I was going through some of my old parts

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dchomak
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I was going through some of my old parts

I came across a bunch of old stuff that I had forgotten about. In their day, they were quite popular. If anyone finds this interesting, I will post a pic once in awhile. First up. Does anybody know or remember what this is?

Here i is next to something that is a little more familiar.

And next to an XM-L


Guess what it is and I will post a pic of something else.

zelee
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look like a bulb from my mother ironing Smile

dchomak
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An incandescent at that. What I should be asking is what was (is) it known by.
These can still be purchased.

dave_
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I don’t know what you call those little light bulbs.
When I was little, I always got very excited about buying miniature bulbs at the hobby store.
Thank you for reminding me of that, beautiful pictures! Smile

DBSAR
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very tiny incan. Smile

That Canadian flashlight guy & Lantern Guru -Den / DBSARlight

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That’s like the bulbs used in backlit displays. I have some that are smaller than 3mm LED lighting one display. It reminds me too of EL backlights which were also quite common.

dchomak
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Yes, they were used in a lot of the items you all mention. Medical equipment, model railroad locomotives, panel lights…. But if you were to walk up to a counter at an electronic supply house, what would you ask for?

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I’m not sure if these are the same kind. The ones I have aren’t neon either.

allan d
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We knew them as “grain of wheat bulbs”.

Allan

Helios-
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firefly?
rice?
wheat?


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CyrusAM
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Reminds me of the neon bulbs found in the old type of voltage testers that glowed orange

Socorro Search and RescueI wear my sunglasses at night

dchomak
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allan d wrote:
We knew them as “grain of wheat bulbs”.

How old are you Allan?

These bulbs were used back when there was no other option for a very small light source.

These bulbs are not to be confused with a “Wheat Lamp”, named after it’s inventor, Grant Wheat.
Those lamps were designed for underground mining. Here is the Wikipedia Article on the Wheat Lamp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_lamp

dchomak
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Yes, this is a heat sink. The question is, were was the heat coming from and how was this used.
(I could be wrong, but I don’t think Google will help you on this one.)

texaspyro
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Looks like a heat sink for TO-5 transistors…

Helios-
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Thats a heatsink for the bulb..?


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dchomak
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texaspyro wrote:
Looks like a heat sink for TO-5 transistors…

I thought you might be the one to get it.

Before I posted that pic I searched the Internet as though I didn’t know what it was. I could find nothing. Congratulations on your voluminous knowledge.

I will post another tomorrow.

texaspyro
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dchomak wrote:
Congratulations on your voluminous knowledge.

I also knew what a grain-of-wheat/rice bulbs was… Party

Now what’s this little beastie (BTW, I’ve actual used them before)…

gords1001
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I like this thread.

texaspyro, is your lab full of lightning conductors, knife switches, oscilloscopes and rotary steam balance valves? and do you have an igor?

dave_
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That looks like a mercury rectifier.
Sadly, I had not yet the opportunity to see one in real life.

dchomak
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However, It looks like a lightbulb designed by Benoit Mandelbrot :bigsmile:


Helios- wrote:
Thats a heatsink for the bulb..?

I gotcha! Wink That heatsink does sorta look like a pill for an LED! When I came across that the other day, that is EXACTLY what crossed my mind!

The rules are, before someone can post another pic, the previous pic has to be identified.

allan d
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dchomak wrote:
allan d wrote:
We knew them as “grain of wheat bulbs”.

How old are you Allan?

These bulbs were used back when there was no other option for a very small light source.

I’m 67 years now and have been working with electronics since the mid 1960s.

And the next picture does look like a mercury rectifier. We had many of them in motor speed controls for Navy surplus Monarch lathes.

Allan

TheGloriousTachikoma
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dave_ wrote:
That looks like a mercury rectifier. Sadly, I had not yet the opportunity to see one in real life.

Creepy looking thing, isn’t it? I can’t imagine that they’re terribly durable. It says these were used in electric railroad locomotives… seems like a harzardous cleanup in the event of a collision.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury-arc_valve

Helios-
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Tired For some reason I thought you were saying the heatsink was used with the bulb. As odd as that would be. Of course I was reading things you never said.

Embedding disabled on the Mercury Arc Rectifier video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjMZ5qtyCU


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garrybunk
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dchomak wrote:
These bulbs are not to be confused with a "Wheat Lamp", named after it's inventor, Grant Wheat. Those lamps were designed for underground mining. Here is the Wikipedia Article on the Wheat Lamp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_lamp[/quote]

I believe we have some of those lamps at my company's other office.  They were still being used up until late last year!  I was trying to push them toward a more modern cap lamp so as to drop the weight of that darn big battery on their side!  Here is a pic of the lights and the charging station at our other office (pic taken 1 1/2 to 2 years ago):

1

-Garry

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dchomak
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It amazes me how sometimes “old tech” has an ability to hang in there when you would think something else would replace it.

garrybunk
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Well this is typical in the mining industry (at least this is what I see and hear).  Many things are still done the old fashioned way with old technology.  Even when you try to push the new technology as being better, more productive, less downtime, etc . . . they are still reluctant to change!  My co-workers now use Li-Ion powered LED cap lamps.  I haven't seen them yet, but from what I hear the battery is built into the cap lamp assembly and is charged inside (i.e. battery is not removeable).  I think they only put out about 150 lumens (I couldn't find LED cap lamps certified for u-gnd use which had higher output), but they are rated for over 8 hours continuous use which is the most important consideration.  I would love to see these new ones and see what the beam is like and what the tint is like.  I'm willing to bet it's a very throwy beam with nasty cool white tint!  One of the issues is that sometimes (not all the time) the cap lamps need to be "certified" for use u-gnd and therefore your stuck with what is available! 

-Garry

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dchomak
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I would think the biggest concern in a mine would be sparks. With all that coal dust and perhaps flammable vapors. Lead-acid batteries just don’t sound that safe to me. I would think that what you would want is an integrated light and battery, perhaps hermetically sealed so that there would be no sparks. Charging would be done above ground.

garrybunk
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Well our use is in stone mines, not coal and technically for stone mines we didn't need "certified" lamps but bought them just in case we did end up in a coal mine. Oh, and it's amazing how bright 30 lumens is underground in complete darkness! 

(Sorry if I've taken this thread too far off-topic.)

-Garry

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dchomak
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This should be real easy for some, and a history lesson for others.

It used to be that getting a part like this was very hard to do and expensive. Sure you could go to Radio Shack and buy a consumer version of this part, but even then they were incredibly expensive and no where near the quality or value of these. Almost every electronics project needed them. I was always deprived of this particular type of part………until I found out how to get them – cheap. When I finally got a hold of some, I bought a whole case 24 for $5.00. I just checked eBay, they sell for upwards of $30 each today. It is little wonder that the day I got them I actually went to sleep that night with one of them under my pillow! I absolutely Cherished these. The color, size and shape and most importantly, what they could do.
Here are 2 of them next to a C8 for size. Before the company that manufactured this particular part was sold in 1978, they also manufactured DuraCell batteries!

The questions are:
What is it?
What was it called?
Where was this particular item to be used?
Bonus: Why was I able to get so many of them so cheaply? Hint: 1971

garrybunk
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Hmm . . . looks like a capacitor.  And it looks like ones I used to see in older HiFi stereo receivers.

-Garry

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dave_
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TheGloriousTachikoma wrote:

Creepy looking thing, isn’t it?

Creepy and beautiful at the same time. Smile
For some reason, old tech stuff like that always attracted me.

@dchomak
They look like capacitors, also known as condensers to me.
With some nice screwing terminals. Maybe they were used as start/rum capacitors for some kind of motor (or generator)?

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