High drain batteries - how do they specify or test them?

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wle
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High drain batteries - how do they specify or test them?
High drain batteries – how do they specify or test them?

Flashlights don’t usually get into the 20 amps out of a single cell category, usually it;s the vapers that use that.
(Which is also why they tend to explode..)
They talk about “sub-ohm” heating elements..

But my question is, are these cells protected?
Some of them are rated 20 and 30 amps from an 18650

How do they rate that?
Is it
A. “battery only permits so much because of internal resistance or protection circuitry”?
B. “it will do this high amp draw at this min voltage..”?

I’m sure there is also specsmanship and different ways to rate, and just outright lying too.

But still, if you needed to sell these batteries, how would you specify that?

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kramer5150
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No replies ?

I’ll go out on a really short, strong and stable limb and speculate that there is no minimum standardization what so ever from the OEM cell manufacturers. Its very likely the more reputable OEMs (panasonic, sanyo, samsung, LG, sony…etc) do have testing requirements but its anyones guess how standardized those are from one to the other.

By the time the product reaches the person heat shrinking their name on the outside there’s absolutely no standardized testing at that level.

Jerommel
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Yeah, sub-Ohm vapers..
Come to think of it, i think my S41S on Sony VTC5 may well draw some 10 Amperes on a fully charged cell…
That’s 10 Amperes at approximately 3.8 Volts (maybe more, i don’t know how much they sag).
R (resistance) = U (voltage) : I (current), so that would be 3.8 : 10 = 0.38 Ohm….
Sub-Ohm flashlight… Big Smile

Angler
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Jerommel wrote:
Yeah, sub-Ohm vapers.. Come to think of it, i think my S41S on Sony VTC5 may well draw some 10 Amperes on a fully charged cell… That’s 10 Amperes at approximately 3.8 Volts (maybe more, i don’t know how much they sag). R (resistance) = U (voltage) : I (current), so that would be 3.8 : 10 = 0.38 Ohm…. Sub-Ohm flashlight… Big Smile

I think if you drip some e-liquid on the led you can get nice vaporization. Crazy

Lexel
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Protection Circuit Bosrds usually go up to 8A for 18650 cells

How much the cell can supply safely is specified by the big cell producers
It depends on chemistry and cell design

For quality high drain cells there is often a maximum continous discharge at 15 or 20A typical for best cell types

Another rating is for short discharge cycles like you have in a vaper it is around 30-35A for best 18650 typical, what the cell can handle safely

For 18650HG2
https://www.nkon.nl/sk/k/hg2.pdf
20A continous discharge
They do a real torture test with up to 95A for 0.5s, but the battery cycle life drops dramatically

Samsung 30Q
https://eu.nkon.nl/sk/k/30q.pdf

On site 16 you can see the mechanical safety test without leakage or electrical failure