Petrified Fish Knives

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moderator007
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All the knives I have adjusted the linerlock pressure on so far have been titanium handles with titanium linerlock wth a harden steel insert. The steel linerlocks could be a different story with bending for adjustment. I haven’t tried one yet, but the titanium seems to be pretty forgiving.
Haven’t really had a problem with the linerlock sticking in the lock position, it was more just the pressure it took to actually bend the titanium linerlock out of the way so the blade could pass. The Twosun TS16 and the Green Thorn ZT0456 were both a struggle to push.

Chronovore
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scalpel_ninja wrote:
I usually reserve bending the lock bar as a last resort to adjust action because too much either way can ruin a knife (sometimes permanently)…

It’s also definitely not a good move for novices. I’ve done all kinds of knife maintenance over the years and I recently snapped a lock bar. Shocked

I’m a big fan of the Tangram Santa Fe. I like the Amarillo. So I decided to try the Orion. The one I got had a “wet noodle” detent. It was bad enough that after sharing a video with their customer service, they just refunded me the cost of the knife.

Well, I didn’t want to throw it away. So I decided to try putting some more tension in the lock bar. Whatever steel they use does not want to inelastically deform. It was flexing to a point that seemed extreme but according to my calipers, I wasn’t getting anywhere. Since I was already refunded, I decided to push past what I would normally consider safe. It didn’t just snap. It was like the steel shattered along a stress line, leaving sharp edges which sprung back hard with a reverberating “pang”. Had I not been using pliers and a vice, it could have cut me.

Adahn
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Chronovore wrote:
scalpel_ninja wrote:
I usually reserve bending the lock bar as a last resort to adjust action because too much either way can ruin a knife (sometimes permanently)…

It’s also definitely not a good move for novices. I’ve done all kinds of knife maintenance over the years and I recently snapped a lock bar. Shocked

I’m a big fan of the Tangram Santa Fe. I like the Amarillo. So I decided to try the Orion. The one I got had a “wet noodle” detent. It was bad enough that after sharing a video with their customer service, they just refunded me the cost of the knife.

Well, I didn’t want to throw it away. So I decided to try putting some more tension in the lock bar. Whatever steel they use does not want to inelastically deform. It was flexing to a point that seemed extreme but according to my calipers, I wasn’t getting anywhere. Since I was already refunded, I decided to push past what I would normally consider safe. It didn’t just snap. It was like the steel shattered along a stress line, leaving sharp edges which sprung back hard with a reverberating “pang”. Had I not been using pliers and a vice, it could have cut me.


When I do something like this I take a different route.
I clamp the liner in a vise and put a piece of steel between the lockbar and the rest of the liner to push up the locking arm (if I want to give the lock more strength). The I heat the lockbar relief (or cutout, where the steel bends) with a torch. Usually it’s enough to heat it up until it’s turning slightly bronze.
Let it cool down and it should be good. If you dislike the discoloration you can sand/polish it, acid etch and stonewash it or use Whink Rust and Stain Remover on titanium (beware, it contains hydrofluoric acid, read about it before actually using it).
If the spring is too strong you can put a steel spacer into the locking arm and hold it down with C-clamps. Heat it, let it cool down, should be fine.
Chronovore
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Adahn wrote:
When I do something like this I take a different route. I clamp the liner in a vise and put a piece of steel between the lockbar and the rest of the liner to push up the locking arm (if I want to give the lock more strength). The I heat the lockbar relief (or cutout, where the steel bends) with a torch. Usually it’s enough to heat it up until it’s turning slightly bronze. Let it cool down and it should be good. If you dislike the discoloration you can sand/polish it, acid etch and stonewash it or use Whink Rust and Stain Remover on titanium (beware, it contains hydrofluoric acid, read about it before actually using it). If the spring is too strong you can put a steel spacer into the locking arm and hold it down with C-clamps. Heat it, let it cool down, should be fine.

Thanks for sharing. That’s a good idea. I’ve had luck with simple bending in the past. For instance, it totally made the difference on my Ganzo FH41. This was my first time with a stubborn steel. Next time that happens, I’ll try a torch.

Adahn
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Thank you. Many budget framelock/liner lock knives come with a too weak or strong detent.
I learned the way above after snapping an SRM 710’s locking arm.
Not a big $ loss but it hurts to destroy any useful tool.

I’m wondering when I will find the time and the mood to make the tartan micarta scales for my Boker Urban Trapper, too many other projects atm.
Just saying cos that Urban Trapper needs a slightly stronger detent Wink

Blackbeard
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oil the detent ball as well, this seems to help a lot.

Thro
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Right now i have the 818, 838 and 919.

The 838 is the only one i hade to bend the lock bar a little bit to get it to be nice and snappy.
the 818 and 919 where perfect out of the box.

I also orderd 2 version of the new 949 Warrior with K111 steel.
1 with the blue carbon fiber & 1 Damask pattern G10 Big Smile

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