Good lubricant for O rings and threads?

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moderator007
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raccoon city wrote:

A stick of butter.  })


Mayonnaise Thumbs Up Big Smile
Nev
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Lady juice Crazy

Zener
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I’ve recently had good luck with Master Plumber Faucet and Valve grease – waterproof, heat resistant, designed to be used with o-rings, valves, washers, etc. $2.99 at True Value Hardware.

I’ve compared it to Syl Glide, white lithium grease, dielectric grease, and others, and it seems less sticky, and more slick. The store rep said it’s silicone based, but you’d have to verify that. I like it. Mag recommended Vaseline. You likely didn’t do any harm, but you’re probably correct to switch to better.

After re-installing the ring, I’ve always used Hoppes 9 gun oil instead of grease on the threads, after cleaning them with alcohol. Things seem to spin together better, especially on Maglites.

Zen

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I use XY-2 silicone grease. One of the cheapest I could find.
Though I’m trying to arrange a shipment of XG-12…

ARsee
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Any silicone based weatherstrip conditioner will work. I been working off an 8oz tube of Silglyde I bought 30+ years ago.

The stuff also works great for re-conditioning door and trunk seals, A little dab goes a long way when spread with a sponge application.

For threaded with o-rings, I use a soft bristle toothbrush

moderator007
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chromoly wrote:
moderator007 wrote:
chromoly wrote:
moderator007 wrote:
RobertB wrote:
The XG-12 Ford Motorcraft Electrical Grease is Nyogel 760G. GM and Chrysler also have it. Can be picked up at your local Ford dealer parts counter.

!{width:100%}https://i.imgur.com/iHyHTJI.jpg!


I was always told it was the best. Guess that’s why Armytek started selling it in smaller tubes.

More than 20 years using WD40, never failed :

!{width:100%}https://www.wd40.com/img/product_family_multi-use.png!


You use it on your O-rings?

Yes. It doesn’t attract dust or dirt like butter, saliva or mayonnaise Wink , WD40 lubricates smoothly both threads and O-rings, for a long time.


The WD is short for Water Displacement. WD40 is not a lubricant. It will clean your O-rings but it will also dry them out if not lubed after cleaning.
ARsee
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I've had the debate of WD-40 with lots of people over the years. That it's a lubricant. Nothing sticks to it because it evaporates.

WD-40 gets used on my fishing lures and baits only.

I get more lubrication rubbing a finger alongside my nose and rubbing it on, then with WD-40.

YMMV

flydiver
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Principal at work: Like dissolves Like.

- Some O-rings are petroleum-based. These are generally black, somewhat firm to fingernail pressure, and not very stretchy.
- Some O-rings are silicone-based. These can be various colored, a bit softer to the fingernail pressure, and a bit more stretchy.
Yeah, there are a whole lot more but for the most part with lights this is what you likely have to deal with.

I know, not very scientific determination, but we are working with cheap lights here where they fabricate performance statistics. Probably most of the time they don’t have a clue what O-ring is bring used and it may change depending on what bulk shipment they got from wherever. I doubt you are ever going to find out.

For threads….metal on metal > use whatever grease or lube you want. Use sparingly, and try not t goop everything up with it.
But, most of the metal threads end in at a O-ring. If you are using the wrong lube, you may end up compromising the O-ring over time.
Not a critical O-ring, not a big deal. You may not even actually need it….so who cares.

I, on the other hand, am a scuba diver. My lights and my cameras are $$$ and those O-ring need to be clean, properly lubed, and taken care of, or I pay the price. Literally.
On petroleum-based O-rings you can use silicone lube.
On silicone-based O-rings you may be able to get away with petroleum lube….but those come in so many different formulations it’s a headache to sort out. I just use a ‘universal lube’ (generally damn expensive; Christo-lube, Tribolube) or one that I KNOW is formulated for silicone, generally less expensive but not terrible (stuff that comes with my camera equipment).
A small amount goes a long way so even an expensive tube is not that big of a deal.

Screw it up or don’t know, some hardware stores have a decent stock of O-rings. Then you know you can use silicone grease.

If it comes out of a spray bottle I wouldn’t trust it.
WD-40 is not a lubricant. It’s a [water displacement] and a poor lube.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

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For older lights without anodized threads in the tailcap, i find that candle wax does the trick best.
Use the softest candle wax you can find, which will stick to the aluminium and smear rather than crumble.
Unlike any other lubricant, it doesn’t dissolve the aluminium, so you don’t get that awful grey gunk you normally get, even with lumpy silicone grease.
True story. Wink

ARsee
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chromoly wrote:
ARsee wrote:

I've had the debate of WD-40 with lots of people over the years. That it's a lubricant. Nothing sticks to it because it evaporates.

WD-40 gets used on my fishing lures and baits only.

I get more lubrication rubbing a finger alongside my nose and rubbing it on, then with WD-40.

YMMV

In your "case" you should stick to the Mayo-Tech-Gel (or the other Margarin-tech-O-Lub'it) Have a good rub ;)

WTH!! Hands on experience, HUH!!

Zener
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flydiver wrote:
I, on the other hand, am a scuba diver. My lights and my cameras are $$$ and those O-ring need to be clean, properly lubed, and taken care of, or I pay the price. Literally.

Thanks. You’re the person to ask this question I’ve had. At some point, do you guys have to just replace the Orings on a time schedule to maintain the waterproof ratings?

I have lights that I’ve kept the rings in good cond. for long periods of time, but I don’t really know if they’re as water resistant as they used to be. Lots of use can fatigue some materials, especially cheapo stuff.

zen

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i tried marine grease on one light and it seems ok so far; will see over time how the o-rings survives
advantage is that it is not water soluble. so will keep water out of the light
desadvantage is that if you get some on fingers, it is difficult to clean…

as for o-ring compatibility with grease types, it will depend on the elastomeric material used, for exemple :

- silicon might not like some greases. silicon is expensive and i would be surprised to find it there, not compatible with oil, but excellent on high and low temps- quick curing too
- acm should be fine – perfect for oil, not good with alcool
- nbr may be ok – cheap , excellent with water and alcool, not good with oil
- epdm may not like -cheapest material – only good with water
others excellent materials like fkm, viton, hnbr would not be used because of cost

some information there

moderator007
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chromoly wrote:
(sigh)

Please, check the manufacturer’s Official website. WD40 displaces water and lubricates.

https://www.wd40.com/products/multi-use

WD-40® helps those who live life hands on protect metal from rust and corrosion, penetrate and free stuck parts, displace moisture, and lubricate just about anything.

(Text from manufacturer’s Official Website)

I have used several many type of lubricant, included bla-bla-gel and other sticky-greasy specialized stuff. I always come back to WD40
It doesn’t attract dust dirt, sand,fabric particles and keep both O rings and thread smooth.

!{width:80%}https://i.imgur.com/o8kmjAC.jpg!


Its a solvent not a lubricant. Clean parts work better than dirty or rusted one’s.
I don’t think anybody even knows whats in this stuff.
bilakos10
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Well, I have been using Petroleum Jelly.
No problems so far with any o-rings, but based on what I have read in this thread I believe it’s a good time to invest in something more o-ring friendly Smile

Nev
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Anyone tried GT185 ?, it’s like wd40 but smells nicer ,does the same job but leaves a very thin Teflon coating behind ,(a dry lubricant ).

moderator007
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chromoly wrote:
moderator007 wrote:
chromoly wrote:
(sigh)

Please, check the manufacturer’s Official website. WD40 displaces water and lubricates.

https://www.wd40.com/products/multi-use

WD-40® helps those who live life hands on protect metal from rust and corrosion, penetrate and free stuck parts, displace moisture, and lubricate just about anything.

(Text from manufacturer’s Official Website)

I have used several many type of lubricant, included bla-bla-gel and other sticky-greasy specialized stuff. I always come back to WD40
It doesn’t attract dust dirt, sand,fabric particles and keep both O rings and thread smooth.

!{width:80%}https://i.imgur.com/o8kmjAC.jpg!


Its a solvent not a lubricant. Clean parts work better than dirty or rusted one’s.
I don’t think anybody even knows whats in this stuff.

You are in denial man Sad What’s wrong with you?

There is a special page for guys like you here:

Slime’s believers

A QUESTION OF LUBRICATION

Myth:

WD-40® Multi-Use Product is not really a lubricant.

Fact:

While the “W-D” in WD-40® stands for Water Displacement, WD-40® Multi-Use Product is a unique, special blend of lubricants. The product’s formulation also contains anti-corrosion agents and ingredients for penetration, water displacement and soil removal.

You are free to believe that a lubricant must absolutely look like some “creamy peanut butter”, or an old granny’s undesirable “juice”,

Take it or leave it Bros:

WD40 dissolves undesirable matter Thumbs Up , then smoothly lubricate it with its own ingredients. Cool


I was wrong.
Somebody did lab test what’s in WD40 here.
mmalive
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Thanks guys for info. Now figuring out which one to use that is cost prohibitive and easy to acquire.

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Well. living in the moist pacific northwest, iffn you decide on the snail/slug option, I can offer volume discounts.

ChrYoko
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my favorite food at xmass !! Silly

flydiver
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That one of those ‘it depends’ questions. I’ve replaced some of the O-rings in Chinese dive lights I get before I took them on a dive. I’ve had other O-rings that I’ve used for years and they seem to be fine.
Generally O-rings are [static=no movement] or [dynamic=movement]. Static can last for years. Their most common problem is permanent deformation if they end up being kind of a “sealing washer/smashed”. That’s not hard to see and those get replaced.
Most of the ones in lights are [static], get compressed to seal, but don’t get smashed. With PROPER lube (non-destructive) those can last for a really long time, IF they are decent material in the first place. Not all O-rings are created equal and some of the ones I’ve gotten on cheap lights are kind of suspicious. But, water-resistant to rain and such is simply not the same as 60 feet of water pressure.

Dynamic O-rings are under constant movement (hydraulics, some parts in dive regulators). Those are subject to pressure and wear. In regulators they are recommended to be replaced annually. But, a LOT of that is liability, and pure fear driven capitalism. I’ve overhauled 20 year old regulators, simply cleaned and lubed what was there, replaced nothing, and bet my life on it by diving it. I absolutely test them for performance and leaks, but more often than not they work fine.

Camera case manufactures recommend annual replacement of their O-rings. But, it is time consuming to send them back, and quite costly. OTOH, a failure of one can immediately destroy $$$$ worth of electronics. But, the harsh reality is it’s usually NOT an O-ring failure, it’s something the operator did wrong. So, I’ve overhauled cases myself, but I’ve never sent one it. I absolutely try to keep the compression off if possible when not being used.

Long way of saying, keep them clean, use the right lube, and they’ll last for years.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

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Permatex Dielectric Grease (made for spark plug boots and battery terminals) has worked for me for years as a budget silicone grease and it’s never caused harm to any of my o-rings, but as stated who knows what they are made of.

I got some Oatey silicone plumbers grease which is supposed to be almost pure but it’s not thick enough for me.

I’ve used Slip 2000 EWG (grease) in a pinch.

BTW, i’ve put different types of o-rings in seperate ziploc bags, saturated each with these lubes and left them for 2+ years (still in there actually), and cant tell a difference between them and the control samples stored in the open at room temp. The only o-rings i have in the bags that i am certain of the type is Viton for what it’s worth. The others…who knows what they’re made of.

Tidbit: The dielectric grease is also good for light bulb sockets, super thin layer on the bulb threads helps prevent seizing Thumbs Up !

Should my information be incorrect in the slightest please inform me as i am always learning as well and may not recollect everything properly. ALSO, ANYTHING I WRITE PLEASE TAKE WITH A THOUSAND GRAINS OF SALT AND YOUR OWN LIABILITY, AS YOU SHOULD WITH ALL INFORMATION.

zerodish
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Get some Dow Corning high vacuum grease. It is made for this type of stuff. I put some in my Zephal HP bicycle pump and it went from 120 psi to more than 160 PSI. I actually cracked a rim testing the limits of the pump. I can’t see there is anything in a flashlight that is not in the pump. That is aluminum and O rings. About $20 for a half ounce tube.

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zerodish wrote:
I can’t see there is anything in a flashlight that is not in the pump.

Electricity Wink
Some lights have bare threads through which the current must flow.

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Dielectric Grease all the way! It waterproofs and insulates electrical connections. It’s safe for the O-rings too.

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On CPF, I had read that Mobil 1 synthetic red grease in the grease gun tube worked well. I bought some for my lights and for repacking bicycle bearings and it’s worked very well. It has a strange smell but once the light is screwed together, it wasn’t noticeable.

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seery wrote:
I’ve been using Nyogel 760G since about 2003.

Same here. It’s kind of pricey but I’ve been using the same tube since about 2007 on numerous lights. A little bit goes a long way. Great stuff.
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Geoduck wrote:
seery wrote:
I’ve been using Nyogel 760G since about 2003.
Same here. It’s kind of pricey but I’ve been using the same tube since about 2007 on numerous lights. A little bit goes a long way. Great stuff.

2012 here and I still have a lot left.

I may even try and repack my SWM V11R with it!

Chris

moderator007
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ChrisGarrett wrote:
Geoduck wrote:
seery wrote:
I’ve been using Nyogel 760G since about 2003.
Same here. It’s kind of pricey but I’ve been using the same tube since about 2007 on numerous lights. A little bit goes a long way. Great stuff.

2012 here and I still have a lot left.

I may even try and repack my SWM V11R with it!

Chris


I think I got mine around the same time, Can’t even hardly tell I have used any. I got a Lifetime Supply I guess.
It probably work in the V11R, might make it less resistive to turn.
klrman
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ARsee wrote:

Any silicone based weatherstrip conditioner will work. I been working off an 8oz tube of Silglyde I bought 30+ years ago.

The stuff also works great for re-conditioning door and trunk seals, A little dab goes a long way when spread with a sponge application.

For threaded with o-rings, I use a soft bristle toothbrush

 

Sil-glyde too.  Always used it on my caliper slider pins and now on my flashlights. 

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I’m amazed no one’s linked CPF’s thread on the matter. It’s very comprehensive.

I use Super Lube on everything.

https://virisenox.wordpress.com/

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