What is a BOB, GHB or EDC? What goes in one? And why the heck would I want one anyway?

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Deputydave
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What is a BOB, GHB or EDC? What goes in one? And why the heck would I want one anyway?

For those into emergency preparedness. I’ve included a lot of content and just posted one of my personal (primary) EDC’s.

What is a BOB, GHB or EDC? What goes in one? And why the heck would I want one anyway?

Survival & Emergency Preparedness http://sepboard.us

travis
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BOB is a “Bug Out Bag”

-basically a smallish, prepacked kit of Emergency Preparedness Essentials to grab when “ the shit hits the fan”

-Here in California, I have an Earthquake Kit. Some might have Other disaster preparedness items, or Zombie Apocalyse bag with ammo etc. Smile

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I’ve been doing some more work on my disaster bag this week. I just setup and sealed the new tent to make sure it’s something we’ll be able to use in an emergency. As an engineer, my motto is “if you haven’t tested it, then it doesn’t work” so I make sure to to know my capabilities beforehand. At the end of the world, we’ll be warm and dry.

My bag has a few items I am proud of, such as the WakaWaka solar lamp & USB charger, the 2,400 calorie food bars and the Mora Light My Fire. I’ve probably got a grand or so into it and haven’t spared any expense so far. Being a flashaholic, the bag features efficient Olight I3S 1xAAA and L10 XP-G2 1xAA flashlights, as well as a Crelant headlamp. All the batteries in the bag are lithium primaries with nice, long shelf lives. I’ve also been working on an EMT type trauma bag which has its own cubby in the disaster bag for quick access.

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      If survival means I have to live with those lights then kill me now !

 I wouldn't put a sk68 in a bug out bag...My life is worth more than that ... and a 3AAA maglite would mean I'm dead already and went to flashlight hell .

       καὶ τὸ φῶς ἐν τῇ σκοτίᾳ φαίνει καὶ ἡ σκοτία αὐτὸ οὐ κατέλαβεν

                            

       Dc-fix diffuser film  >…  http://budgetlightforum.com/node/42208

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Sorry.. I would never put SK68 on my disaster bag, a lot of people didn’t realize how much you need a bright flashlight when SHTF,
Most are not prepare nor realize in time of disaster, you can’t just grab any light to search other family members in the darkness.
When you can’t see your own hand in front of you in the darkness.
You want something floody and bright, something like SRK variants or MT-G2 lights or best something like TR-J18 or 9T6.

I’ve been recommending TR-J18 to most of my friends whose willing to listen, unfortunately for most non flasholics spending $50 on light not including the batteries is madness to them. Silly
I’ll put one of my AA lights ( sunwayman D40A,F40A, Nitecore EA4 or EA8) for back up in my bag.

And if somebody tell me they’re going to the deep wood with Sk68? I’ll tell them good luck! because you’re going to need one.
Heck.. sometimes when I do my night walk after dinner I always carry at least 3 lights with the minimum of a C8 :bigsmile:

Usually I carry C8, SRK variants and/or Fenik TK75, TK61, TK51, Nitecore TM26 and maybe an MT-G2 light( lately I’ve been carrying Niwalker MM15, my favorite light for walking so far ) in my bag

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chenko
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BOB needs to watch for weight too, since the ability to march many kms with the luggage is important.
No need for lots of lumens, a 1xAA or 2xAA make enough nowadays and will be easy(er) to find batteries for those in an emergency.
I’m not putting any li-ion wizardry in my BOB, while it has its way in my EDC.

I layered to the extent that I have levels of gear and supplies from the on-person level to evacuation plans for exteded periods: pockets – EDC man purse – EDC backpack – toolbags/supplies/resources-stash for home (bug-in) or evacuation (bug-out).

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chenko wrote:
BOB needs to watch for weight too, since the ability to march many kms with the luggage is important.
It’s surprising how few people consider this! I have a friend who brags about his huge hoards of stuff like ammo, ham radios and pallets (seriously) of bottled water, and seems to think “Bug Out” = “Hunker Down In Place”…

Easiest way (the Dimbo way) to test your equipment: GO CAMPING. Even if it’s in your own back yard. If you can’t survive a weekend with just the contents of your BOB, how do you expect to survive some “Zombie Apocalypse”? In your own back yard, consider “open the kitchen door” = “fail”.

Quote:
No need for lots of lumens, a 1xAA or 2xAA make enough nowadays and will be easy(er) to find batteries for those in an emergency.
Uh… No it won’t. When the Zombies raid all the local stores for snacks, they’ll probably clear the shelves of batteries for their electronic toys at the same time.

You don’t believe in Zombies? Look at all of them driving down the road thumbing their “smart” phones!

Quote:
I’m not putting any li-ion wizardry in my BOB
There you go being Brilliant again! The rechargeable LiIons are for EDC, I keep all my Primary Lithiums (beLIEving in the “10-year shelf life” claims) in places where I may need them “someday”. That will get me “out there”, and then the ability to keep the LiIons recharged w/o the electric company will keep me “out there”.

Quote:
I layered to the extent that I have levels of gear and supplies
BEST tip of the Thread, IMNERHO. “Y2K” or “Zombie Apocalypse” or whatever disaster you fear, if you can’t scale your response to the threat, you probably will just end up dead in a ditch somewhere.

“There is no darkness but ignorance.”

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Appreciate the responses and hope everyone is enjoying the thread so far. It is a work in progress as I get time.

In regards to the SK68, I understand the concern(s) but in my experience it is a non-issue. The Sipik in my EDC, as I explained in the last post in the BOB thread is just one of the lights in a three-layer approach. And to be fair, I have taken in to the deep woods on remote camping trips and its worked quite well. And again, it was just one in a series of layers. I would never rely on just one light whether it cost $3 or $300. Two is one and one is none, simple as that. As Dimbo stated, gear needs to be field tested under less than ideal conditions. Remote/primitive camping in the deep woods works well towards that goal. And like I said, the Sipik worked quite well. So does the ML XL50 and even the ROV LED. All have their uses and levels of light.

In an emergency situation, bright light can be a benefit…or a detriment depending on the emergency. And too be honest, in a prolonged situation I’ll take long run time over mega-lumens. Just need enough lumens to get the job done, whatever it might be. If the 6 lumen ROV LED gets the job done then I don’t need to use the 300 lumen Sipik or one of the 1000 lumen 18650 lights I have.

That is the layered approach to a BOB/GHB or EDC. Have several, have several levels of lighting and several functions i.e. H/M/L/strobe etc. Have spare batteries with emphasis on batteries that can be stored long term as well as good rechargeables.

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Deputydave
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Some additional EDC’s from various folks:

EDC (Every Day Carry) – picture thread

Some GHB’s:

GHB

Smile

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aoeu
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Hmm, have never needed these things. I’m glad I live in a place that is pretty boring in terms of extreme weather or natural disaster. Worst thing that can happen is the clothes on the line get wet !

Deputydave
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You’ve never needed a flashlight? Or had a flat tire? Or needed a drink of water? Or been in a situation that didn’t go as planned?

Items such as described in the various links above are about preventing or mitigating a possible situation before it happens. From the inconvenient to the actual emergency. Weather is just one possible consideration in the equation.

Always be prepared.

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koyotee
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Ghb is a drug Smile

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Well regarding my everyday needs/lifestyle:
Flat tyre – car has the tools already.
Flashlight – phone has one, phone goes with me everywhere. (If I’m trekking it’s a different story).
Water – well I live in a highly urbanised area. Water is not an issue ever.

I understand some people should be carrying these BOB GHB stuff, but it’s truly not needed where I’m from.

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koyotee wrote:
Ghb is a drug Smile

some people get so obsessed with their GHB it becomes an addiction just like a drug Big Smile

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Kodachrome40
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Deputydave wrote:
Some additional EDC’s from various folks:

EDC (Every Day Carry) – picture thread

Some GHB’s:

GHB

Smile
Interesting links, I enjoyed checking out the pages. I firmly believe vast majority of people (myself included Sad ) grossly underestimate their needs and are completely unprepared for most emergencies.
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It seems to me a 2xAA light is your best bet for finding batteries, but they aren’t the brightest.

My problem comes from, how do you charge li-ion after they die if you have no power anywhere. Relying on solar can be quite unreliable. I want a dynamo of some sort that I can charge my batteries with but don’t seem to find much. (Think Metro 2033)

All bicycle dynamos are 12v output which doesn’t help. I’d love to have my bicycle at infrastructure’s end.

chenko
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Get a cheap portable inverter to convert 12v to 120v or 240v AC. I got a 150w I keep on my adventure motorbike resources for longer trips, for about 20€. It also has built in USB output.

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I hear they have pretty low efficiencies? Especially when I’m talking about a bicycle Wink

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aoeu wrote:
Well regarding my everyday needs/lifestyle:

Perhaps that’s the issue you’re not understanding? We’re not talking about everyday needs, though these types of kits/packs/bags can address a things with a few handy items. We’re discussing items to prevent or mitigate unexpected circumstances.

Quote:
Flat tyre – car has the tools already.

That’s good, it is a start. But there are many other situations that could arise while out-and-about that would be prudent to address.

Quote:
Water – well I live in a highly urbanised area. Water is not an issue ever.

It isn’t an issue as long as the electricity is still flowing and the water hasn’t been compromised. Dependance on the infrastructure however isn’t the first, best option.

Quote:
I understand some people should be carrying these BOB GHB stuff, but it’s truly not needed where I’m from.

With respect, I cannot agree with your conclusion(s). Your depending upon a system that is man-made and can and does fail. India was a good example just a short time ago when part of their power grid collapsed and 100 million were without power for an extended time period. Storms happen. Contamination of water supplies from a myriad of circumstances can and does occur. People have to evacuate their home or get stranded on the open road. Roads wash out or are filled with debris making them impassible for a period of time. In short, stuff happens beyond our control. Dependance upon technology or others to fulfill your needs isn’t a sound strategy. Nice to have, but they don’t trump self reliance and a sound game plan. BOB/GHB/EDC are needed every place and any place. But as the ole saying goes, ‘you can lead an elephant to water but you can’t push one in’. Big Smile

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Deputydave
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TheFlasher wrote:
It seems to me a 2xAA light is your best bet for finding batteries, but they aren’t the brightest.

My problem comes from, how do you charge li-ion after they die if you have no power anywhere. Relying on solar can be quite unreliable. I want a dynamo of some sort that I can charge my batteries with but don’t seem to find much. (Think Metro 2033)

All bicycle dynamos are 12v output which doesn’t help. I’d love to have my bicycle at infrastructure’s end.

An option is to buy or DIY your own solar powered generator that uses a deep cell marine battery. These can charge phones and batteries, run a computer, light or fan as well as radios etc.

Another option is to buy a power inverter to run from your car battery. More fuel efficient than a generator and much quieter.

Either or both can help you get through a shorter period of time without power and provide a level of comfort.

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Deputydave
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Kodachrome40 wrote:
Deputydave wrote:
Some additional EDC’s from various folks:

EDC (Every Day Carry) – picture thread

Some GHB’s:

GHB

Smile
Interesting links, I enjoyed checking out the pages. I firmly believe vast majority of people (myself included Sad ) grossly underestimate their needs and are completely unprepared for most emergencies.

Thank you, glad you’ve enjoyed those threads. I agree. According to one report I’ve seen, less than 10% of folks are prepared for any sort of emergency situation. That is a pretty lousy statistic if true. But unfortunately I can see it being pretty close to being spot on accurate. Self reliance has given way in many cultures/countries to relying on others (usually a government) to supply all of the needs. Becoming a bit more prepared isn’t really all that difficult. Here is a thread that may be of interest to those that haven’t prepared for ‘stuff’ and really aren’t sure how:

Your advice to someone new to prepping

It’s important to note that I’m not talking about crazy stuff like aliens invading or zombies attacking. Storms happen. Wild fires happen. Mud slides and earthquakes and flat tires in the middle of nowhere happen. I usually suggest to folks to start simple. Play the ‘what if’ game;

What if…

  • The power goes out for a few days (for whatever reason i.e. storm, power plant malfunctions, earthquake busts up the lines or whatever). Happens to people all the time. So if the power was to go out for a few days…what would/could you do to make life a bit easier? If the power goes out then the water will eventually stop flowing. So do you have enough water to last a few days? Enough food? A way to prepare the food? A way to clean the dishes? A bit of light at night?
  • The car breaks down and you’re not close to any type of civilization? Cell phone is great, but what if you’re out of juice/phone breaks/phone is lost/no coverage? Could be something as simple as tossing a comfortable pair of shoes in the trunk and some socks in case you need to hoof it a mile or two (and your wearing high heels or dress shoes). Could be a bit of water to stay hydrated. Could be something as simple as a mylar space blanket if you’re in a colder climate to keep you warm till help arrives.

Doesn’t take tons of money or time and can actually be a fun family project to do some planning and preparing. And it gives you a nice sense of confidence. If you never need any of the stuff or planning then feel blessed. And if you do need it, you’ll be glad you had some stuff. Smile

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aoeu wrote:
Well regarding my everyday needs/lifestyle:
Flat tyre – car has the tools already.
Flashlight – phone has one, phone goes with me everywhere. (If I’m trekking it’s a different story).
Water – well I live in a highly urbanised area. Water is not an issue ever.

I understand some people should be carrying these BOB GHB stuff, but it’s truly not needed where I’m from.

I’m a little more adventurous than some, and like to drive the back roads and explore, I would need my stuff if I lived where you live.

Here is an Australian prepper, I would love to totally redo his BOB for him, but at least he has something.

The terrible ifs are accumulating.
aoeu
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Deputydave wrote:
With respect, I cannot agree with your conclusion(s). Your depending upon a system that is man-made and can and does fail. India was a good example just a short time ago when part of their power grid collapsed and 100 million were without power for an extended time period. Storms happen. Contamination of water supplies from a myriad of circumstances can and does occur. People have to evacuate their home or get stranded on the open road. Roads wash out or are filled with debris making them impassible for a period of time. In short, stuff happens beyond our control. Dependance upon technology or others to fulfill your needs isn’t a sound strategy. Nice to have, but they don’t trump self reliance and a sound game plan. BOB/GHB/EDC are needed every place and any place. But as the ole saying goes, ‘you can lead an elephant to water but you can’t push one in’. Big Smile

I’m happy to contribute to this debate.

India is perhaps the poorest example of why I should need emergency gear in Australia and not just because it’s an entirely different country. I was in India last year, spent a month there riding a motorbike through the Himalayas. Sub zero temps, ice, snow, mud, river crossings. Did I prep for that? Yep, I paid for a support van full of tools, water, beer, and food. Done deal. That’s all I needed. I didn’t need fire starters, water tablets, or any of that. I spent 2 weeks in Delhi too, power outages were common and expected. They have generators everywhere. If I needed anything I could pay a kid $1 to go get it for me. Anything was within an arm’s reach. They had some of the best guavas I’ve ever tasted there, pretty shit pizza, and forget about cleanliness. No matter what happens to the infrastructure in India, you can bet that there is someone within 10m who can offer you a solution if you pay them, and if not, there is someone within 20m who can take you to a solution.

But anyway, I don’t live there. Where I live, the longest my power has ever been out is 5 hours and I didn’t die of thirst, have a burning desire for a torch, or start to starve. The worst storm i’ve encountered in my life was hail that smashed the tiles on my roof – this was 20 years ago. It was cold, there was hail in my kitchen, but I stepped over it to reach the fridge. My water supply has never been contaminated, ever. My water has been safe to drink straight from the tap since forever. Roads have been flooded once or twice but you just pull over and relax until its gone. With infrastructure downtime of .00001%, I very well can rely on it.

This is my life, and the life of the majority of people in my city. I and my parents have lived like this for decades without issue. If you are telling me I still need these emergency supplies, then I respectfully tell you that you need to understand the principles of risk management. In short, _I don’t need to make preparations for an event that is extremely extremely unlikely to happen. You should focus more on risks that are more likely to happen.

Now Dave, you find it within yourself that you should prepare for these emergencies by prepping emergency bags, and I completely respect that because I don’t know your lifestyle. Please allow me to respectfully ask you a question. Have you prepared for the most likely scenarios which will kill you? Do you know what those scenarios are? It’s not natural disaster, flood, or any of that. More than half of deaths in America are from lifestyle diseases like cardiovascular disease and cancer. The top killers of Americans are things which can not be prevented by emergency gear. When a child is born, it’s basically a coin toss on whether or not it will die from health complications. Preventing these things should be your daily focus.

Even in the worst natural disaster/city meltdown possible, you are of no worth to anyone around you if you aren’t healthy enough to help yourself because you’ve got a diseased body.

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LOL, who needs self sufficiency when they have a support van following them and eat their vegetables.

I don’t travel that way.

The terrible ifs are accumulating.
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Bort wrote:
koyotee wrote:
Ghb is a drug Smile
some people get so obsessed with their GHB it becomes an addiction just like a drug Big Smile

It really is a drug Smile http://www.drugs.com/ghb.html

Finaly, proud owner of a Powerex Maha mh c-9000 for my Eneloops:)

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aoeu wrote:
I’m happy to contribute to this debate.

I’m sorry you see this as a debate. It isn’t.

Quote:

If I needed anything I could pay a kid $1 to go get it for me.

It seems you depend on others for quite a bit sir. Will this kid be there to fetch you things in an emergency situation? If you’re counting on that then, well…I don’t like your chances. I’m glad nothing has really happened to you in your life, hope that continues. But to depend on that is folly and I will submit, not a wise move.

I prefer to enjoy the benefits of technology, put have a sound back up plan with the knowledge, experience and gear to prevent or mitigate a situation should it happen. I like the idea of working toward self reliance and not having to depend on someone else to do something I really should have done myself. Or depending on them being there in a situation where frankly they won’t be there.

Quote:

Please allow me to respectfully ask you a question. Have you prepared for the most likely scenarios which will kill you?

Actually, yes I have. In the majority of emergency situations the three most common means of death, beside the actual possible trauma of the event itself, are hypothermia, hyperthermia and dehydration. I have these three things covered in addition to other contingencies.

If you want to discuss health related matters, which isn’t part of the purpose of this or the other threads then you’re making an apple and oranges comparison. Personally, I work out, eat a good diet (which means I don’t drink sodas, don’t eat fried food or pork, don’t smoke, don’t drink, don’t do drugs, don’t eat things with hydrogenated fats/trans fats, have my own fruit and vegetable garden and purify my water). Will everyone do so? Nope. Just as not everyone will prepare themselves for an emergency situation. Basically it is prudent life choices and not everyone will make them.

Emergency situations happen to real people, in real life on a daily basis. One can ignore that and depend on others to supply their needs or one can make a choice to have a basic plan in place. If one feels they don’t need to prepare then they simply don’t need to read and/or participate in the threads I’ve started or linked. It would be a pointless waste of their time since as I’ve mentioned, this isn’t a debate. It is information provided to those that are interested.

With respect. Smile

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i have a pack with most of the above in it.
space blankets
energy granola bars.
2qt water bottle.
meds.my specific prescriptions and ibuprofen,diphenhydramine antihistamine,triple antibiotic,immodium,aspirin,iodine,ect.
3 assorted mre.
several swiss army/multitools
an arc-aaa and several energizer lithium aaa.
an arc-ls and 8 energizer lithium aa.
4 aaa and 8 aa eneloops.
55w folding solar panel.folds about 10“square.morningstar charge controller velcroed in the wrap.
7ah agm battery.
duracell 30 minute aaa aa charger.
12v cellphone charger.micro and mini usb cable.
an icom q7a 2m/70cm transciever.has general coverage recieve and can do frs,gmrs,murs as well as amateur.runs from 2 aa.
so same stash of batts serves it too.
a compass.
fire starter kit and several 35mm film cans of tinder and vasilene soaked cotton.a bic lighter to cheat.its still flint and steel ;-).
cheap raincoat that can fit in ones pocket.
now not everyone is going to want all this to carry in a pack but i have no problem.
only items here that need periodic attention is water,agm battery,and the energy bars.
rotate/recharge,refill as needed.i find that the water is ok if i add 2-3 drops of unscented bleach as i fill it.
energy bars are handy anyway and get grabbed regularly so replenished often.
every 2 months i plug the battery into the anderson powerpole outlet on my ups and let it float overnight.
these connectors are standard for ares/amateur radio emergency services.
all 12v stuff i own has these.

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koyotee wrote:
Bort wrote:
koyotee wrote:
Ghb is a drug Smile
some people get so obsessed with their GHB it becomes an addiction just like a drug Big Smile

It really is a drug Smile http://www.drugs.com/ghb.html


My post was sarcasm, i am a bit of a prepper as well, though ironically i moved into a new place, it was the beginning of winter and i thought about the biggest emergencies being no heat, no electricity and no water. I always have some potable water available, always have food, lights and laptop (and car) for electricity, but lighting is the most important, charcoal and natural gas for cooking (in winter though thats tough, i would avoid cooked food especially meat in an emergency because monoxide is deadly and cooking outside is too cold), food can be stored outside in animal safe locations so frozen food won’t spoil, but no backup for heat. 3 months later the furnace dies so the only thing i didn’t have a backup for was toast on the tail end of -30ºC.
Fortunately it was only about -10ºC for the 4 days it took to get it repaired. Heat in winter is a hard to store commodity.

The Journal of Alternative Facts TM

"It is critical that there is a credible academic source for the growing and important discipline of alternative facts. This field of study will just keep winning, and we knew that all the best people would want to be on board. There is a real risk in the world today that people might be getting their information about science from actual scientists"

 

 

 

Deputydave
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Location: Florida
snakebite wrote:
fire starter kit and several 35mm film cans of tinder and vasilene soaked cotton.a bic lighter to cheat.its still flint and steel ;-).

I like your list. The fire starter kit caught my eye as that is an area I’m really drawn to. We do a lot of remote camping and I like to be really redundant in the area of fire starting and tinder. If it’s of any interest to you, our groups been using this for quite a while and it is outstanding:

DIY Firestarter Wafer – w/video

DIY Fuel Tabs – w/videos

And for the vasaline and cotton, here’s a neat idea that we also use that is a bit more compact than the film cans (which I use to use prior to these other ways).

DIY fire straws

Smile

Survival & Emergency Preparedness http://sepboard.us

Dimbo The Blinky
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Deputydave wrote:
Emergency situations happen to real people, in real life on a daily basis.
I beg to differ. Emergency situations only happen to clueless people who refuse to consider Risk Assessments and wander past the “Here There Be Dragons” lines without paying attention to their surroundings or situation.

To the rest of us, Crisis Situations are merely entertaining diversions from the day-to-day drudgery of Life.

As for me, one of the most rewarding things I do is to take little buckaroos out & show them how to kill, cook and eat the dragons.

And why doesn’t anybody hear about us?? Because “… and then he solved all his problems with the stuff he had brought along “just in case” & saved himself and his family” makes for a boring-ass news story!

But of course that just concurs with all you’ve said…

“There is no darkness but ignorance.”

Dimbo The Blinky
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Deputydave wrote:
We do a lot of remote camping and I like to be really redundant in the area of fire starting and tinder.
Not shilling, but consider making your lanyards, zipper pulls and key fobs out of Tarred Hemp, (or Tarred Cotton if you’re a hater and believe hemp is evil)…

It smells WONDERFUL and can be teased apart to make some very dandy Tinder…

Also, Rayon cloths (“dew-rags”) in your BOB make dandy fires, even though they suck at everything else you’d want a cloth for…

Just putting that out there…

“There is no darkness but ignorance.”

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