Latest and greatest dive lights?

56 posts / 0 new
Last post
d_t_a
Offline
Last seen: 21 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/04/2017 - 23:58
Posts: 2618
Location: Manila, Philippines
RobertB wrote:
klrman wrote:

RobertB wrote:
Sofirn SD01 is the same light as the Thorfire S1 what ever dive light you get, just make sure you get some good silicone grease, to apply to the o-rings frequently

 


I ordered the SD02 and have a tube of Sil-Glyde ready.  The side button on the SD02 I’m not sure how to make  water proof other than hope Sofirn did a decent job with it.

Shouldn’t have to lube the side button. It should be a magnetic button or something

Hmm. Thorfire S1 and Sofirn SD01, I suppose shouldn’t be too much surprised as I notice many Thorfire flashlights have look-alike (or exactly the same) models as the Sofirn ones, since it’s said that Sofirn is the OEM manufacturer for Thorfire…

The Sofirn SD02/SD02A looks like a push-button switch, probably not magnetic, I was wondering if it will really be waterproof too…

djozz
djozz's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 2 min ago
Joined: 09/07/2012 - 17:04
Posts: 18083
Location: Amsterdam
MascaratumB wrote:
98dinan3 wrote:
ZozzV6 wrote:
The Brinyte DIV15S is currently on a big sale on gearbest. It is 20.58$ App only. I didn’t tried it or know it before but it seems to be pretty good.

that light comes up at $120 cdn for me…

Anyway, I think I’ve got it narrowed down to the… Sofirn Sd-01, sd-02, sd-03…
Thorfire TD26
xtar whale (I like the Walrus but not looking to drop $500 for 2 of them.)

Have I missed anything super duper or am I making a mistake with any of these?

BTW… I need 2 of each for whatever gets decided.

On the APP it is below 19€ form like 86% OFF Wink


Has anyone actually bought it for below 20 dollar? I tried, and got 119 dollar on the app
flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

Niko wrote:
Dive gear express NOT dive rite express Wink

Dive rite are scuba professionas

dgx 600 is same as brynte light and many other brand have same model.

Yes. Corrected. Thanks for jogging my memory about Brynte light being DGX. You can get the Brynte for half or less.

Note – Have a friend with a Dive Rite canister light ($$$) that was getting a short run time. I checked it out for him. Nice light. Battery was seriously unbalanced with 1 bad cell. I’ve seen a few PCB protection go bad and not do their job which screws up the whole pack. They wanted a small fortune for a simple 5S 18650 flat pack containing Tenergy cells. Bought a Tenergy pack for 1/3 the price, swapped connectors, and it’s doing fine 2 years later. I’ve found some of the high end canisters have great lights, and skimp on the cells and charger.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

klrman
klrman's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 1 day ago
Joined: 11/07/2016 - 22:44
Posts: 2844
Location: Canada

RobertB wrote:
klrman wrote:

RobertB wrote:
"Sofirn SD01":https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Sofirn-SD01-Scuba-Diving-Flashl... is the same light as the "Thorfire S1":https://i.imgur.com/DAfnuPj.jpg what ever dive light you get, just make sure you get some good silicone grease, to apply to the o-rings frequently

 

I ordered the SD02 and have a tube of Sil-Glyde ready.  The side button on the SD02 I'm not sure how to make  water proof other than hope Sofirn did a decent job with it.

Shouldn't have to lube the side button. It should be a magnetic button or something

 

I can't tell what type of button it is but it doesn't look magnetic from the pics.  Maybe I'm wrong.  I'll know when it arrives next week.

Lightbringer
Lightbringer's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/30/2016 - 14:12
Posts: 15878
Location: nyc
flydiver wrote:
The Boruit looks like the same light I mention in my first post as the U’King. It’s pretty much the same design as the DV-S9. Possibly a decent light. Mine worked fine, but I haven’t tested it extensively.

I can’t comment on the other two, just the DV-S9. It’s sealed hella well with triple O-rings in the tailcap, everything else is Just One Big Tube (ie, no head+tube), and the only other possible point of ingress is at the front lens and bezel. Looks to be well-sealed as I haven’t yet gotten the bezel to loosen, but probably only a single O-ring between bezel and lens might be a weakness under pressure.

If I were doing some serious diving, I’d a) check the thickness of the glass vs water pressure to make sure I don’t go down too deep, and b) if taking it apart, use RTV or something to really seal the lens against the bezel, and then only worry about the bezel-to-body interface. (And let it outgas quite a while so it doesn’t fog the lens/reflector.)

I use YEZL lube-goo on my lights’ threads, as it feels stiff and waxy at first, but smears pretty well, like thick Vaseline™. Over several threads’ worth, it should provide a good seal.

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

The lube is so the O-rings don’t distort with screwing the back on. Lube provides no sealing power for real diving. Putting it on bare AL threads certainly helps with friction and helps minimize corrosion. Theoretically the O-ring should prevent water from getting there.

On any of these lights that front seal is always a question. For the most part you dive it and hope. Opening it up probably increases the possibility of failure unless you know what you are doing. I’ve done it, but it’s kind of scary.
On a glass surface that small there would have to be pressure beyond recreational limits to be an issue unless the glass was really thin. Can’t say I’ve even bothered to worry about that issue. If it was a problem the manufacturers would learn about that pretty quickly.

An issue I found is the metal ring that keeps the switch slider from falling out. It’s AL to AL threads with thin anodizing. Take that in saltwater and they WILL corrode together. Best to take it off when new and use thick silicone grease liberally on the threads. ANYWHERE there are screws/threads/metal-metal contact in saltwater needs to be addressed, generally BEFORE you ever dive it.

The screws, bolts, and connectors on my camera tray get awful after 6 months, and I always rinse the hell out of them. Pressure and capillary action drives saltwater into microscopic thread areas and simple soaking just doesn’t get it out. If you don’t address it regularly (disassemble, clean, assemble with thick silicone grease) they fuse together, then they corrode until they fall apart. That’s an expensive problem.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

Lightbringer
Lightbringer's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/30/2016 - 14:12
Posts: 15878
Location: nyc

flydiver wrote:
The lube is so the O-rings don’t distort with screwing the back on. Lube provides no sealing power for real diving. Putting it on bare AL threads certainly helps with friction and helps minimize corrosion. Theoretically the O-ring should prevent water from getting there.

Hmm, what about grease-packed bearings like for small (remote) subs and the like? Thought the grease, “wetted” to the shaft and housing, is supposed to block water under at least modest pressures.

flydiver wrote:
On any of these lights that front seal is always a question. For the most part you dive it and hope. Opening it up probably increases the possibility of failure unless you know what you are doing. I’ve done it, but it’s kind of scary.

Unless it’s a crappy seal to begin with. Big Smile

flydiver wrote:
On a glass surface that small there would have to be pressure beyond recreational limits to be an issue unless the glass was really thin. Can’t say I’ve even bothered to worry about that issue. If it was a problem the manufacturers would learn about that pretty quickly.

Pressure + an accidental tap might just stress it beyond its working limits.

flydiver wrote:
An issue I found is the metal ring that keeps the switch slider from falling out. It’s AL to AL threads with thin anodizing. Take that in saltwater and they WILL corrode together. Best to take it off when new and use thick silicone grease liberally on the threads. ANYWHERE there are screws/threads/metal-metal contact in saltwater needs to be addressed, generally BEFORE you ever dive it.

That’s what I don’t quite understand. If they’re the same metals (ie, not acting as a battery w/ saltwater electrolyte), and have 0V potential across them, what makes them corrode?

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

There are ‘dynamic’ (movement) and ‘static’ (no movement) seals. Technically you need nothing on static seals but a small amount of lube is generally used for assembly. On dynamic seals you absolutely need lube. In a regulator at full tank pressure a few of the O-rings are subject to 3500psi air pressure, and absolutely no air is allowed to leak. On piston type regulators the main O-ring is dynamic so there is movement, not a lot, but there is. High durometer (hard), O-rings of special compounds and really good grease are required.

http://www.applerubber.com/hot-topics-for-engineers/how-an-o-ring-works/
There’s huge amounts of very technical info if you care to dig deeper.

Pressure + accidental tap > happens with some frequency when poking around in corals and rocks. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of a lens breaking. OTOH, most of my dive buddies are using true dive lights.

Saltwater + a chunk of most any metal all by itself > corrosion. When you dive EVERYTHING gets rinsed, or you pay the price. Titanium and gold seem immune. Even chrome and brass corrode after awhile.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

MascaratumB
MascaratumB's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 hours 28 min ago
Joined: 10/29/2016 - 12:12
Posts: 6929
Location: Portugal
djozz wrote:
MascaratumB wrote:
98dinan3 wrote:
ZozzV6 wrote:
The Brinyte DIV15S is currently on a big sale on gearbest. It is 20.58$ App only. I didn’t tried it or know it before but it seems to be pretty good.

that light comes up at $120 cdn for me…

Anyway, I think I’ve got it narrowed down to the… Sofirn Sd-01, sd-02, sd-03…
Thorfire TD26
xtar whale (I like the Walrus but not looking to drop $500 for 2 of them.)

Have I missed anything super duper or am I making a mistake with any of these?

BTW… I need 2 of each for whatever gets decided.

On the APP it is below 19€ form like 86% OFF Wink


Has anyone actually bought it for below 20 dollar? I tried, and got 119 dollar on the app

Price has changed on my app now, it is 105.47€ !
But it was that price stated above with 82% off in the flash sale!

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

This looks very interesting: ARCHON D15VP 1300LM Two-in-One Professional Diving Video&Spot LED Flashlight 100M
On sale right now with code [97f7d3], $10 off.

I don’t have personal experience with this light, but Archon is one of the reliable dive light makers. I know several people that have other models that work well. I’m tempted but have so many other dive lights it’s hard to make a case for yet one more.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

Alen
Offline
Last seen: 3 days 21 hours ago
Joined: 04/03/2012 - 08:26
Posts: 444
Location: Italy

what you think of the double head MDL-029 at fasttech?
looks versatile and Price is low, but don’t know if water will enter.

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA
Alen wrote:
what you think of the double head MDL-029 at fasttech? looks versatile and Price is low, but don’t know if water will enter.

Suitable for ‘wet’ applications. Would not take it diving.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

Alen
Offline
Last seen: 3 days 21 hours ago
Joined: 04/03/2012 - 08:26
Posts: 444
Location: Italy
flydiver wrote:
Alen wrote:
what you think of the double head MDL-029 at fasttech? looks versatile and Price is low, but don’t know if water will enter.

Suitable for ‘wet’ applications. Would not take it diving.

Where did you read it?
Description and photos say ‘‘Diving IPX8 60M’‘

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

I see only this on your link:
[For a variety of outdoor activities such as:sport fishing,night riding,camping,emergency rescue,mountaineering,caving,etc.] Diving is not listed. I’d think if it was, it would clearly say so.
[Waterproof IPX8 ]

IP = International Protection rating
X = Dust ingress not specified/tested.
8 = Can be immersed beyond 1M.

That’s all. The actual depth and time it can remain underwater as well as how much dynamic pressure it can withstand are entirely up to the manufacturer, the details of which they are supposed to divulge in the product specifications. No details means the IPX8 rating is invalid.

Hey, it’s $21. Go for it, report back….. Evil

You want a dive light, get a DIVE light. Smile

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

Alen
Offline
Last seen: 3 days 21 hours ago
Joined: 04/03/2012 - 08:26
Posts: 444
Location: Italy

ok thanks Wink

flydiver
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 6 min ago
Joined: 06/19/2013 - 19:16
Posts: 1308
Location: Seattle, WA

Follow up on SEA-CK TS100 L2 U2 1000Lumens 4Modes Waterproof Diving LED Flashlight 50M

Took 2 on a tropical trip. One survived 31 dives, the other about 25. It ended up with a cracked lens and flooded. The area we were in had current occasionally and the bottom was frequently a mix of sand and rubble. I’m pretty sure the light that died got jammed into the bottom with some force and hit a rock. I don’t consider this a problem with the light, more a problem with the diver. Facepalm

The flooded light was disassembled. It had multiple dives and reasonable rinsing. There is a semi-clear O-ring under the lens which is held in place by a screwed in blue aluminum ring. It wasn’t too bad to get out, not corroded in place after this level of use. FWIW, the battery got a bit wet, some electrolysis on the top, but seemed to have survived the experience with a bit of cleanup and new shrink wrap.

The switch surprisingly was fine, one of my original areas of concern. I expected there to be a fair amount of rust on the magnet and spring like I’ve seen in other cheap dive lights, but they were completely clean. I HAD proactively silicone greased everything, including the screws, before diving it but in this case I don’t think that made a huge difference except maybe in the screws. There was a tad of rusting on them. I find pretty much everything metal has issues with saltwater over time.

It’s a decent light. Often less than $20 on sale, easy to carry, adequate light in tropical situations. I find it a bit dim for day dives in murky NW cold water. Modes are pleasantly easy to work with and the switch seems solid. On medium it’s good for at least 2 dives, only 1 on high.
Mine came with some brown silicone O-rings. Tried silicone dive grease on one of them and they swelled up and wouldn’t fit after awhile. Replaced with neoprene and that worked fine. Only used grease specified for silicone O-rings on the other light and those O-rings are still going fine.

Flooded light replaced with DV-S9 which worked out well. It’s just a bit larger to carry. OTOH a 26650 would last a lot longer if you used one. The spot is a tad more focused on the DV-S9.

To Air is Human, to Respire….Divine.

Mieciu
Offline
Last seen: 7 months 4 days ago
Joined: 02/07/2015 - 14:26
Posts: 40
Location: Poland

Two Nitesun flashlights in cold dark water :

Lightbringer
Lightbringer's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/30/2016 - 14:12
Posts: 15878
Location: nyc
Mieciu wrote:
Two Nitesun flashlights in cold dark water :

Whoa…

If I saw a huge bull-like thing underwater, I think I’d want to get up to the surface right quick.

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

RobertB
RobertB's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 12/18/2015 - 17:49
Posts: 3742
Location: USA, Michigan
Lightbringer wrote:
Mieciu wrote:
Two Nitesun flashlights in cold dark water :

Whoa…

If I saw a huge bull-like thing underwater, I think I’d want to get up to the surface right quick.

I’d attach a buoy on that buffalo, go get a boat, and drag that back to the surface. Nice front lawn ornament.

Those are some nice videos. Nice to see dive light makers actually send them to diver’s to review

hank
hank's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 days 6 hours ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:52
Posts: 9599
Location: Berkeley, California

Current discussion of the SD03: http://budgetlightforum.com/node/68274

Lightbringer
Lightbringer's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/30/2016 - 14:12
Posts: 15878
Location: nyc

Or a big honkin’ 2×26650 dive-light!

Kind of an underwater L6. LOL

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

d_t_a
Offline
Last seen: 21 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/04/2017 - 23:58
Posts: 2618
Location: Manila, Philippines

I’d like to revisit this “diving lights” message thread.

Usually when someone asks me for “diving” flashlights, I immediately point them to the Sofirn ‘diving’ series flashlights (DF10, SD02A, SD05, WK20, WK20S, DL40, etc)

However, some are concerned that these (comparatively) low-cost diving flashlights may easily corrode when used in salty/sea-water environments. Usually reviews of these diving flashlights test their beam, brightness, water-resist/water-proof (in shallow fresh water), but it’s hard to find anyone who has actually used them in deeper diving, and reporting about how any of the Sofirn “diving” flashlights (or other similar-priced diving flashlights) fare when used with salt/sea-water.

Would anyone know how long before the anodizing of the diving light starts to corrode? (As I understand, corroding will surely happen when used in saltwater, but how quickly would be the question).. Any comments or experiences?

CLB
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 3 weeks ago
Joined: 03/09/2019 - 17:38
Posts: 60
Location: California

Hello, d_t_a. Anodizing, per se, does not corrode, but of course the aluminum underneath will corrode anywhere the anodizing is worn or scratched. I have several of the Sofirn-built lights you mentioned, which do not have the highest quality anodizing, and have used them repeatedly in saltwater. I also rinse them in fresh water after use, and there is no corrosion of the aluminum after a year or so, except where there are scratches. For reference, I have seen hard-anodized sailboat masts that show no signs of corrosion after twenty years, except around fastener holes or areas of wear. For that matter, I have seen twenty-year-old non-anodized masts that are structurally just fine. In the presence of oxygen, bare aluminum quickly forms a layer of aluminum oxide which acts a protection against further corrosion. There is lots of info on the web about this. For example: https://www.quora.com/Will-aluminum-corrode-easily-if-submerged-entirely... .

Perhaps of more concern than the degradation of the aluminum material itself is the freezing up of buttons, bearings, and/or rotary rings due to corrosion. This is the main reason I carefully rinse and lube my dive lights.

d_t_a
Offline
Last seen: 21 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 08/04/2017 - 23:58
Posts: 2618
Location: Manila, Philippines

CLB wrote:
Hello, d_t_a. Anodizing, per se, does not corrode, but of course the aluminum underneath will corrode anywhere the anodizing is worn or scratched. I have several of the Sofirn-built lights you mentioned, which do not have the highest quality anodizing, and have used them repeatedly in saltwater. I also rinse them in fresh water after use, and there is no corrosion of the aluminum after a year or so, except where there are scratches. For reference, I have seen hard-anodized sailboat masts that show no signs of corrosion after twenty years, except around fastener holes or areas of wear. For that matter, I have seen twenty-year-old non-anodized masts that are structurally just fine. In the presence of oxygen, bare aluminum quickly forms a layer of aluminum oxide which acts a protection against further corrosion. There is lots of info on the web about this. For example: https://www.quora.com/Will-aluminum-corrode-easily-if-submerged-entirely... .

Perhaps of more concern than the degradation of the aluminum material itself is the freezing up of buttons, bearings, and/or rotary rings due to corrosion. This is the main reason I carefully rinse and lube my dive lights.

Thanks for sharing your experience and the effects of corrosion on aluminum! I’ve underlines your quote which I can relay to others if they ask me regarding corrosion of the Sofirn diving lights.

Coulomb.
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 11/14/2021 - 09:13
Posts: 4
Location: USA

I dive often in all kinds of conditions. I bring two lights with me on every dive.

For a while I was using the DGX600 and DGX800 lights and had a bunch of them. Had one flood (fill with water due to seal failure) on the first dive and it was replaced under warranty. One other one stopped working for no apparent reason, and a third one flooded because I loaned it to someone who twisted it apart underwater and flooded it because they were trying to turn it on and weren’t sure which way to turn.

I have recently switched to the Princeton Tec Torrid. It’s an 8xAA light, 500 lumens. It has a side switch so if I loan it out it won’t end up twisted apart and flooded. I also have a Princeton Tec Impact, a 4xAA light with the same twist switch that the DGX600 uses, that I will be keepin g as a backup light. These are somewhat more bulky than 18650 lights but I like Eneloops because I believe it is safer to handle the cells with less of a risk of fire if the cells are dropped on a boat or something.

There are three use cases for dive lights:
1. Daytime use on typical dives in lakes and oceans where daylight is visible
2. Night dives in lakes and oceans, and deeper dives in poor visibility waters where there is no daylight
3. Cave and wreck dives

On daytime dives typically the daylight colors are distorted with reds being absorbed by water with the algae present in freshwater absorbing much of the blue-green spectrum also. A major use of a dive light on these dives is to improve color rendition. Even a low-CRI light with a high color temperature will restore color perception to a considerable degree. Also on daytime dives the lights are used for looking into shaded areas, under ledges and behind rocks and so on.

On night dives the environment is surreal. A higher CRI light would be a luxury but perhaps not important. Typically on these dives the light will be on for the duration of the dive. A typical dive is 45 minutes with more experienced divers (who use less air as they become more comfortable under water) being able to dive for as long as 75 minutes with the equipment most commonly used. So the runtime on the light has to be somewhat more than 75 minutes and beyond that doesn’t matter much.

I don’t dive caves or wrecks. This is where canister lights were traditionally used to achieve longer runtimes and higher intensities during the halogen and HID era. Some still use canister LED lights although there has been a move to handheld lights. The runtime on some of these dives is considerable with rebreather divers able to stay down for many hours.

Anyway I set up my kit the same way for day and night dives, with a primary light and backup light. The lights must have provisions for a lanyard at the tailcap since that is how they attach to my rig, they have to be operable with thick gloves on, and have to be good for 75 minutes. I don’t usually dive past 100’ deep (30m) and never past 130’ (40m). Those are fairly typical maximum depths for most people, there’s a technical diving community out there that goes past that but rarely much deeper than about 200’ and hardly ever past 300’.

Pages