blue light associated with prostate and breast cancer

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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
At the bottom of the first paragraph “Researchers found that night shift work links to breast cancer because it can change a person’s sleep-wake cycle. This has a lot to do with artificial light.”

This Theory was proposed in 1987 already. Later a study found blind nurses had a smaller chance for breast cancer. It was found, yellow and red light had the least effect on melatonin.

But … is there any country in the world that took measures to protect their nurses? What’s the situation now, 33 years later? And what’s with night shifts in general? What about DST, enforcing artificial light early (e.g. for school students) and, for some, leading to an extended period of daylight when workers and pupils should rather sleep?

Do we, as a society, voluntarily ignore the results?

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SKV89 wrote:
CW keeps me awake and alert much more than WW lights.

same here
I use warm lights to relax and cooler lights as worklights

I recently started learning about the use of Red Light for physical therapy .. fun stuff!

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Not to sound like a shill, but I got (and reviewed Wink ) a LITOM floor-lamp with brightness and color-temp settings, and its warmest setting is 1800K (!!) touting 99.4% blocking of blue light. I can’t possibly measure that, but I’ll assume it’s correct.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089NK1SRV/

Other than wishing it came in white or even brown “woodgrain” as an option, it’s quite nice.

And it has a special breastfeeding mode, for alla youse who are currently lactating. Shocked

 

Funny, too, I just (re)found my SF31 that I forgot was nicely WW. It might even displace my WW Xeno as my poke-around-at-night light (which always starts in medium).

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SKV89
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Very interesting find! 1800K is sweet and my dream temp for night lighting. However, I tested many ultra warm LEDs in the past that had positive DUV and the yellow bothers me. If this is 1800K with a negative DUV, and especially 90+ CRI, it would be the grail light. So far E21A 2000K 90+ CRI is the closest to candle light.

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Actually, I was wondering if the WW LEDs were actually PCA instead of WW-1800K. That would certainly take care of the no-blue part, as I don’t know if 1800K has much blue content, and if so, how much.

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Lightbringer wrote:
Not to sound like a shill, but I got (and reviewed Wink ) a LITOM floor-lamp with brightness and color-temp settings, and its warmest setting is 1800K (!!) touting 99.4% blocking of blue light. I can’t possibly measure that, but I’ll assume it’s correct.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089NK1SRV/

Other than wishing it came in white or even brown “woodgrain” as an option, it’s quite nice.

And it has a special breastfeeding mode, for alla youse who are currently lactating. Shocked

 

Funny, too, I just (re)found my SF31 that I forgot was nicely WW. It might even displace my WW Xeno as my poke-around-at-night light (which always starts in medium).

Looks interesting. Is there a way to rotate the head it so that it shines at the ceiling and functions more like a torchiere?
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Looks/Feels like a sheathed gooseneck, so it does bend backwards and even tilt/swivel. I’d just do it slowly and carefully, in case there’s any bias to being angled in one direction.

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Rusty Joe wrote:

people say that Splenda causes cancer. Utter nonsense. More fear-mongering. We humans need an enemy!

Yep, I agree on sugar substitutes.

A lot of people really believe it's dangerous, but not me.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/splenda-testing/

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SKV89 wrote:
There has been plenty of reputable sources that say exposure to blue light at night time increases risk of cancer.

For me, after years of experimenting with ceiling bouncing flashlights at night time, I can confidently say CW keeps me awake and alert much more than WW lights. I currently use the E21A 2200K for ceiling bounce while watching TV before bed and I get sleepy pretty quickly. Using a CW or even NW 4000k light keeps me awake.

Not gonna say I’m an expert, but I have noticed NO DIFFERENCE WHATSOEVER. And I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

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Huh… looks like someone already tried it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/RC15BE6VC1E9E/

So, yeah, guess it can be upturned torchiere style.

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cetary
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Quote:
I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

There’s some of your problem. According to a researchers at UC San Francisco from this article.

“The devices, which emit blue light, have become more common in recent years, and so has insomnia and other sleep disorders…The new study, of US adults, found younger users were on the devices for longer and reported having a more disturbed night’s sleep….Studies also showed hospital patients who read eReaders took longer to fall asleep and had reduced quality of sleep than those who read a traditional book, and those who watch the screens late at night before bed were most affected.”

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cetary wrote:
Quote:
I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

There’s some of your problem. According to a researchers at UC San Francisco from this article.

“The devices, which emit blue light, have become more common in recent years, and so has insomnia and other sleep disorders…The new study, of US adults, found younger users were on the devices for longer and reported having a more disturbed night’s sleep….Studies also showed hospital patients who read eReaders took longer to fall asleep and had reduced quality of sleep than those who read a traditional book, and those who watch the screens late at night before bed were most affected.”

the truth hurts,when there is giant buisness,but
Amber Narrow Leds are still blue light emitter phosfor converted or a just a direct amber light diode?
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I think direct amber
according to this
https://www.somnilight.com/blue-light-insomnia.html
a native amber LED has no blue output

if someone is using blue light sources
while wearing amber glasses, it maintains melatonin also

it does not matter if no blue is produced (native amber LED), or if blue is filtered out (amber glasses)

as long as no blue and green reaches the eyes, melatonin will not be suppressed

—-

which brings me to headlamps

a red headlamp, or amber, if you prefer, will not suppress melatonin, so will not supress sleep

a green headlamp will suppress melatonin, thereby delaying sleep

a blue headlamp will also interfere with sleep

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Years ago in an offset house we used high-cri light bays to assess color. Along came Ott lights and we started using those, as their cri is exemplary. These lights were developed with an eye toward health and are still marketed that way. There have been many studies done on them over the years and I’ll leave it to the individual to poke around and find something to believe, or not. I can’t quantify it, but I feel good around these lights and still use one in my darkroom. If they weren’t so expensive, I would light my whole house with them.

So I’m wondering if the health issues of bluish light are a question of strictly wavelength, or is the quality of the entire spectrum of a particular fixture a factor as well? Schools that install Ottlites have fewer sick days and higher grades, say the studies anyway. These are not led driven, they are gas tube phosphor.

Ott

cetary
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Indeed NBA has no blue output. Most of its output sits at 590nm like low pressure sodium. PCA, or phosphor converted amber, use YAG phosphors to produce yellow light from blue. There is typically less then 8% blue in such chips.

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cetary wrote:
Quote:
I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

There’s some of your problem. According to a researchers at UC San Francisco from this article.

“The devices, which emit blue light, have become more common in recent years, and so has insomnia and other sleep disorders…The new study, of US adults, found younger users were on the devices for longer and reported having a more disturbed night’s sleep….Studies also showed hospital patients who read eReaders took longer to fall asleep and had reduced quality of sleep than those who read a traditional book, and those who watch the screens late at night before bed were most affected.”

I got no problems. Smile

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Rusty Joe wrote:
SKV89 wrote:
There has been plenty of reputable sources that say exposure to blue light at night time increases risk of cancer.

For me, after years of experimenting with ceiling bouncing flashlights at night time, I can confidently say CW keeps me awake and alert much more than WW lights. I currently use the E21A 2200K for ceiling bounce while watching TV before bed and I get sleepy pretty quickly. Using a CW or even NW 4000k light keeps me awake.

Not gonna say I’m an expert, but I have noticed NO DIFFERENCE WHATSOEVER. And I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

Your anecdotal experiences disprove the decades of studies which also happen to have fairly solid theories for the causation of this effect?

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cetary wrote:
Quote:
I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

There’s some of your problem. According to a researchers at UC San Francisco from this article.

“The devices, which emit blue light, have become more common in recent years, and so has insomnia and other sleep disorders…The new study, of US adults, found younger users were on the devices for longer and reported having a more disturbed night’s sleep….Studies also showed hospital patients who read eReaders took longer to fall asleep and had reduced quality of sleep than those who read a traditional book, and those who watch the screens late at night before bed were most affected.”

Ehh I did shiftwork in hospitals where the lights were pretty much all 6500k~ or higher and still slept like a baby after shifts within 30~ mins of getting home so did my co-workers hell even during shift we would get sleepy under fluorescent lights….

Also the dailymail is hardly a credible source to cite from as the site itself doesn’t have citations to where their information was pulled from or what study……

DailyMail wrote:
Participants installed a smartphone application which recorded their screen-time, defined as the number of minutes in each hour that the screen was turned on, over a 30-day period.

They also recorded their sleeping hours and sleep quality.

It found that each participant had an average of 38.4 hours over this period, with smartphones being activated on average for 3.7 minutes in each hour during the day.

The numbers indicated from the article linked don’t even make any sense…. The observation period of 30 days how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours indicated is 30 days for sleep and cell phone use then they slap the number each participant had an “average” of 38.4 hours but neglect to indicate which….. if total hours of sleep how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours…. were they in a coma ? correct me if I’m wrong but I always thought “Average = Sum/Count”

so…. 38.4 = X/30 thus X = 1152

How in the hell did each participant sleep more hours in 30 days than total number of hours in 30 days…. I mean simple math 24 hours in a day 30 day observation period equals 720 hours….

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Souichirou wrote:
cetary wrote:
Quote:
I sleep with an iPad, iPhone, and Mac Book Pro right next to the bed. Plus, a large Samsung smart TV is 12 ft away.

There’s some of your problem. According to a researchers at UC San Francisco from this article.

“The devices, which emit blue light, have become more common in recent years, and so has insomnia and other sleep disorders…The new study, of US adults, found younger users were on the devices for longer and reported having a more disturbed night’s sleep….Studies also showed hospital patients who read eReaders took longer to fall asleep and had reduced quality of sleep than those who read a traditional book, and those who watch the screens late at night before bed were most affected.”

Ehh I did shiftwork in hospitals where the lights were pretty much all 6500k~ or higher and still slept like a baby after shifts within 30~ mins of getting home so did my co-workers hell even during shift we would get sleepy under fluorescent lights….

Also the dailymail is hardly a credible source to cite from as the site itself doesn’t have citations to where their information was pulled from or what study……

DailyMail wrote:
Participants installed a smartphone application which recorded their screen-time, defined as the number of minutes in each hour that the screen was turned on, over a 30-day period.

They also recorded their sleeping hours and sleep quality.

It found that each participant had an average of 38.4 hours over this period, with smartphones being activated on average for 3.7 minutes in each hour during the day.

The numbers indicated from the article linked don’t even make any sense…. The observation period of 30 days how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours indicated is 30 days for sleep and cell phone use then they slap the number each participant had an “average” of 38.4 hours but neglect to indicate which….. if total hours of sleep how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours…. were they in a coma ? correct me if I’m wrong but I always thought “Average = Sum/Count”

so…. 38.4 = X/30 thus X = 1152

How in the hell did each participant sleep more hours in 30 days than total number of hours in 30 days…. I mean simple math 24 hours in a day 30 day observation period equals 720 hours….

When very tired (and healthy) you can still sleep, that isn’t a counter to the fact that blue light reduces melatonin production.

That’s 38.4 hours on their phone over the test period. Number of hours each person spent on their phone/number of participants = average hours on phone

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Blue Light Deniers… Facepalm

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Souichirou wrote:

Ehh I did shiftwork in hospitals where the lights were pretty much all 6500k~ or higher and still slept like a baby after shifts within 30~ mins of getting home so did my co-workers hell even during shift we would get sleepy under fluorescent lights….

From years of testing, I can confirm I feel a difference in my sleepiness depending on the ambient lighting. It does not mean CW will for sure block a person from falling asleep. I can fall asleep under the afternoon sun laying on the beach. Sunlight emits more blue light than any CW emitter. When I’m tired, I can fall asleep under any lighting condition.

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jon_slider wrote:
Blue Light Deniers… Facepalm

Yep. It’s one of those “we only use ten percent of our brain” or “pitbulls have locking jaws” sort of thing.

Just look at how many studies said that resveratrol in wine helps heart disease. We know now that it does nothing of the sort. Many studies said that bodybuilding programs of the 90s like Cybergenix were “groundbreaking techniques” with “scientific evidence” and “peer-reviewed studies” behind them. Now, bodybuilders joke about how you should throw those in the trash since they are worthless. It was all marketing.

This blue light cult is just built around selling “blue light blocking” glasses on Amazon. Utterly useless.

I know it sounds egotistical of me and anecdotal as all hell, but I can call stuff like this early. It’s BS, they will find.

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Rusty Joe wrote:
The idea that blue light disrupts sleep and/or causes cancer is bogus. I know it’s fun to get off on the statistical stuff, but it’s nonsense. The same people say that Splenda causes cancer. Utter nonsense. More fear-mongering. We humans need an enemy!

There’s a lot of studies (and even, iirc, a few documentaries) about blue light being the primary trigger for melatonin/circadian rhythm stuff. I recommend you do some research yourself, it’s quite useful to know how to use to your advantage. For example, 2700K in the bedroom makes sleeping and/or winding down easy. 5000K in the office makes it easier to be alert and productive at work. Etc.
Lightbringer wrote:
Not to sound like a shill, but I got (and reviewed Wink ) a LITOM floor-lamp with brightness and color-temp settings, and its warmest setting is 1800K (!!) touting 99.4% blocking of blue light. I can’t possibly measure that, but I’ll assume it’s correct.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089NK1SRV/

Other than wishing it came in white or even brown “woodgrain” as an option, it’s quite nice.

And it has a special breastfeeding mode, for alla youse who are currently lactating. Shocked

 

Funny, too, I just (re)found my SF31 that I forgot was nicely WW. It might even displace my WW Xeno as my poke-around-at-night light (which always starts in medium).


My wife is nursing currently Wink But I just use my LT1. Doesn’t quite get to 1800K though!!
raccoon city wrote:

Rusty Joe wrote:

people say that Splenda causes cancer. Utter nonsense. More fear-mongering. We humans need an enemy!


Yep, I agree on sugar substitutes.


A lot of people really believe it’s dangerous, but not me.


https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/splenda-testing/


I’m not up to date on Splenda concerns. I’m not even sure if Aspartame causes cancer, but I do know it sucks. I recall reading (but was unable to find a source just now) that it’s responsible for over half of all complaints about food additives in the United States. I know it tends to give me headaches, and Sucralose (Splenda) or Stevia both taste better (subjective) and fail to give me headaches in my beverages.

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We’re getting off-topic here, but…

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/splenda-testing/

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LMGTFY

https://www.google.com/search?q=blue+light+nurses+study

Infant and elderly people are more susceptible to the sleep-disrupting effect of blue light, though older people have natural lenses that get increasingly yellow with age.

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One thing I learned long ago is that if someone wants to eat rat-poison as a sweetener, let him. Arguing about it is useless, both sides will trot out “evidence” of one type or another, he won’t stop eating it, and you’ll only get aggravated trying to convince him otherwise.

Bon appetit!!

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cetary wrote:
Indeed NBA has no blue output. Most of its output sits at 590nm like low pressure sodium. PCA, or phosphor converted amber, use YAG phosphors to produce yellow light from blue. There is typically less then 8% blue in such chips.

These NBA are interesting for this specific use.But CRI would be very low.
Where we can get on 3535 – 5050 size?
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Rat poison?

What have you been smoking?

Don't tell me you've been smoking colloidal silver again.  :FACEPALM:

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BurningPlayd0h wrote:
Souichirou wrote:

DailyMail wrote:
Participants installed a smartphone application which recorded their screen-time, defined as the number of minutes in each hour that the screen was turned on, over a 30-day period.

They also recorded their sleeping hours and sleep quality.

It found that each participant had an average of 38.4 hours over this period, with smartphones being activated on average for 3.7 minutes in each hour during the day.

The numbers indicated from the article linked don’t even make any sense…. The observation period of 30 days how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours indicated is 30 days for sleep and cell phone use then they slap the number each participant had an “average” of 38.4 hours but neglect to indicate which….. if total hours of sleep how in the hell did each participant get an average of 38.4 hours…. were they in a coma ? correct me if I’m wrong but I always thought “Average = Sum/Count”

so…. 38.4 = X/30 thus X = 1152

How in the hell did each participant sleep more hours in 30 days than total number of hours in 30 days…. I mean simple math 24 hours in a day 30 day observation period equals 720 hours….

When very tired (and healthy) you can still sleep, that isn’t a counter to the fact that blue light reduces melatonin production.

That’s 38.4 hours on their phone over the test period. Number of hours each person spent on their phone/number of participants = average hours on phone

Article that was linked indicates “each participant had an average of 38.4 hours over this period” thus your “Phone hours/ total patients = Average” wouldn’t be the equation that would apply as that would be the average of the observed group, BUT okay lets say it does, the way they presented the information is very deceiving as its the sum total time on the phone during the 30 day observation period of the group not a real average of each participant as indicated.

With this information that would roughly amount to an hour and 20~ minutes daily BUT they also indicated it averaged out to be around 3.7 mins per hour during the day on a say a 16 hour day that would only be 59 minutes on the daily. The average person generally spends more time on a computer for work, watching tv in leisure etc than whats indicated in this article…. One would think the volume of time in front of a monitor or tv is more detrimental than 1~ hour on your phone periodically through out the day…

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The Galaxy Note 9,has the same capability as well.

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