Good lubricant for O rings and threads?

103 posts / 0 new
Last post
klrman
klrman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/07/2016 - 22:44
Posts: 2843
Location: Canada

Virisenox_ wrote:
I'm amazed no one's linked "CPF's thread":http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?126645-Comprehensive-... on the matter. It's very comprehensive. I use Super Lube on everything.

 

There's seems to be many variants of super lube.  Is the one you're talking about link

Virisenox_
Virisenox_'s picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 07/12/2017 - 11:37
Posts: 233
Location: Central Indiana
klrman wrote:

Virisenox_ wrote:
I’m amazed no one’s linked CPF’s thread on the matter. It’s very comprehensive. I use Super Lube on everything.

 


There’s seems to be many variants of super lube.  Is the one you’re talking about link

Yes, that’s the one. US amazon link.

https://virisenox.wordpress.com/

More active on Reddit: /u/Virisenox_


"I go hard."

- Zeroair

"Don't quote me on that."

- Zeroair

klrman
klrman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/07/2016 - 22:44
Posts: 2843
Location: Canada

Thanks, might get a tube never tried it before.

BlancoFire
BlancoFire's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 3 weeks ago
Joined: 04/19/2018 - 16:32
Posts: 71
Location: United States

Nitecore Silicon Lube.

lfowner
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 6 days ago
Joined: 01/18/2013 - 17:32
Posts: 124
Location: Germany

Liteflux Silicone Lube. Enough for the next years… LOL

Borri
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 7 months ago
Joined: 01/10/2018 - 04:02
Posts: 61
Location: The Netherlands

Pricey:

Molykote 55
Molykote 111

Cheap:

Olive-oil

jmm244
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 6 days ago
Joined: 07/23/2012 - 22:39
Posts: 169
Location: US North Coast

The “preferred” Super Lube 21030 Synthetic Grease is also sold at most Harbor Freight stores, so those fortunate (or unfortunate?) enough to live near one can use one of their ubiquitous 20% off coupons for an even better deal (which CAN be combined with a free flashlight coupon = flashaholic Nirvana).

EDCba
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 5 days ago
Joined: 08/25/2018 - 01:10
Posts: 174

So many choices, but there are basically only 2 types:

  1. hydrocarbon based (petroleum)
  2. silicone based

HYDROCARBON
Vaseline/petroleum jelly
Mineral oil
Food oils
Waxes like paraffin and beeswax
Super Lube
Nyogel
Nano Oil

SILICONE
The greases sold by most flashlight brands
Plumbing and scuba greases, I hear

YES, the beloved Nyogel and Nano Oil are petroleum-based. Don’t take my word for it, here’s the MSDS of Nano Oil: http://www.nano-oil.com/Nano-Oil_MSDS_NLNA-5-10-85_20070415_.pdf
- Highly Solvent Refined Paraffinic Petroleum Oil
- Extremely Hydrotreated Heavy Naphthenic Mineral Oil
- Detergent, Inhibitor & Dispersant System Highly refined Mineral base Stock distillates
So those o-rings that work with Nano Oil? I think they’ll be fine with vaseline.

EDCba
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 5 days ago
Joined: 08/25/2018 - 01:10
Posts: 174

But the way I see it, hydrocarbon greases are the safest bet. As flydiver said, both petroleum and silicone o-rings will be resistant to hydrocarbon/petroleum greases.
BUT silicone greases will attack silicone o-rings. We’re just lucky no flashlight manufacturer uses silicone o-rings.

klrman
klrman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/07/2016 - 22:44
Posts: 2843
Location: Canada

Virisenox_ wrote:
klrman wrote:

Virisenox_ wrote:
I'm amazed no one's linked "CPF's thread":http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?126645-Comprehensive-... on the matter. It's very comprehensive. I use Super Lube on everything.

 

There's seems to be many variants of super lube.  Is the one you're talking about link

Yes, that's the one. "US amazon link.":https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XBH9HI/

 

It says dielectric.  Shouldn't make any difference, but if a flashlight had a mechanical lockout and the anodized threads were just a little worn, wouldn't the dielectric grease make it even easier to make electrical contact and disable the mechanical lockout?

luminarium iaculator
luminarium iaculator's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 days 7 hours ago
Joined: 07/07/2013 - 09:09
Posts: 2162
Location: X

Nothing like this:

Use it for anything you can imagine but the best use is for guns and flashlight threads. It stays on threads almost forever in any type of environment.

My recommendation as all in one lube. I use it for years and I used some expensive stuff before that can not match it so I know how it works and I can recommend that to everybody.

power911
power911's picture
Offline
Last seen: 9 hours 4 sec ago
Joined: 05/12/2014 - 02:14
Posts: 927
Location: Malaysia

Nice that I learn as I read this thread. But there’s one lube I’ve been using and it’s lithium grease.

Was told that it is bad for flashlight but can’t remember why. Petroleum based like vaseline maybe? I’m not sure
Maybe I should spend some time googling before I comment.

So far I like it because it is white. If it is grey or black I know its time to clean. (hopefully it’s not eating my light or orings as I used it for 3 years and still looking good)

“Have you forgotten about all those who called you a Bringer of Woe and hunted you like an animal?”
“Normal humans don’t go around killing people and burning towns!”
“Don’t worry. I’ll go with you! So you just follow me and no arguing, okay?”

GRAY LITNIN
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 1 day ago
Joined: 12/05/2017 - 10:22
Posts: 166
Location: WV, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
klrman wrote:
It says dielectric.  Shouldn’t make any difference, but if a flashlight had a mechanical lockout and the anodized threads were just a little worn, wouldn’t the dielectric grease make it even easier to make electrical contact and disable the mechanical lockout?

Should make it easier to lockout. The dielectric grease is an insulator.

When used on an electrical connection the pressure that pushes the contacts together is enough to displace the grease. The remaining grease surrounds the connection and isolates it. This insulates from voltage leaks and helps prevent corrosion by sealing off the air and moisture.

So if your threads are still anodized well, allowing a mechanical lockout, then a grease with dielectric properties will only help.

And if anodizing is worn then it might prevent a connection, but if threads are makin connection before the grease is applied then its probably creating enough pressure to push the grease out of the contact area.

Should my information be incorrect in the slightest please inform me as i am always learning as well and may not recollect everything properly. ALSO, ANYTHING I WRITE PLEASE TAKE WITH A THOUSAND GRAINS OF SALT AND YOUR OWN LIABILITY, AS YOU SHOULD WITH ALL INFORMATION.

SIGShooter
SIGShooter's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 54 min ago
Joined: 07/14/2013 - 02:10
Posts: 2203
Location: northern california

Maybe it’s just my inability to tell good from bad but I’ve never found any differences in one lube from another when used on flashlights or guns, assuming periodic cleaning. I’ve never had an o-ring fall apart or any issues somehow related to lubrication (as far as I can tell) so I’m wondering how people decide that one is better than another?

Grease stays on rails and threads longer than oil of course but that’s seemingly about the only thing I’ve really noticed or care about.

A quart of Mobil 1 is cheap and will last forever when used on flashlights and guns Smile

klrman
klrman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/07/2016 - 22:44
Posts: 2843
Location: Canada

GRAY LITNIN wrote:
klrman wrote:
It says dielectric.  Shouldn't make any difference, but if a flashlight had a mechanical lockout and the anodized threads were just a little worn, wouldn't the dielectric grease make it even easier to make electrical contact and disable the mechanical lockout?
Should make it easier to lockout. The dielectric grease is an insulator. When used on an electrical connection the pressure that pushes the contacts together is enough to displace the grease. The remaining grease surrounds the connection and isolates it. This insulates from voltage leaks and helps prevent corrosion by sealing off the air and moisture. So if your threads are still anodized well, allowing a mechanical lockout, then a grease with dielectric properties will only help. And if anodizing is worn then it might prevent a connection, but if threads are makin connection before the grease is applied then its probably creating enough pressure to push the grease out of the contact area.

 

Good info thanks 

Niko
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 6 days ago
Joined: 02/08/2018 - 09:55
Posts: 166
Location: in der lampe

For 15 years I use this product.
Is very firm and stable, sticky, hard to wash,
Silicone lubes looks like butter, comparing with this Smile

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cfg-blue-boat-grease-125ml-Code-454LUB056/28252...

marine lubes are the best!

ggf31416
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 26 min ago
Joined: 02/25/2016 - 17:38
Posts: 689
Location: Uruguay

Sorry for the necro. I just happen to have WD-40 at hand. Is it harmful for the battery wrappers and protection circuits? I had to use it to remove a protected battery that got stuck in a tight tube and I wonder how good should I clean it up.

RPI
Offline
Last seen: 4 weeks 1 day ago
Joined: 09/14/2017 - 04:36
Posts: 100

I use a lube from mechanical keyboards which I found in a drawer. Krytox.

xxo
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 4 min ago
Joined: 03/22/2019 - 14:35
Posts: 270
ggf31416 wrote:
Sorry for the necro. I just happen to have WD-40 at hand. Is it harmful for the battery wrappers and protection circuits? I had to use it to remove a protected battery that got stuck in a tight tube and I wonder how good should I clean it up.

WD40 is basically mineral oil mixed with parts cleaner. Assuming you wiped it off right away and the labels are still stuck to the cell, I would think that you are OK, though it might be a good idea to let any WD that might have got in the positive vents to drain/dry out by leaving the cell upside down before using.

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1277
Location: Seattle, WA

WD-40 is not mineral oil. It’s a petroleum distillate. It is safe for electrical circuits, if somewhat ‘greasy’.
It is NOT safe for any O-ring that is petroleum based (neoprene/Buna – usually black) as like dissolves like.
I’d not use it on silicone O-rings either. Hard to tell often WHAT Chinese O-rings are made of. If colored, pretty stretchy, and just a bit translucent > probably silicone.
And….its a poor lubricant. It’s a Water Displacement (WD….get it?) product.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

ShyOne
ShyOne's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 43 min ago
Joined: 08/08/2019 - 23:23
Posts: 376
Location: Cortez, FL Cuchara, CO Homeport..AL

SuperLube & call it a day. Wink

jon_slider
jon_slider's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 45 min ago
Joined: 09/08/2015 - 12:20
Posts: 4762
Location: Central North America

wikipedia says:
results of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests on WD-40, showing that the principal components were C9 to C14 alkanes and mineral oil.

ggf31416 wrote:
I just happen to have WD-40 at hand. Is it harmful for the battery wrappers and protection circuits?

I wonder how good should I clean it up.
I would be tempted to use alcohol to clean out the mineral oil residue
CNCman
CNCman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 27 min ago
Joined: 04/07/2018 - 10:10
Posts: 1107
Location: Mississippi Gulf Coast

I have tried Krytox and Dielectric grease. On large diameter lights, it is difficult to move the tail cap or battery tube because it is tight.
The best thing i found is sewing machine oil, applied very lightly or dry, no lube.

cyclops
Offline
Last seen: 17 hours 14 min ago
Joined: 01/17/2013 - 16:33
Posts: 235
Location: USA

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006O5GHW/

I use this for my rc and lights.

max
max's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 37 min ago
Joined: 02/17/2014 - 18:55
Posts: 384
Location: Victoria, TX

WD-40 means it is a Water Displacement formula discovered on the inventors' 40th try. It is not an "oil" as many believe. It is an extremely thin petroleum distillate product and dries out very easily without leaving any worthwhile residue to maintain a good lubricant quality on the parts that were sprayed. If anything it tends to attract dirt/dust, evaporates, and then nothing is left but the dirt. Any real oil, including sewing machine oil, is much better at providing lasting lubrication compared to WD-40. And as mentioned above WD-40 can work to soften or dissolve certain rubber parts like o-rings.

Here's what I use that will not wash off with water, is long lasting, and won't harm your flashlight o-rings:

https://www.amazon.com/Super-Lube-93003-Silicone-Translucent/dp/B07CFS31M8/ref=sr_1_1_mod_primary_new?crid=2BUBBYHUJ3LK5&dchild=1&keywords=super+lube+o-ring+grease&qid=1622692792&sbo=RZvfv%2F%2FHxDF%2BO5021pAnSA%3D%3D&sprefix=super+lube+o-ring%2Ctoys-and-games%2C181&sr=8-1

 

It is not expensive, can be found at hardware stores, automotive parts stores, and online. The 3 oz tube will last a very long time.

 

.

 

 

 

 max

TristanArtSD
TristanArtSD's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 3 weeks ago
Joined: 05/19/2021 - 01:24
Posts: 8
Location: San Diego

I bought a 3oz tube of Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease for spark plug boots years ago (and I expect I’ll be able to pass it down to my theoretical grandchildren someday at the rate I’m using it) and it seems to work quite nicely. It’s silicone based and has worked for me, so far. Also great for my pocket knife (a Kershaw Blur; I use it in the pivot as well as in the recessed spring ‘well’ inside the handle).

Nitecore SRT-6 • Lumintop FW3A • JetBeam RRT-01 Raptor

NeutralFan
NeutralFan's picture
Offline
Last seen: 15 hours 22 min ago
Joined: 03/20/2014 - 19:22
Posts: 1426
Location: Wisconsin, USA
max wrote:

WD-40 means it is a Water Displacement formula discovered on the inventors’ 40th try. It is not an “oil” as many believe. It is an extremely thin petroleum distillate product and dries out very easily without leaving any worthwhile residue to maintain a good lubricant quality on the parts that were sprayed. If anything it tends to attract dirt/dust, evaporates, and then nothing is left but the dirt. Any real oil, including sewing machine oil, is much better at providing lasting lubrication compared to WD-40. And as mentioned above WD-40 can work to soften or dissolve certain rubber parts like o-rings.


Here’s what I use that will not wash off with water, is long lasting, and won’t harm your flashlight o-rings:


https://www.amazon.com/Super-Lube-93003-Silicone-Translucent/dp/B07CFS31M8/ref=sr_1_1_mod_primary_new?crid=2BUBBYHUJ3LK5&dchild=1&keywords=super+lube+o-ring+grease&qid=1622692792&sbo=RZvfv%2F%2FHxDF%2BO5021pAnSA%3D%3D&sprefix=super+lube+o-ring%2Ctoys-and-games%2C181&sr=8-1

It is not expensive, can be found at hardware stores, automotive parts stores, and online. The 3 oz tube will last a very long time.

Unfortunately, Super Lube 93003 Silicone O-Ring grease is not compatible with silicone rubber according to their website (Super Lube Silicone O-Ring Grease ), which is used in a lot of flashlight O-rings.

Instead, I would recommend Super Lube® Multi-Purpose Synthetic Grease which is compatible with silicone rubber O-rings.

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

zoulas
zoulas's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 39 min ago
Joined: 06/01/2020 - 08:35
Posts: 1669

We lubricate o rings so they last longer. What would you do if you found out that o rings would last longer of you did not lubricate them?

Binford
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 3 days ago
Joined: 07/31/2019 - 16:07
Posts: 123

I use synthetic grease for o-rings.

Dalamar
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 1 hour ago
Joined: 04/25/2019 - 21:13
Posts: 232

zoulas wrote:
We lubricate o rings so they last longer. What would you do if you found out that o rings would last longer of you did not lubricate them?

Too much is worse than too little.

tbh, I think grease is way too thick for a flashlights threads given that test show too much is worse than none, you are 100% guaranteed to get too much, and cleaning off the excess is nearly impossible, i sadly followed some advice in here….. do not buy the super lube grease. if you do, take the orings off and make sure it’s not globbed on.

Hornady one shot is guaranteed to go on thin but it’s a waste to use it on flashlights, just use a thinner lube and try to dry it off, the remnant is enough

I only like high CRI. Collection:

Fireflies NOV-MU 21 4500k E21A

Fireflies ROT66 219B SW45 D220

Fireflies E07 Copper 219B SW45k? (odd/higher lumen bin with lower r9 and higher cct?)

Fireflies E07 219B SW45k

Fireflies E07x Pro sst20 FA4 4000k (mail)

 

Varmint removal:

Convoy M21A C8 ver SST20 4000k (5a)

Convoy S2+ SST20 4000k  FB4 (3200ma)

Memes:

BLF GT94

Emisar D18 660nm SST20 (mail)

 

 

CRI test dump https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1kcl_uOhgfpR4RSsa8F4b-UUVP9mkL6Cr...

Pages