Emisar D1sV2 respectively Noctigon K1

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junkyardbiker
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Snowed in? Im in Florida loving the weather Big Smile

Lurking flashaholic, Ive bought all my flashlights through lurking here, BLF A6, Sofirn C8F, Soforn Q8, Emisar D4, and a few not so budget lights but I mod them all the same! Been waiting for the FW3A to come out for years now.......

Yokiamy
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EasyB wrote:
EasyB wrote:
Raleigh scattering is for particles much smaller than the wavelength of the light and is stronger for shorter wavelengths. This is why the sky is blue; light scattering off air molecules.

But fog particles are several microns large, larger than the wavelength of light, and this scattering mechanism is called Mie scattering, which has little wavelength dependence. This is why clouds and fog look white and not blue.

We need some controlled experiments and photographs. I have seen photographs appearing to show both cases, cool light scattering more, and cool light scattering the same.

Quoted my message above for reference. If a light were shining in actually clear air with no particles in it then cool light will scatter more. But my guess is that there is usually a significant particle density in the air whether it be fog particles or dust. Even if it doesn’t look very hazy there are a lot of particles. Scattering off of these relatively large particles is probably going to be dominant, and this type of scattering is not wavelength dependent.

Below are some pictures I just took. On the left is a convoy S2+ with smooth reflector and 2mm^2 white flat. On the right is another S2+ with smooth reflector but with a warm dedomed XPL. I adjusted their powers so their beam intensities were equal. The second photo is just meant to show the color difference. I lowered the powers to arbitrary values for the second photo.

It was not foggy out, but in the beam you can easily see very small water particles floating around. It is a 5s exposure. I think the amount of scattered light looks the same. So, again, if the air is actually very very clear the cool light will scatter more, but with any particles in the air the light will scatter a lot more, and it will be the same for warm or cool light.


!{width:70%}https://i.imgur.com/pIvZxV0.jpg!

maybe you can try to do this test again but measure the output of the lights with a luxmeter to substantiate.
The left beam looks dimmer, but usually CW tends to be more visible, which isn’‘t the case now.

  BLF

EasyB
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Yokiamy wrote:
maybe you can try to do this test again but measure the output of the lights with a luxmeter to substantiate. The left beam looks dimmer, but usually CW tends to be more visible, which isn’‘t the case now.

The beam intensities were the same as measured with a lux meter.

You say CW tends to scatter more, but this experiment and an understanding of the scattering mechanisms show otherwise. That’s sort of why I’m bringing it up again; maybe the common belief that CW scatters more is just not true in most cases.

Yokiamy
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Call me stubborn, but i’m not convinced.
It looks like the total Lumen output of the right hand side is higher. (It must be, because the illuminated area is larger)

A real side by side test involves equal testing.
2 identical s2+ lights on the same brightness level, with proper lux readings and with identical LEDs but different tints.

Problem is driving them to an equal Lumen output.

  BLF

EasyB
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Yokiamy wrote:
Call me stubborn, but i’m not convinced.
It looks like the total Lumen output of the right hand side is higher. (It must be, because the illuminated area is larger)

A real side by side test involves equal testing.
2 identical s2+ lights on the same brightness level, with proper lux readings and with identical LEDs but different tints.

Problem is driving them to an equal Lumen output.


Fair enough, but what exactly is your stubborn belief based on?

You are right that the total output of the warm light must be higher since the beam intensities are the same. This could be the reason why the warm light actually appears to scatter more in this photo. Although the beam is the same intensity, it is wider which would mean more scattered light in the beam cross section. However, I think the photo dispels the myth that cool white scatters a lot more.

Yokiamy
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Its nice to know i’m not the only stubborn person over here Wink

I like my tints neutral’ lets call it a personal thing.

  BLF

EasyB
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Yokiamy wrote:
Its nice to know i’m not the only stubborn person over here Wink

I like my tints neutral’ lets call it a personal thing.


I’m not trying to change anyone’s preference. I usually prefer neutral around 5000K especially when used outdoors. I just seek the truth; there’s no reason to use incorrect reasoning to justify one’s preference.
adam7027
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I just jumped in to say, that the 4000K SST-20 tint choice for K1 is amazing.

I compared it to an Astrolux MF02 (XHP35 HI 4000K), and of course, it has a bit narrower beam, but goes almost to the same distance.

For me, it feels like a complete replacement for these reasons:
- 230kcd is already very impressive, considering, that I chose a 95CRI tint
- 95CRI is well noticeable over the 70-ish CRI of the other flashlight beam, it is just better to look at the beam
- WAY much lighter and more portable

Also, jumping from the top of the ramp to turbo makes the CCT several hundreds K ‘cooler’. I’d say about 4100-4200K for top of the ramp, but it feels like around 4600K-4800K in turbo (no measurements, just guesses).

Again, this is amazing.

I already purchased a phosphor converted (wider spectrum, somebody said, pale) green K1, as I could not resist.

I just wonder, if there could be a good (high intensity) phosphor converted amber, or similarly, a very ‘warm’ CCT (preferably under 2200K) white, as it could be also a very special thrower.

For people preferring a bit wider and more powerful beam (and being less bothered about heat), a 3500K 90CRI XHP35 HI option could be also welcome.

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