question regarding wireless doorbell

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Buzzing Bulb
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question regarding wireless doorbell

This is a weird one.

I have this wireless doorbell that uses a cr2032 on the button part and plugs into 220v on the ringer end.

For some reason some cr2032’s of the same batch do work and others don’t??

They are all arround 3.2v and 3.3v

It even takes cr2025’s so it is not picky on mAh’s

I rather use cr2032’s because they have like 40mAh’s more.

Any ideas or tricks when it comes to button batteries?

JamesB
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Not a trick on battery per se but they now make wireless doorbell that don’t need batteries, the push button/emitter is self energized via a piezo when a visitor presses the button, i have the Linbell version wich works perfect so far, no more cost, polution and hassle of the batteries, great buy, Yuge.

SawMaster
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Well I was going to suggest bad cells in the batch you bought (a common problem) but since you measured them that ain’t it. The next issue I’ve seen with set-ups like this is the cell holder: are you absolutely certain you’re getting a good connection there? And is anything shorting out the cell?

I install a fair number of these in my work but I’ve never tried alternative cells. I think I’ll have a closer look when I do the next one Wink

Phil

hank
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You may need to measure the voltage under a load and see if some of the cells drop faster than others.

I use a ZTS load tester. Recommended.

gi.lumens
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I second the motion if the doorbell works with a certain set of batteries consistently, and the only variable that changes is the batteries than that is your #1 suspect. Batteries are funny that way, you can read full voltage on a DMM but as soon as they go under load they drop out. There are different ways to test batteries under load but the easist be it that I dont know the configuration of your particular doorbell would be to take a reading at the battery terminals (when it is working ) press the doorbell and find out how low the voltage dropped. Next swap batteries until you create the failure then press doorbell and see what your new reading is. You will see a mojor voltage drop under load. That means you have a bad cell. I hope I articulated my thoughts so you might understand me. My apologies if I didnt make sense. Good Luck

Buzzing Bulb
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A selfpowering doorbell! thanks for the tip JamesB!

Buzzing Bulb
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I’m ordering one now from BG, though I need a US to EU AC adapter.

Most I find have a max of 10A but in the Netherlands our wall plugs deliver 16A.

Can I just use a 10A for a 16A wall output?

RobertB
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Linbell video. American guy lipsinks chinglish.. lol

https://youtu.be/yBSF0MQwgLM

Buzzing Bulb
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Update.

I just got the Linbell and I love it!
It’s way smaller than I thought, also got it with an EU plug that I painted white.
Got it from Banggood within 18 days.