Test/review of RD Electronic USB load LD25

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HKJ
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Test/review of RD Electronic USB load LD25

RD Electronic USB load LD25

DSC_9700

Official specifications:


  • Rated operational voltage: DC 4-25.0V
  • Max discharging power: 25W
  • Rated operational current: 0.25-4.00A (when fan don’t work, the minimum constant current is 0.05A )
  • Fan Speed: Large size intelligent temperature control fan, speed 5800±10%RPM
  • Constant current resolution:±1% +3 digits
  • Heat dispatch method: intelligent temperature control fan + All aluminum fan
  • Working temperature: -10°C ~ 40°C
  • Adjustable potentiometer: Precision multiloop adjustable potentiometer
  • Display mode: 4 bit LED tube
  • Expansion port: Micro USB port, Type-C port

I bought from Aliexpress dealer: RD official store

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DSC_9703 DSC_9705

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DSC_9706

I will take a closer look at the circuit further down.

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The user interface is two buttons, a multiturn potentiometer and a 4 digit display. The SET button is used to change between current (A), voltage (U) and power (P) display. The load is turned on/off with the SET button and adjusted with the potentiometer. The current display is flashing when load is off.

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Overload conditions will disable the load and show a warning on the display. Here over power protection (OPP) and over voltage protection (OUP)
Holding the SET button down will toggle automatic resume on/off.
Holding the On/Off button down will toggle automatic on when power is connected.



Load testing


  • Current resolution is 0.01A
  • Voltage resolution is 0.1V
  • Power resolution is 0.1W
  • Internally current is adjusted in 0.01A steps, it is not analog!
  • Load is rated to handle 30V before being damaged, load shows OUP between 25V and 30V
  • Current adjustment range is from 0.00A to 4.10A, but supported range is from 0.05A to 4.00A
  • The load has USB-A, micro usb and USB-C connectors, all in parallel.
  • USB-C connector will not turn USB-C output on!
  • Voltage display shows voltage at input, any voltage drop is due to connector and cable resistance.
  • Current change during 60 minutes with 1A load at 24V is 0.012A, i.e. 1.2%
  • Current change during 60 minutes with 4A load at 6V is 0.025A, i.e. 0.6%
  • The adjustment is a multiturn potentiometer and the display will show the selected current.
  • The fan is audible, but not loud, it starts and stops as required (This is a bit annoying).
  • Touching the circuit while the load is on will change the current temporary.
  • Current when off about 15mA for the electronic and display.


dataCurrentdataVoltage

Both current and voltage readout has good precision.

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Due to the power limit of 25W it is not possible to test with high current and high voltage, here I had enabled automatic recovery, i.e. load would turn on when the voltage was low enough. On the yellow and green trace the fan did start and increased the current.

Electronic%20load%20RD%20LD25%20min.

Here I adjusted the display to 20mA, the real current was about 25mA and not completely stable.

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I tried two 1 hour test, one at 24V 1A and one at 6V 4A.

Temp5583

M1: 44.6°C, M2: 46.1°C, HS1: 57.4°C
First set of thermo photos is from 24V 1A test

Temp5584

HS1: 58.5°C

Temp5585

M1: 72.2°C, HS1: 79.1°C
Both transistor and regulator warms up with high input voltage.

Temp5586

M1: 44.5°C, M2: 50.8°C, HS1: 59.8°C
Next set of thermo photos is from 5V 4A test

Temp5587

HS1: 63.6°C

Temp5588

M1: 84.9°C, M2: 61.7°C, HS1: 91.7°C
With lower input voltage the transistor must handle all the power and gets a bit warmer, the shunt resistor do also get warm at 4A



A look at the circuit

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The transistor (TIP122) is the load element, it uses a resistor (R6: 0.025ohm) to sense the current. The fan is a 5V version and has its own regulator (LM317), at high input voltage it must handle some power. Turning the fan on/off is handled by a small transistor (Q2), the temperature sensor is very close to the TIP122 transistor and is a NTC (RT1) that is connected to the MPU.
The electronic has its own voltage regulators (U6: M5350B 5V, IC7:5333B 3.3V). The control of the load current is done with some OpAmps (U2 & U7: 358). The brain in the circuit is a 8051 microprocessor (U1: N76E003AT20 18KB Flash, 1k RAM, 12 bit ADC). For the display a 8 bit shift register (74HC595) is used to get more output pins.

Why 4 OpAmp (358 is a dual OpAmp), a load only need one OpAmp. A look at the circuit shows some filters connected to the MPU on U7. One filter is R11, R12, C8 and C9, the other filter is R15, R16, C14 and C15.

0.1A

Filter input from microprocessor at 0.1A

0.2A

Filter input from microprocessor at 0.2A

2A

Filter input from microprocessor at 1A
It looks like the R15 etc. filter is for fine adjustment and R11 etc. filter is for coarse adjustment.

2A1ohmSeries

The above PWM frequency is 1kHz, is there any trace of it on the output? To test that I added a 1ohm resistor in series with the load and measured the voltage across the resistor with my oscilloscope. There is some noise from the load, but not the 1kHz PWM frequency.



Conclusion

The load works fine and with the multiturn adjustment and display it is easy to adjust. It has no problems handle the rated 25W power. It is not for really low loads, the display do not have resolution for it and it also need some minimum current to work.
It is a interesting design choice that the analog current setting is sampled by the microprocessor and then output as two PWM channels that is filtered and mixed, before being feed to the load regulation.
With USB-C I am missing the ability to turn outputs on (It is just a resistor), this will limit its usefulness for USB-C.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

angerdan
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Always a pleasure to read your USB reviews!
I’m curious how do you see/rate it in comparision to the other USB loads you’d review.

That’s my classification:

wireless data/professional
Electronic load ZKE EBD-USB+

display/advanced
Electronic load 35W 3A with OLed display J7-f
RD Electronic USB load LD25

variable current/multiple use
USB Load 4-13V 3A
YZXStudio Load ZL1000

fixed current/cheap
USB Load resistor 1A
USB Load resistor 1A-2A usb output
USB Load resistor 1A-2A
USB Load resistor 2.2-4.7-10-20ohm with fan
USB Load resistor 2.2-4.7-10-20ohm
USB Load resistor Juwei 2.5-5-10ohm

HKJ
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It depends on how you want to use it.
The ZKE is the best if you want to use computer.
For stand alone I like the RD, the J7-f is a advanced load, but it died during the test, that is a big minus for me.
If you want to check QC chargers, then the ZL1000 is nice, but it is missing a display.
For a dumb variable load the 4-13V 3A is good.
I do not really like the resistors, mostly they get way to hot, but if you need a cheap when to test how chargers handle load, they can be used (together with a fan).

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

firedome
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Thanks for the review! Big Smile

“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.

-Plato

angerdan
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For QC, currently the YZXStudio ZL1100 would be the best solution?

HKJ
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angerdan wrote:
For QC, currently the YZXStudio ZL1100 would be the best solution?

For general charge protocol testing the ZL1100 is the best, but the ZL1000 is also useful, because it remember its setting.

My website with reviews of many chargers and batteries (More than 1000): https://lygte-info.dk/

d_t_a
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Thanks for the comprehensive review!

HKJ wrote:
angerdan wrote:
For QC, currently the YZXStudio ZL1100 would be the best solution?

For general charge protocol testing the ZL1100 is the best, but the ZL1000 is also useful, because it remember its setting.

Just wondering if the ZL1100 (or ZL1100P with supposedly improved USB-type C testing) been reviewed here?

~~~~

I’m also curious regarding how the J7-F compares vs this RD LD25/LD35 load tester.

It would seem that the LD25/LD35 load tester has a more fine adjustment of the current load, although the display is very basic.
The J7-F is more of an all-in-one and has more display screens/info.

So, between the two, the RD LD25/35 would be the better load tester (in terms of current load adjustment)?

~~~~

The EBD-USB and ZL1100 are much more advanced in terms of control (and more precision in terms of current load adjustment), one needing a computer and the other needing a separate power source (which can be cumbersome to use, but makes it more accurate).