alternative fuel camp stoves

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Pulsar
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alternative fuel camp stoves

anyone use these? home made or commercial? i have made a few from not so successful to works pretty decent…

i have been looking at a few commercial. the trangia mini kit is up there, followed by a evernew ti stove, to a vargo triad xe… a few others
if i had the cash a evernew dx or Appalachian kit would be first choice.

but do these commercial burners really provide VFM?

also am interested in wood burning stoves like the bush buddy… anyone have experience in both of these style stoves?

Edited by: sb56637 on 04/07/2013 - 11:04
shiner
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For a small wood burning stove, the Emberlit a good choice. I’ve had one since summer. It’s well designed to burn hot, boil quickly. Lightweight, packs small, flat 5”×7”, easy to setup/takedown. Very sturdy as well.
Because of the smaller sticks that it takes requires near constant attention to keep it going. Although it can certainly handle being jammed full of wood for a nice little raging heater. Sometimes it gets used as our main campfire.

A friend has the Vargo, it’s a bit smaller but he says it doesn’t burn as hot. Different size/shape and ventilation.

Alcohol stoves… these look interesting… MinibullDesign.
No personal experience, other than having watched all his videos. One of those stoves is next on my list. Located in Maine… might be worth looking into.

Don
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I was extraordinarily impressed with the Trangia stoves. They were extremely effective when camping on a glacier where butane stoves just wouldn’t work at all. Alcohol fuel is much less unpleasant than gasoline (petrol) or kerosene (paraffin) fuel when it leaks. And sooner or later, it will.

My experience is hardly current though. That was in 1973….

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Brar
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It is well built with a great design. It burns pretty hot with minimal wood fuel. I prefer wood burners because I can find my fuel source and not have to carry it on me.

Product link

rojos
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Have you tried making a Super Cat yet?

http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/index.html

scaru
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Don wrote:
I was extraordinarily impressed with the Trangia stoves. They were extremely effective when camping on a glacier where butane stoves just wouldn't work at all. Alcohol fuel is much less unpleasant than gasoline (petrol) or kerosene (paraffin) fuel when it leaks. And sooner or later, it will. My experience is hardly current though. That was in 1973....

+1, I have made all of the homemade stove designs out there and none can compare to a triangia. This is recent, I got mine at some point last year and it is still in use. 

kbark
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I’ve been using a regular old cat can alcohol stove for about 3 years. Probably the lightest and cheapest camp stove you can make. I’ve never been a fan of wood burners but they have their merits I guess.

Pulsar
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next time i make some tuna ill have to try it out. ive made various open jet and pressure jet stoves out of soda cans with mixed results
im also planning on making one of these some time soon. looks interesting

kbark
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Tuna? This is BLF, cat food can is cheaper. Smile

Here’s a good link for all kinds of DIY stoves. http://zenstoves.net/

Pulsar
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i dont have a cat, so only can that size is tuna.
and thats why im waiting til i want the tuna, so technically its free lol

ive looked the zen stoves page over a few times in the past. lot of good info

leaftye
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My only alcohol stove is from end2endtrailsupply.  It works well with a methanol or ethanol, but creates a lot of soot with isopropanol.  Wider pots are better (more efficient) though, as with any side jet alcohol stove.  There are a couple wood/alcohol stoves.  There's a Caldera Cone that uses an alcohol stove inside, and should still be able to burn wood.  There's also the Backcountry Boiler that was made to burn wood, but can also be used with an alcohol soaked sponge.  I don't have either of those though as I typically don't backpack with a stove, and cannot justify the cost of yet another expensive stove I won't use.  From what I've read, both are quite good.

The low mode should be lower.

Easy eggplant
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scaru wrote:

+1, I have made all of the homemade stove designs out there and none can compare to a triangia. This is recent, I got mine at some point last year and it is still in use. 

I have made most of the designs as well and you speak the truth about the Trangias. I have an old Swedish Military Trangia and it has never let me down.

It’s heavier, yes, but try accidentally stepping on your superlight Guinness/Redbull stove and see what happens….Snapcracklepopcrunch. Don’t ask how I know.

Then, drive over your Trangia with an ATV and see what happens…..stove laughs

The only downside to the Trangia is the restriction on fuel type. Other than that, you can’t beat a little chunk of brass with no moving parts that will cook your food and boil your water in the bush every time.

asval
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I use this

This one is more expensive, but it charges itself and provides a little charge for anything extra.

http://biolitestove.com/campstove/camp-overview/features/

rojos
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Pulsar wrote:
i dont have a cat, so only can that size is tuna. and thats why im waiting til i want the tuna, so technically its free lol ive looked the zen stoves page over a few times in the past. lot of good info

It works best if you use a 3oz aluminum can - it can be a Fancy Feast cat food can or a Hormel Potted Meat can.  I think most tuna cans are steel and steel cans just don't heat up fast enough.  

Here's some more info on which cans work best: http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/index.html#Materials:

kbark
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Yeah, get the fancy feast and dump it outside. I’m sure something will eat it.

I have found that SLX Alcohol works best. You can find it at Walmart, Lowes, HD or REI.

Pulsar
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asval wrote:
I use this

This one is more expensive, but it charges itself and provides a little charge for anything extra.

http://biolitestove.com/campstove/camp-overview/features/

i have looked at that biolite stove a few times. theres also the power pot … though id like to have both, i dont really see it being a needed item. also you know in the next few years, they will have them being more efficient with higher output

gords1001
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I have one of these:- http://www.google.co.uk/shopping/product/4994813393153721915?hl=en&site=...

It’s no backpacking stove that’s for sure, but it boils a good litre of water in minutes on twigs, comes with a small pan and the bits to let you use it as a cooker and satisfies my inner pyromaniac.

As a day hike solution, it works as you can carry your brewing water in the kettle, and there’s enough water for at least four brews, all you need is some twigs, in England, the wise choice is a dry bag and carry a supply, or as I have done in the past, a few newspaper scrunchies do the job.

In warmer climes, pick your fuel up when you stop.

Pulsar
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those kelly kettles are bad ass. such a simple concept, and works awsome

any one done any run times on there alcohol stoves? i got 7 min 19 sec on 1/2 oz of fuel. stove and alcohol were outside since last night and its 37 out right now… so cold start, and that 1/2 oz included the prime fuel. this was my pressure jet beer can stove. ill try it with my open jet beer can stove later see what times that one gets on 1/2 oz fuel.

just kind of curious

also, lets see some homebrew pix

leaftye
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The Backcountry Boiler I mentioned is a lightweight backpacking variant of the Kelly Kettle.

The low mode should be lower.

Pulsar
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i dont know why i didnt look at that. out of my price range right, but that thing is sweet.

Pulsar
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tested using 1/2 oz of alcohol.

silver one 7:19
short one 8:27

not sure why, im sure theres a lot of factors in play. but i figured the short one would have heated up and vaporized the alcohol faster. both were made exactly the same, except i reamed out the fill hole too much on the short one and cant use a thumb screw, have to use a coin to block the fill hole

edit: temp is now 32, so maybe thats one factor for the longer run time

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I spent almost a month in iceland this summer, cycling and wildcamping most of the time. I wanted to travel ultralight and on a budget, so the homemade stove was a must, and it really paid off. No moving parts, no fancy things, therefore extremely reliable. Mine got a lot of bumps but it survived and still working. It is the model made of heineken cans, but since it’s so light (under 20 grs.), I took a smaller one as backup, made with redbull cans. Another advantage is that they’re so small i could pack them inside the steel mugs we used for eating and drinking. Had i used a wood one, i’d be dead from starvation… Wink I don’t like gas burners either, because they’re bulkier, and have higher fail rates (and it’s not always easy to know calculate how much fuel is left, or to find spare cartridges depending on where you are.
Ethanol is my choice for fuel . less soot than other stuff i used. Plus, you only need to carry a tiny amount of fuel if you’re travelling alone or for a short time. Plus, once you make the first one, you are able to make a new one on the track, using just a multitool, or knife and those cans that lay around. Plus… i love it! :bigsmile:

shiner
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any links to homemade alcohol can stove instructions?
using a multi-tool to convert a can to stove sounds interesting.

oh, I see the alu bottle link now…

Pulsar
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kbark wrote:
Tuna? This is BLF, cat food can is cheaper. Smile

Here’s a good link for all kinds of DIY stoves. http://zenstoves.net/

check out that link too.

Flacomuchacho
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I did a lot of research and the best and most comprehensive page i found is this one: http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/

Pulsar
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just got my trangia mini kit, very slightly used for $25 shipped… this thing burns good. puts all the ones i made to shame.
boiled some water on it already, and think ill heat some beans and fry an egg on it later. know these alcohol stoves are mainly for boiling water… but gotta try it

Fred
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The homemade pop can stoves are great fun to build for sure (also made several with mixed results) but since they are less fuel efficient than a traniga they will burn off the weight difference rather quickly. You get lowered reliability and have to carry more fuel … thats why I never really saw the point in using them. A titanium version of the trangia stove would be the best of two worlds, but they are a bit too pricy to save 70 or so grams in the backpack

Pulsar
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the evernew burner is titanium, and pretty damn close to a trangia clone. doesnt have a cap though. like you said, it is pricey. i think i have seen them on ebay for a bit under $50, for just the burner

Fred
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Alcohol as a fuel is good all around, and dont forget that they are not limited to denatured camping alcohol. I mainly burn 96% medical alcohol in them, a lot easier to find in off grid countries, and a lot cheaper. Trangias are useful for more than boiling water as well, it is possible to use them as your single means for preparing food.

Pulsar
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i dug out my 1975 coleman 425E stove yesterday while i was at my dads. the generator and all was gummed/clogged up. so i drained the years old fuel, filled it with acetone, and pressured it up and ran it through the system. to my surprise it ran on it. i ran it about 10 mins on acetone. it actually ran pretty decent on it, and it actually ran much better afterwards.

but if it will run on acetone, i imagine it will run on alcohol. not sure how the seals, pacing and all will like it, but i may have to try.

baterija
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Pulsar wrote:
boiled some water on it already, and think ill heat some beans and fry an egg on it later. know these alcohol stoves are mainly for boiling water… but gotta try it

Did you get the simmering ring in your kit? I got mine used on ebay minus the ring so I haven’t actually used one. It looks handy and seems to work from everything I’ve heard.

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