Battery University...false information?

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Lightgecko
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Battery University...false information?

Came across this link while looking at battery energy densities. Have a look if you have the time. I’m not too sure how reliable they are, but some of the info on the linked page is just plain wrong, or very very outdated.

For example:
“Internal protection circuits typically consume 3% of the stored energy per month.”

Really? I seriously doubt that is true.

I’m not sure if it’s NiCd fanboying or just outdated, but they do make NiCd sound much better than anything else.

Curiosity killed the cat……But I’m not a cat…..

Halo...
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That example looks like just a typo. ////they never used 3% per mo.

Shunra1
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This was the situation about 15 years ago, since then many things have changed.
Lithium and NiMH technologies have advanced while NiCd is now considered obsolete (except maybe, for cheap power tools)

the last time this page was updated was 2010-11-01.

light-wolff
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Lightgecko wrote:
“Internal protection circuits typically consume 3% of the stored energy per month.”
Really? I seriously doubt that is true.

3% of 3000mAh per month would be 90mAh/month, i.e. 0.125mA. A typical single-cell protection circuit consumes only 1/50th of that.
For a large battery pack with active balancing etc. it could however be true.

kiriakos wrote:
Either way, the specific 3% power loss per month this is a sum, including individual battery self-discharge capability plus the small load caused by such electronics.

They write: “Self-discharge / Month (room temperature): 10%” and add the note “Internal protection circuits typically consume 3% of the stored energy per month.”.
That would mean 7% cell self-discharge per month. IMO a Li-Ion cell with such a high discharge rate is defective.
Firelight2
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Shunra1 wrote:
This was the situation about 15 years ago, since then many things have changed.
Lithium and NiMH technologies have advanced while NiCd is now considered obsolete (except maybe, for cheap power tools)

the last time this page was updated was 2010-11-01.

I think this. That’s a very old website and the info is just outdated.