Tear down of the "COSTCO" Feit Electric 810 Lumen 92 CRI LED bulb

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dchomak
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Tear down of the "COSTCO" Feit Electric 810 Lumen 92 CRI LED bulb

Let’s get this part out of the way up front. Regular price at COSTCO for a 3 pack of these bubls is $14.99, but in Connecticut at least, and maybe in other States there is an instant Utility Rebate of $12.00 ended, now back to $4 per pack. Final price is $2.99 $10.99 for the 3 pack or just about a buck a bulb. At that price I can afford to do a tear down. Smile

Here is a 3 pack.

Notable features on the packaging.

Dimmable
Lasts over 22 years (Should have good heat sinking)
810 Lumens, but the wattage is higher than some, 9.5 Watts
Soft White and 2700K
Omni Directional
Shows Colors True and Natural (92 CRI)



First thing to do is “dedome” it. I have done this before with other bulbs without a problem, but this time things were different. Usually I just take a hacksaw and cut around the base of the vinyl globe. This time because it claims an Omni Directional distribution I decided to play it safe and cut a little high incase the pill extends higher into the globe than others. So I cut twice.

That was a mistake, as there is a multitude of LEDs mounted around the perimeter of the star pointing outwards.
I accidentally damaged a few of them.

One of the vertically mounted LEDs that I broke off. These being high CRI, I wonder if anyone knows who makes them.
The 14 LEDs I presume are in series. The boards says it runs at 94V

When I first saw this and noticed that screw I thought that there was a nice aluminum slug under the star!

I love to disassemble stuff for their parts. A slug the same size as the star could be very useful but I don’t think that what that screw is there for. I think it mounts the driver below to the heat sink.
I have further tearing apart to do and will post an update.

Edited by: dchomak on 12/15/2015 - 08:43
bugsy
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That looks like an awesome deal at $1/bulb for high CRI.

WillyD
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Thanks for tearing one apart. Don’t think I would do that myself Smile
I started switching to the Costco bulbs last year. I’ve tried most of them from Lowes and Home Depot, and besides having better prices, I like the light produced from the Costco bulbs the best.

dchomak
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Now that I know how to take this one apart I could do it again in a non destructive way.

L1 and L2, there are 2 inductors a couple of caps, maybe a full wave bridge and some other stuff.

Q1, ME4N60P is a 600V MOSFET

Back side of the driver, the AP1910 is an Universal High Brightness LED Driver Controller
I know that ‘cause I looked it up on Google. Surprisingly there is only a couple of hits for it. Luckily one of them is a PDF file on that part.

I would hate to guess what the sum total of all these parts would be if purchased separately. That’s why I like to sometimes raid functioning electronics for their parts. It can be quite a bargain.

Microa
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The board doesn’t say it run at 94V. 94V-0 is the mark for the flame retardant meets UL94V-0 requirement.

dchomak
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Microa wrote:
The board doesn’t say it run at 94V. 94V-0 is the mark for the flame retardant meets UL94V-0 requirement.

you’re right!

And I thought “V” always stood for volts :bigsmile:

Boaz
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sacra
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Did you ever determine the voltage being supplied to the LED array?

Yesterday I dropped a brand new 16W GE Light Stik (100W equiv) on the concrete floor so I used it as an opportunity to open it up to see what broke. Turns out the impact broke one of the transformer connections. Had the transformer been epoxied to the board, I think the light would have survived the drop.

I was curious about how the LEDs were being driven but I didn’t trust repairing the driver and connecting it to mains so I approached from the other end. The LED module itself consists of 24 3030 LEDs arranged in groups of 6. Not much heat-sinking going on…the LED board appears to be epoxied to a 3mm thick aluminum heat sink of roughly the same diameter. I guess that’s why these bulbs are only rated for 5000 hrs (versus, say, 18000 for the much heavier Utilitech Pro bulbs I use in my outdoor fixtures).

Connected to my bench power supply, the LED module didn’t begin conducting until around 54V. My supply maxes out at around 63V at which point brightness was just beginning to ramp up. At 63V and 20mA, ceiling bounce output was comparable to my Olight S15R’s middle mode so let’s call it 60-70lm. Given where we are on the brightness curve, I’d guess GE’s driver is probably operating somewhere in the 75-80V range.