[ Lume1-FW3X: Constant Current Buck-Boost & FET Driver with Anduril + RGB Aux ] - For Sale Now!

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contactcr
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Those tiny RGB pads do make this 100x harder. I know nothing about PCB design, I only wonder if maybe the K pad could be relocated and then spread out the RGB pads evenly in the same spot.

I tried to get away with not taking my own advice and pre-tinning a few RBG wires and that was a big mistake. I’m using stranded 30 AWG PTFE wire and it wanted to spread out and fray on me. In my series of pictures I also left the RBG wires too long so they really had to be pushed down to make optic seat.

I think for me the biggest challenge was getting the wires in position to comfortably solder. The actual solder process is so quick and with flux they resist making shorts since it tends to melt straight downwards. I still did redo some that looked bad and ultimately ending up with a “good enough” result.

Hopefully the driver is rock solid, able to be flashed easily, etc and the aux board can just be “icing on the cake” for people who want the additional challenge of defeating the final solder boss.

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hinbli wrote:

I would like to confirm that the triple 219B can be used with Lume1 with the existing/installed firmware. The stock driver (the one with 7135’s) needs the different version of the firmware (less current) for the triple 219B.

219B SW45K with Lume1 is the holy grail for me as well. E21 would be good, too. It should result in the smaller hot spot/less flood.

I would say it’s a matter of risk. The 219B’s on a FET driver will be overdriven relative to Nichia’s specs. I believe there are some people using 219B’s on the stock driver with the stock firmware, on the assumption that because they don’t use turbo much, and use a medium drain battery like the Sanyo 18650GA or Samsung 35E, it is low risk. However I may have misunderstood some of the previous posts.

There is a Nichia-targeted firmware in Toykeeper’s repository that limits the FET channel to 50%. This technique probably shouldn’t be used with the Lume1, because it can not PWM the FET channel. On Lume1, the FET channel is max on only. The Lume1 also has a customized version of Anduril, and I missed if the code for that is shared yet.

If the Lume1 firmware is tweaked to disable the FET channel entirely, then it is entirely safe, but obviously the max output is reduced. However, you still get probably 700-800 lumens, high efficiency, and RGB aux capability, all in super high CRI.

Keep in mind E21A has noticeable tint shift across the beam if using narrow optics. As a result, most people choose the medium beam optic with the E21A, so the spot is not very small.

pol77
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Well, I am using 219b LEDs in all 5 of my FW3x lights. 2 are now running Lume1 drivers. Fingers crossed it does not end up badly.

On the aux LEDs front, I measured the following resistor values:

R: 330Ω
G: 100Ω
B: 220Ω

Is is possible the green and blue resistors were swapped by mistake? I am thinking of swapping them to use 220Ω on the green and 100Ω on the blue to see if that will fix it. Unless any of you guys are about to install a driver and fancies doing it (I don’t know when I will have time for the next installation).

Despite my experience soldering, the aux pads are indeed challenging Smile

id30209
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Instead of replacing resistors, swaping wires from driver to aux board could fix this issue?

Green and blue wire swap?

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pol77
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id30209 wrote:

Instead of replacing resistors, swaping wires from driver to aux board could fix this issue?


Green and blue wire swap?

That would just light up green instead of blue and vice versa. Intensity is not controller by the driver but by the resistor in line with each LED.

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Thx

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pol77 wrote:
Well, I am using 219b LEDs in all 5 of my FW3x lights. 2 are now running Lume1 drivers. Fingers crossed it does not end up badly.

On the aux LEDs front, I measured the following resistor values:

R: 330Ω
G: 100Ω
B: 220Ω

Is is possible the green and blue resistors were swapped by mistake? I am thinking of swapping them to use 220Ω on the green and 100Ω on the blue to see if that will fix it. Unless any of you guys are about to install a driver and fancies doing it (I don’t know when I will have time for the next installation).

Despite my experience soldering, the aux pads are indeed challenging Smile

These are the same values I measured. I swapped a 120ohm resistor on the green channel. It’s better but still too bright. After my resistors arrive, I will be installing some lower value resistors on the blue/red channels and slightly higher value on green.

Soldering the aux pads was definitely challenging. I used 30awg stranded wire. I feel like this would’ve been slightly easier with solid core wire.

contactcr
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Here’s a close up of my (probably) first batch D4v2:

These values correspond to:

621 = 620 = Red
122 = 1200 = Green
911 = 910 = Blue

Correct me if I am wrong

KawiBoy1428
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I went..

1. Red 220

2. Green 330

3. Blue 100

Better… by my eye…might lower Green even more… taped everything down with Kapton Tape Hot-Aired the microscopic resistors

KB1428 “Live Life WOT

contactcr
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KawiBoy1428 wrote:
I went..

1. Red 200

2. Green 330

3. Blue 100

Better… by my eye…might lower Green even more… taped everything down with Kapton Tape Hot-Aired the microscopic resistors

This is what I was thinking too since blue seems very low as is.

I guess the real test is how does your yellow and cyan look?

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iamlucky13][quote=hinbli wrote:

There is a Nichia-targeted firmware in Toykeeper’s repository that limits the FET channel to 50%.

Does that even help much? Those values just set PWM on the FET, they don’t magically lower the maximum current. So while the LEDs don’t get so bright that it’s obvious that they’re overdriven, they are still overdriven half of the time. I’m not exactly sure how this in turn affects LED life expectancy.
My understanding may be off here, because I really don’t get how limiting the FET should save the LEDs.
contactcr
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Lets move on from 219B. The prototype used it and people have been building them for years.

Stick with 3500mAh battery (like was already mentioned above) and assuming heat path and reflow are good, enjoy your CRI. If you think someone will stick their brand new uber vape batteries charged to 4.25V in your light you can ask for $9 LED deposit when you lend it out.

The 50% PWM firmware is just a hack and probably protects edge cases. The stock driver really had no other way besides disabling FET so people asked and that’s pretty much all you can do.

pol77
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KawiBoy1428 wrote:
I went..

1. Red 200

2. Green 330

3. Blue 100

Better… by my eye…might lower Green even more… taped everything down with Kapton Tape Hot-Aired the microscopic resistors

Do you mean Red 220?

When you say better, are they close enough, like the Emisar? How are your intermediate colours?

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pol77 wrote:
KawiBoy1428 wrote:
I went..

1. Red 220

2. Green 330

3. Blue 100

Better… by my eye…might lower Green even more… taped everything down with Kapton Tape Hot-Aired the microscopic resistors

Do you mean Red 220?

When you say better, are they close enough, like the Emisar? How are your intermediate colours?


Yep 220…

KB1428 “Live Life WOT

contactcr
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Swap resistors:
red to green
green to blue
blue to red

New values:
Red 220
Green 330
Blue 100

Swapping the resistors is a test of patience. It’s not perfect but it’s way closer.

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contactcr wrote:
KawiBoy1428 wrote:
I went..

1. Red 220

2. Green 330

3. Blue 100

Better… by my eye…might lower Green even more… taped everything down with Kapton Tape Hot-Aired the microscopic resistors

This is what I was thinking too since blue seems very low as is.

I guess the real test is how does your yellow and cyan look?


Close enough……or what… First NovaTac/Lume 1 Shocked

KB1428 “Live Life WOT

contactcr
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You took so long I had to do my own! Big Smile

It’s close enough IMO. So close in fact you have to wonder if this is how they intended it.

contactcr
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KB, now fix the flashing key. Cut those traces and cross some wires Innocent

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contactcr wrote:
You took so long I had to do my own! Big Smile

**It’s close enough IMO. So close in fact you have to wonder if this is how they intended it.


Yep… Thumbs Up I have to agree… Lexel sent me a boat load of different micro resistors for these or his boards, I might mess around with the last driver, lowering the green and maybe the red a tiny bit more? Winter is coming.. Big Smile

KB1428 “Live Life WOT

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contactcr wrote:
KB, now fix the flashing key. Cut those traces and cross some wires Innocent

Hmmm…….. I sure would like to get rid of this useless AngryMUGGLE MODEAngry

KB1428 “Live Life WOT

pol77
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Another option with the provided resistors would be to use the 330Ω on the green, the 100Ω on the red and just solder bridge the blue. Would that fry the blue?

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Hello everyone,

I'm glad some people have received their boards! Unfortunately I personally haven't yet received mine yet, though they are in the mail and I should receive them sometime today hopefully.. I see that there has been a good amount of feedback so far so here are my comments.

contactcr wrote:
Could this be used with very low vF LEDs, like red for example?


Yes the system should work with red LEDs. However, you should make sure that FET is disabled; this can be easily done by changing the config files (e.g. change the ramping tables) and reflashing the firmware so that the FET is never used. The system will run in buck-mode for the entire range if red LEDs are used.

 

lightdecay wrote:
Is there a newer datasheet? https://cdn.shopifycdn.net/s/files/1/0031/0155/6806/files/LUME1-FW3X_Datasheet_-_PRELIMINARY.pdf


Yes there is, please see my github for the latest versions. https://github.com/loneoceans/lume1-fw3x-anduril/

 

gokalpm wrote:
I installed one of the drivers I received yesterday. It is definitely not the easiest but doable. 1) start by filing down the pcb cut marks. 2) My FW3A had a flat lip on one side of the PCB, but Lume1 did not. If you don't file it down, the driver does not sit properly. The circuit still works fine, but you will have a 1mm gap once you screw on the tube. I filed it down to the inner ring on the pcb, and then it fit just fine. 3) I used 0.3mm (28awg) enameled wire for RGB wire, marked them ahead with sharpie dots to distinguish later. 4) You absolutely have to have the original mcpcb. I had a noctigon mcpcb with sliced dogfarts, and did not have the right wire routing for secondary PCB to sit properly. So I switched over to original FW3A mcpcb with SW45K flowed. 5) It is a major PITA to make sure that the secondary LED pcb sits properly. It does not need to be flush with the mcpbc (I was not able to), but it needs to be as close as possible. In then end I had about a mm of gap and the optic sat nicely. 6) By the time I got to wiring the secondary LEDs, the sharpie dots were already cleaned out. However, it is ok if that happens - put together the battery tube, and test out the primary LED. Once you verify it works, turn it off and then start probing the secondary led wires with a voltmeter, you will find that one pair has some voltage between them on the order of volts. Between those, the (-) polarity is K on the secondary PCB, and the remaining three wires are RGB. Now, the modes are cyclic, so I honestly think it is not important how you wire between RGB wires, all permutations are valid, they just change the blinking order. I wired them randomly, and the flashlight seems to be working quite nicely so far. In the end, I have a FW3A with a buck boost driver supplemented with a FET for DD and SW45K. It is the almost the same size as my SW45K SC64C LE (not McBob version, my DIY version, but definitely inspired by him) and a similar efficiency for most lo-mid modes, but with a much more powerful hi-mode. Honestly, this is quite the holy grail for me, thanks lone ocean. Next, I'll switch over my FW3C to Lume1 and the sliced dogfarts which are another favorite of mine for when I prefer purer white of sliced LH351D over rosy 219B.


Thanks for the detailed feedback gokalpm. I'm glad you were able to get it working well in the end.
- I did not design the PCB with cutout because newer versions of the FW3x flashlights no longer have the notch, so I was told by Neal to make a round PCB. Filing would work to fit the older ones.
- The RGB aux board was designed for the Lumintop MCPCB not the Noctigon one

- The aux LED board should sit flush on top of the MCPCB. The Lume1 datasheet has an assembly section on how I put things together, and things to take note of as well.

 

contactcr wrote:
I'll add a bunch of commentary and tips but here's album from my build today:

That is a very clean build, thanks for sharing!


Whezzel wrote:
For those of you that have installed this in your lights. Are your green aux leds much brighter than the red and blue leds? I just installed this driver rgb board in my light. The mixed, red-green and blue-green, colors look solid green instead of yellow and teal like my other lights. The resistor on the green channel has a value of 100ohm. Does anyone know what the correct value should be? I checked some of my other lights and they have 120ohm resistors for the green channel.


That's unfortunate to hear.. Sad If you scroll back in this thread a while back when I got the first proto samples from Neal (the green PCBs), I found the resistors chosen to be non-ideal and made the Aux LEDs far too bright, and specifically requested them to be changed. I think Lumintop probably wanted really bright AUX lights, but that was not what I think they should be because I prefer the AUX LEDs to be very dim.

Personally, my recommended resistor values are:
1.8k for Red and Blue
5.6k for Green

These values allow for a good change in brightness when using the 'dim' AUX settings in Anduril as well (especially the breathing rainbow mode which I use most often), and they work really well in the nighttime, but will not be very visible in the daytime. These values are listed in the datasheet on Github too.

 

id30209 wrote:

Instead of replacing resistors, swaping wires from driver to aux board could fix this issue?
Green and blue wire swap?


LED intensity is controlled by the resistors, so swapping wires from driver to aux board will not change the brightness, but will change the ordering instead.

 

pol77 wrote:
Another option with the provided resistors would be to use the 330Ω on the green, the 100Ω on the red and just solder bridge the blue. Would that fry the blue?


No please do not use a solder bridge! I'll need to ask Neal why Lumintop didn't change the resistors to what I specified.

 

contactcr wrote:
Those tiny RGB pads do make this 100x harder. I know nothing about PCB design, I only wonder if maybe the K pad could be relocated and then spread out the RGB pads evenly in the same spot.


When I designed this board, it was immediately after I designed the Lume1 board, which I assemble and solder by hand. The actual driver board has smaller components so the LED pads seem easy in comparison, but you are right that normally this would be a challenging job because they're tightly spaced. [Update: it's done! https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/mtHUb4gp]

 

www.loneoceans.com/labs/

lume1 - Constant Current BuckBoost + FET Anduril Driver for FW3x
High Power Boost Drivers - GXB100 100W GAN FET Driver // GXB172 50W 17mm Driver
GXF22 - CC+FET for Emisar D4 // GFS16 - 1milliOhm FET Switch System // Older: GXB17 & GXB20

pol77
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I quite like the bright aux that can be seen during the day. For night time, he dim setting is dim enough. I wish it was balanced though… I believe even with the swapping around of the resistors, the green is still brighter and the blue dimmer than the red. I think I may try 75Ω for the blue (since no resistor at all is a no go), 160Ω for the red and 330Ω for the green. I have ordered some 0402 resistors to try.

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As someone who has never soldered anything before, it sounds like the aux lights are going to be out of the question, which is fine. Is just the driver swap fairly easy? What’s the process? Unsolder the wires from the mcpcb, remove the driver, unsolder the wires from the driver, solder the wires to the new driver, install the driver, solder the wires to the mcpcb?

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asdqqq wrote:
As someone who has never soldered anything before, it sounds like the aux lights are going to be out of the question, which is fine. Is just the driver swap fairly easy? What’s the process? Unsolder the wires from the mcpcb, remove the driver, unsolder the wires from the driver, solder the wires to the new driver, install the driver, solder the wires to the mcpcb?

Yes. As some others mentioned if you have a first batch FW3A with the dog eared driver slant you will need to re-create that “slant” in the new driver with sand paper or a file.

If you have a new batch FW3A with MCPCB screw you just need to check for any long burs coming from where that hole is tapped into driver cavity (honestly I forgot to even check mine).

Soldering to the driver itself is a piece of cake, the pads are large.

Soldering to the MCPCB is harder but as long as you have a clean, blunt tip and either A) some fresh leaded solder or B) flux paste you can probably do that too without much trouble.

I wouldn’t ordinarily re-use wires but in this case you could get away with it. They are good quality. Lumintop thermal paste is questionable but adequate. Those would be two “extra” things I always do because I have all the stuff for it already.

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Wow, that is a good looking board Smile Nice work loneoceans!

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contactcr wrote:
Those tiny RGB pads do make this 100x harder. I know nothing about PCB design, I only wonder if maybe the K pad could be relocated and then spread out the RGB pads evenly in the same spot.

I have a lot of soldering experience, and those RGB pads look great. My advice is to tin the pads and wires first while using plenty of flux. The connections should be a piece of cake at that point.

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I have just casual experience during past 2 years and did it so it’s doable for sure.

It still requires working with 6 wires, 4 of which are very small, steady hands, good eyes or magnification, etc.

I think you take it for granted some if you are experienced with tools and probably young. Doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be made easier for DIY if its possible (and it was it seems cause the new revision seems better)

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loneoceans wrote:


That’s unfortunate to hear.. Sad If you scroll back in this thread a while back when I got the first proto samples from Neal (the green PCBs), I found the resistors chosen to be non-ideal and made the Aux LEDs far too bright, and specifically requested them to be changed. I think Lumintop probably wanted really bright AUX lights, but that was not what I think they should be because I prefer the AUX LEDs to be very dim.


Personally, my recommended resistor values are:
1.8k for Red and Blue
5.6k for Green


These values allow for a good change in brightness when using the ‘dim’ AUX settings in Anduril as well (especially the breathing rainbow mode which I use most often), and they work really well in the nighttime, but will not be very visible in the daytime. These values are listed in the datasheet on Github too.

It seems that the examples of the values I see here so far for the AUX board resistors are lower than the ones above. I also like the very dim AUX LED’s. I hope the recommended values above will bring very dim like tritium at the low setting and brighter at the high setting as close as to the moon mode.

loneoceans wrote:

There were some issues in the prototype that I need to sort out, though most of them are cosmetic. For example, while electrically the PCB is good, I wasn’t pleased with the overall finish of the PCB soldermask, HASL, and silkscreen. Likewise, there were some component swaps that Neal’s team made to reduce BOM cost, the most obvious is the sense resistor (confusingly a slightly higher value was used). I’m in the process of discussing these with Neal so hopefully we can get an excellent product to everyone. I’m suggesting to Neal to have a matte black soldermask with ENIG gold finish, or at least the same as the stock driver (purple with ENIG) – if you have other opinions please drop a message to Neal as well. 


I was checking around this thread for more about with the AUX board. I just happened to notice something else. The higher value for the sense resistor was used in the prototype. I am guessing the sense resistor is the big one with the “R 020” label. What did the higher value do? Did it simply limit the current even further for the TURBO mode?

contactcr wrote:
Lets move on from 219B. The prototype used it and people have been building them for years.

Yes. It is time to move on from 219B. Indeed, the prototype has been built with them (and several others). There have been no problems. So, my questions now are more for the curiosity. I will go ahead and use 219B.

Thanks.

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@contactcr, Don’t work on them one at a time like through-hole components, work them all at once until the last moment.

1) With a dab of solder flux on your finger, scrub it onto all 4 pads at once.
2) With a small drop of solder on the solder iron tip, brush back-and-forth across all 4 pads at once a few times. Individual older domes will form over each pad. If any of them connect, repeat with less solder on the iron. Wiping perpendicular can fix it too. Eventually they will all have individual domes.
3) Tin each wire by rolling the wire over a solder drop on the iron’s tip.
4) Trim the wires if you stripped and tinned too much.
5) Hold a tinned wire on top of the correct solder dome. Tap with solder iron corner to add heat. The tinned wire should sink into the dome. Repeat for all wires/domes.
6) Done.

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