Where can i put my 18650 batteries, in the fridge? or it's bad for health of food in the fridge?

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xatu
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Where can i put my 18650 batteries, in the fridge? or it's bad for health of food in the fridge?

Hello everybody.

Where can i put my 18650 batteries, in the fridge? or it's bad for health of food in the fridge?.

Where do you save your 18650 batteries?

 

thanks.

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Davx
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Why you have to put them in the fridge?? I know that storing a fully charged Li-Ion battery at high temperatures is not a good idea and will also cause a noticeable decline in capacity but you can simply put them in a box (DX sell specific box) in a fresh place. 15 °C (60°F) are enough. The best thing would be store them when they're about half charged.

Fridge is not a bad solution but you have to front some problem (humidity for example).

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Davx wrote:

Fridge is not a bad solution but you have to front some problem (humidity for example).

+1

The only solution that comes in mind is using this type of case/holder :~

Hobbyfotograaf
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The air inside a fridge is very dry, because all the moisture will condensate against the evaporator (the cooling element). If you take the cold battery out of the fridge, then the moisture from the warmer air in your home can make the batteries wet. To prevent that, just let the batteries warm up in a plastic bag.

I store lithium-ion and Nimh batteries in the fridge (14500, 18650 and camera batteries) in the fridge to slow down the chemical processes inside. Maybe they will last longer this way.

xatu
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The problem is that i can't get a place in my house of 15º C. Now, in next summer inside my house in a fresh room the temperature is about 30º. Outside between 40º-45º C (i saw more than 50º C even).

Then, for me is imposible get 15º C even with an a/c on. For that i thought in the fridge, but it isn't the best place for store the batteries...

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okwchin
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You can prevent condensation issues by shorting the battery in the fridge for a minute before taking them out. It warms them up a little before you take them out Wink

 

(*sarcasm off* Please don't do that. Its not smart)

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Fridge is ok. Just put them inside an airtight container (plastic bag, small plastic box etc) and put a small bag of silica gel inside it with the batteries and you should be good to go. When taking the batteries out from fridge, let them warm in room temperature for a while before opening the container they're in.

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sirnic
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I store mine in the jar of mayonnaise in the fridge.

Keeps the batteries cool but the mayo sure tastes funny!!  Surprised

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Mustard is better.  Taste stays the same.

 

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I was keeping mine in the fridge but now its cooling down I will probably take them out and leave them in a drawer.

 

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Why are some even bothered to store the batteries carefully? Use them, use them some more and dispose when they are worn out and does not hold much charge anymore. These are consumables not collectibles. Smile

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There's no point at all in storing you rechargable batteries in the fridge, you'll be creating more potential problems for no gain.

Non-rechargable lithium batteries do have a longer shelf life when stored at a low temperature, but for rechargable batteries how long they can sit with a full charge is not something to worry about anyway.

You want to store them somewhere dry, where they can't short, out of the sun and if you want to take extra measures in something fireproof.

30C isn't a temperature you need to worry about for the batteries.

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The higher the temperature, the faster lithium ion lose capacity.

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Does anyone know what the typical shelf life of 18650's. I recently purchased a bunch that will probably not get a lot of use. 

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atbglenn wrote:

Does anyone know what the typical shelf life of 18650's. I recently purchased a bunch that will probably not get a lot of use. 

You're probably not going to find any hard data on that since it varies from cell to cell and depends heavily on a lot of factors (some of which are beyond your control). Until a few years ago, manufacturers used to toss around the "10 year shelf-life" claim a lot.

My personal take on this (and I am not a battery expert) is that it's just not worth worrying about. If you buy an electric car or need to use 18650s for some sort of industrial application, sure. But for what most of us do, it really doesn't matter because you're still going to get years of shelf-life out of any undamaged 18650 cell if you don't abuse them. 18650s have become really cheap anyway - if a cell dies after a year or two, I really don't care too much, even if they should last longer.

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Is this a date code on the CGR18650D Panasonic's I just bought. I'm curious if these are new, or NOS. 

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atbglenn wrote:

Does anyone know what the typical shelf life of 18650's. I recently purchased a bunch that will probably not get a lot of use. 

Depends on charge and temperature.

High temperature (20-40C) kills li-ion cells faster than lower temps (5-20C). Storing li-ion cells discharged damages them quickly, storing them full is better but storing them at 60-70% charge (~3.9-4.0V) is even better.

Best is a combination of optimum temperatures and charge state.

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Totally off-topic, but that is an interesting photo with a very narrow DOF (Depth of Field). Plus there almost appears to be something written in the base, just low an left of the battery.

atbglenn wrote:

Is this a date code on the CGR18650D Panasonic's I just bought. I'm curious if these are new, or NOS. 

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The low depth of field was done on purpose. If you believe that, I have a bridge I'll sell you Smile To be perfectly honest I just zoomed in with my 18 to 55mm kit lens (Nikon D40 body) and took the shot in the "program" mode. I'm no expert in photography.

As far as seeing anything written near the base of the battery, I can't see it??? 

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Back on topic, what is the purpose of storing them half-charged? If I need them I want them fully charged, especially if I have 10 sitting around waiting for some dang comet or brown dwarf star to whiz by and flip the earth's magnetic poles.

Rats, finally sold my 2010 509hp Mustang...now I can buy more lights!

Sold the red one too! Now guess what I drive, doing my penance for 500 hp commuters...

http://dreammustang.com/

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Take beer out of my fridge to make room for batteries?  I would lose my Canadian citizenship for such travesty.

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trooplewis wrote:

Back on topic, what is the purpose of storing them half-charged? If I need them I want them fully charged, especially if I have 10 sitting around waiting for some dang comet or brown dwarf star to whiz by and flip the earth's magnetic poles.

Ever wonder why brand new cells does not come 100% charged? It usually makes no sense for consumers/users to store them at less than full charge, retailers and such on the other hand...

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Its highly variable , but cells do degrade with or without use ..

Initial quality will dictate deterioration rate ..

Storing cells within a certain temp range will extend there shelf life ...

Extreme cold , at or bellow 0 deg C and extreme heat 45Deg C + will shorten shelf life ...

By how much ????

Some of my 18650 are up to 3 years old , and shortly I will test the oldest cells I have to see how they have stood up to the test of time ..

New cells are not fully charged as cell degradation is less when the battery is around 50% or 60% capacity .

 

 

 

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If you can find the original (not abstract) of this http://www.electrochem.org/dl/ma/204/pdfs/0253.PDF it probably has more relevant data.

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old4570
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that PDF was a tease !

 Always remember , the easiest thing in the world to do , is to expel hot air from your lungs and through some vocal chords ..
The resulting sound may , or may not be worth listening too ….

 

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While I'm sure there is truth to keeping batteries stored in cooler temps is beneficial, I have not witnessed an issue and I store many of my lights and cells in the garage. Right now it is 100 degrees F in my garage (about 38C). In the cooler months it can still be 80 degrees in the garage. I have RCR123A cells that are 4 years old and still take a charge just fine after being stored in that heat. When I have cells that do die, I just buy more.

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