. I also run with discrimination off most of the time and listen to the iron, one must fight the urge to dig a good one way pop off the edge of rusty iron, check from multiple directions and with varied sweep speeds before you dig.

Most areas I work are old farmsteads and fields where they were 150 years ago, very trashy sites. I really like the Detech 4.5×7” DD EXcelerator on any of my machines. Coins at 10 inches if you run open discrimination and pay attention. When I find clean areas I go to the Minelab 8” FBS or even the Detech 10×12” SEF Butterfly (one hot coil!) and for really clean pastures and fields I have a 15 inch coil for the Minelab that will go deeper than I want to dig sometimes. With the last coil I have pulled the little 1/4 brass tack rivet heads at over 13”, real PITA.

Used an old, really old White’s when I was a kid and started again at about 45 as therapy for my back and had forgotten how much fun it was to find things… Smile

EDC rotation:
Convoy S2+, 6*7135, XM-L2 3D, 10 degree TIR, PilotDog lighted tailcap.
Convoy S2+, H17F, XM-L2 4C, lighted tailcap
Zebralight SC52w-L2
Olight S1A
Olight S1R

pirate joe 22
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 08/26/2015 - 01:23
Posts: 93

bump for any new info or stories
what is your favorite budget metal detector ?

keltex78
keltex78's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 03/18/2011 - 10:15
Posts: 3266
Location: Texas

My father-in-law got a Garrett Ace 250 (?Maybe? Not sure of the model…) recently. I don’t know anything about the quality of that model unit, but I did spend some time walking around the field with it over the weekend. Found a couple of random iron pieces, and a handful of .45ACP casings. Of course, for the shell casings, it’s like hunting a baited area with the shooting we do there. I was surprised, the casings were a couple of inches underground even though they would only have been fired within the past couple of years.

I’ve used a basic kid-style detector on my grandfather’s land. He has some old farm land, and there had been a blacksmith shop there at one time. We find a LOT of stuff but it’s all junk, like broken tools, chains, and plow points. I think my uncle found a single wheat penny there, but that was the only “valuable” item discovered.

I’d like to get into the hobby, but the initial expense is a bit intimidating. That, and my half-acre of land would be pretty boring. I’d like to take one to the beach, but I understand it takes a high end unit to really do well there.


Keepin’ the “B” in BLF

Don wrote:
It sounds like the XM LEDs won’t really be suitable for flashlight use. Pity…

sparkyDK
Offline
Last seen: 10 hours 16 min ago
Joined: 04/08/2017 - 11:30
Posts: 281
Location: Denmark

Just imagine what you can find in the ground over here in the old lands, we even have a TV station that regularly have a program with detector guys running around.

Off course if you find a horde of nice Viking gold you have to hand it in, but you will get a finders fee off course, and its more than a pad on the back, some of those guys have gotten a new house for their finders fee.

Not hard to find stuff older than when we discovered the Americas.

These are the top 10 finds of 2013

hitesh
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 6 days ago
Joined: 10/09/2017 - 05:39
Posts: 1
Location: UK
Garrett ACE 250 is one of the best metal detectors when it comes to coin-hunting and relic hunting with its powerful discrimination, digital ID, and Iron audio finding treasure is like a walk in the park. for more info Best Metal detector

we deal with metal detectors like Garrett, Bounty-hunter, and Tesoro and provide valuable information about specification, features and cheapest price available online.
to know more please visit our site.
https://bestmetaldetectors.net/

JakeDjanitor
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 19 hours ago
Joined: 10/27/2015 - 09:00
Posts: 718
Location: North East USA

I have a cheap one. I forget brand. I know it’s a bounty hunter something.