D.I.Y. Illuminated tailcap

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gchart
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Not typically, no. Turning on the switch creates a direct path for current to flow through the tail. Between an LED and the switch, the path of least resistance would be the switch and the LED wouldn’t get any/enough current flow.

That could be done with an e-switch light though.

NeutralFan
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I wanted to have 1 more color for a lighted tailcap. This time I mean it – no more after this! I have all the normal colors (blue, green, white, red, orange) and some other colors (pink, warm white, cool blue). Yellow looks great, but is a bad choice since it’s so inefficient. I’ve tried purple/UV and yellow/green, but also found out they are very inefficient.

So I decided to make my own color. I tried dual colors, like pink on 1 side and green on the other, but I prefer to have just 1 color. I eventually ended up with mixing green and blue to make aqua. Green is the most efficient by far so I wanted to incorporate it, and blue is pretty good too. I actually have 3 different types of blues, so I picked the 1 that created the best color of aqua.

Here’s how I mixed the green and blue. Since green is so efficient, I had to double the resistance (22 Kiloohms + 22 Kiloohms) on the green 0805 SMD LEDs vs the blue. I ended up with 0.15 milliamps at 4.1 volts.

The left picture is the best I can do to show how the aqua looks (middle top) and the right is all of my custom lighted tailcaps (aqua again is middle top).

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

gchart
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Looks great! I love me some flashlight bling.

NeutralFan
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Thanks gchart!

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

djozz
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Haha, I have done all the things that you have done too NeutralFan, including fiddling with resistors for finetuning the balances.

To challenge your “no more after this”, on aliexpress, with some searching, you will find 0603 leds of several tints aqua and cyan (I have 480nm, 490nm, 500nm) that are genuine single colour leds (not phosfor- converted) and are fairly efficient so suitable for lighted tails. Also a phosfor-converted aqua can be found (blue led mixed with some green emitting phosfor) that is really efficient.

NeutralFan
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Thanks for the info djozz! I’ll have to look for those tiny LEDs, but look just for the sake of curiosity. Wink

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

oweban
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I think I’m beating my head into a wall on this, but is there a simple way to get the lighted tailcap visible through the metal S2+ switches? I’m trying to get lights behind a purple host.

Ideally it’d be quite dim, even in pitch black – it’s for my daughter’s bedside table, just so she has a point of reference to grab it. I do want to change the colours though, so I realise there’s probably different resistances needed.

I got some of the lit tailcap boards from Convoy, but they’re nigh-on-invisible through the cap. I tried removing the resistors and just joining the path, and they flash bright momentarily, then go back to exactly the same brightness they were with the resistors on.

If it gets too hard I’m happy to buy something else, but l4p is down, and I (to be honest) haven’t yet checked if Lexel is still doing them.

moderator007
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Did you install a bleed resistor on the driver? Which driver is in the light?
http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1627249#comment-1627249

oweban
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No resistor as I’m not worried about mode changing, and a Biscotti one, 4*7135. Custom mode though (1,2,3,0).

moderator007
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According to this post the current to the tailcap leds is dependent on the number of amc7135’s.
http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1421452#comment-1421452.

I would think adding a bleed resistor would allow the leds to get what ever current the bleed resistor would allow. I seen several post talking about the plastic ring around the metal switch being black and wouldn’t let light through. I’m assuming you have a metal switch that’s made to light up with the clear washer and all.

oweban
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Yep, the rubber around the metal is clear, it lets light through:

And the kit came with a clear washer. Interesting, I would have thought that with no resistor, they’d be brighter given that it’s direct voltage? But an interesting read nonetheless.

oweban
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If I move the tail pcb over to another light with the Convoy 5A CC driver, it does the exact same, so it’s like the actual LEDs are restricted to this amount of brightness inherently.

It’s just really not that bright…

moderator007
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It’s a matter of just how much current the driver will allow from the positive of the battery to run through it and back down the tube to the switch. The current is running in reverse of normal operation. Thats why a bleed resistor is needed in some lights and some need it for the firmware to behave properly.
I know your going to need more current with the metal switch to get light through than a clear rubber boot switch. For my clear boot lighted tailcap switches I usually use 120k resistors at the leds. Its hardly visible in daylight but at night on my bedside table its easily found. If its too bright (resistor value to low) it looks like a night light shinning on the ceiling and the wife complains Facepalm . 120k and above works good for me and last 1 1/2 years or more with the parasitic drain. If you get the parasitic drain to high the battery could be drained in weeks to a few months.

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moderator007 wrote:
If its too bright (resistor value to low) it looks like a night light shinning on the ceiling and the wife complains Facepalm .

Even tritium vials are too much for mine. I don’t know how she sees them through her eyelids Smile
oweban
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I guess my issue is that it isn’t anywhere near bright enough – I’ve removed resistance from the switch board, and it’s on a CC driver. Might find a bunch of replacement LEDs and then swap them out, see what goes brightest (although I thought blue was usually pretty bright).

gchart
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I only tried an S2+ once and took it back out. But I didn’t try too hard, I gave up too early.

Check out this post from ZozzV6: http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1141890#comment-1141890

And now that I do 3D printing, I’m curious about this (in clear, if course). Haven’t tried it yet though. http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1281865#comment-1281865

oweban
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Okay, sounds like I need that PD68 board.

NeutralFan
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Green LEDs are the most efficient by far and will be much more brighter than blue. For my tailcaps, green uses 0.03 milliamps vs blue at 0.21 for the same comparative brightness.

So if you’re having problems seeing light thru the S2+ metal switch, you may want to swap the LEDs to green. Unless you don’t mind lowering the resistance and putting more amps into blue. Any color will eventually work if you lower the resistance enough, but I prefer to get a year or more out of my lighted tailcaps before I need to recharge the battery.

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

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I have a Rev3, I put a 560 ohms resistor, and in my tail cap switch, I changed the resistor to 2.7k ohms, and finally, it works all modes well. The only thing I experienced is when I try to use the 1k ohms has a problem, based on my case, using from 2k ohms above will work fine on the tail cap.

All of the said resistors, I took to my electronic device which is not working at all, ( tv receiver).

Hoping that this experience might give an additional idea to others.

Thank you

Jepoy Espeleta

Dubai, Uae

NeutralFan
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Usually a certain bleeder resistor value is needed for a driver to work and the switch resistors just impact the brightness/current. But strange things can happen with various drivers and firmware.

Did you try a different bleeder resistor when you used the 1K ohms switch resistors? If the brightness is good enough with 2.7K, then no worries.

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

Navyblue13
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Using 1K Ohms is a little bit lighter but noticeable. I did not try yet to changed the value of the bleeder. As of now, i am planning to add 0805 Led and a resistor as well on tail switch, to mix colors. That might be the time to changed the value of the resistor if that will not work.
At first, I only wish to work all fine after this modified, but now I am seeking more to make this project more impressive.

Jepoy Espeleta

Dubai, Uae

NeutralFan
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I finally have a true yellow tailcap that is efficient! It measures 0.15 mA – so with a 30Q battery, it will last over 2 years. I would consider it a bright (canary) yellow.

I combined warm white and green 0805 LEDs:

Here it is compared to my green and warm white tailcaps:

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

pilotdog68
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NeutralFan wrote:
I wanted to have 1 more color for a lighted tailcap. This time I mean it – no more after this! I have all the normal colors (blue, green, white, red, orange) and some other colors (pink, warm white, cool blue). Yellow looks great, but is a bad choice since it’s so inefficient. I’ve tried purple/UV and yellow/green, but also found out they are very inefficient.

So I decided to make my own color. I tried dual colors, like pink on 1 side and green on the other, but I prefer to have just 1 color. I eventually ended up with mixing green and blue to make aqua. Green is the most efficient by far so I wanted to incorporate it, and blue is pretty good too. I actually have 3 different types of blues, so I picked the 1 that created the best color of aqua.

Here’s how I mixed the green and blue. Since green is so efficient, I had to double the resistance (22 Kiloohms + 22 Kiloohms) on the green 0805 SMD LEDs vs the blue. I ended up with 0.15 milliamps at 4.1 volts.

The left picture is the best I can do to show how the aqua looks (middle top) and the right is all of my custom lighted tailcaps (aqua again is middle top).

!{width:49%}https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49737000551_2ccd21cfce_b.jpg!

Just wanted to stop in to say these are really beautiful, man. Glad I could inspire people.

My Favorite Modded Lights: X6R, S8 , X2R , M6, SP03

Major Projects:  Illuminated Tailcap, TripleDown/TripleStack Driver

benjamins
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Can someone please help me to get the tailcaps working right?

I have an orange and a blue one,
and I have 2 Convoy S2s with the same driver

The blue one works on both, but the orange one is messing with modes of both and puts the drivers into the low battery flashing mode when I try switching modes by pressing the switch

I have checked the LED resistors, both are 300ohm

Should I put a lower value resistor for the blue?

[Edit] It shouldn’t be a bleeder resistor problem since the flashlights work with one, right?

djozz
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Since everything affects everything in this way of making a tailcap light, an orange led instead of a blue led could already make a difference,it is a matter of trying to find a configuration that works, and yes the bleeder resistor is the one to try first: if the user interface is messed up, try lowering the bleeder value.

benjamins
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From what I’ve read in this thread people use up to 47k LED resistors, are 300ohm OK ??

There is currently no bleeder – stock 105C drivers
I’ve also read about a person using a 6.9k bleeder for a 7135 based driver, so I think I’ll start there

gchart
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I nearly always use a 750 or 840 Ohm resistor for the bleeder, especially in my 105c’s. Start there, as djozz said.

Tailcap resistors in the realm of 47k are for the ring-style tailcap boards, not for when the LEDs are on the switch’s PCB. Since the ring-style boards are right below the switch cover, they don’t need to be as bright in order to appear brighter.

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Switch convertion kit from Simon for gray and black S2+, this only works for standard 2 led switchboard, ice blue led on this one.

NeutralFan
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Looks nice Ryley. Pretty cool that Simon started offering these. Does the flashlight still tail stand?

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

benjamins
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I spent too much time trying to assemble that together into a metal button S2
Yours was rubber button from factory, wasn’t it?

So I’ve tried playing around a bit and I’ve stuck with a 2.2k bleeder for the blue LED switch,

The orange LED switch seemingly doesn’t care about the bleeder resistor,
(or more accurately the driver is still bothered by the combination)

I’ll try playing with the LED resistors at next opportunity

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