A thread about Mental Illness

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raccoon city
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A thread about Mental Illness

Let's see if we can have a grown-up discussion about mental illness.

I know there is a stigma associated with mental illness with many people, but that may change if there are more conversations about it.

...

Mental illness runs in my family, and just about everyone in my immediate family takes medication for mental illness.

I take meds for depression and anxiety, and they work great for me.

As far as I can tell, most people that are mentally ill do better when they work with their doctor/s and that usually involves taking medication, and many times engaging in therapy.

My father passed away when he was not taking his meds, and I believe he would be alive today if he could have stayed on meds that work for him.

 

So if you have a story about mental illness, I'd like to hear it.  :THUMBS-UP:

 

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Edited by: raccoon city on 02/14/2019 - 01:39
toddcshoe
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I don’t have any immediate family that I am aware of that has any type of mental illness. Though I wonder about my sister. She has been married 6 times, joined and quit 7 different cult like religions and is actively seeking to become a sister wife. Whatever that is.

I did have a close friend of mine that may have suffered from mental illness. Nobody was aware of it until he put a bullet in his head and the note that was left behind. I won’t quote it word for word but I will give you the cliff notes on it. He was an older gentleman, 78 to be exact. What nobody knew was, he was gay. I knew the man 30 years and I didn’t know. His family didn’t know. Nobody knew. The day and age that he grew up in, it wasn’t as accepted as it is now days. Back then it was something to be ashamed of and never ever talked about. So he kept it in. All those years, he never had someone close enough to him that he felt comfortable enough with to talk about it. I am positive that the family that he had still living and all of the other friends of his that I knew, would have been more than happy to listen without judgment.

So I am sure that this may have had to have some kind of mental effect on him over the course of his life. Nobody will ever know but, I am sure that wasn’t a easy thing to do on a daily basis. Ya know, put on that happy face and live life with a secret you think nobody would accept and leave this world not knowing that everybody would. It’s sad. It was great to call him my friend when he was alive and it’s a honor to remember him everyday.

"Everywhere I go, there I am"

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One point I want to make is that it is very easy to believe that the state you find yourself in is a natural result of your circumstances.

You can be seriously depressed, to the point of paranoia, while not recognising that it is a mental state. You actually believe that everything is against you, and that there is nothing positive to live for. People telling you to snap out of it have no idea, anyone saying that is a clueless idiot on the topic of mental health.

You can be naturally sad because of circumstances, but mental health is an issue when you can be sad regardless of circumstances, and are often unable to even see that your state has transcended circumstances. basically your perspective is warped, and you are to some extent unaware of that.

Personally, I remember multiple times when I was in trouble, and unaware at the time that my view of the world was badly warped.
At my worst, circumstances were completely irrelevant to me, I lived my life like a robot, until it got to the point I couldn’t even eat because food seemed irrelevant and hunger was just another thing working against me that I didn’t care enough to address.

Looking back now it’s hard to believe that I never ended up seeking help, I have never been diagnosed with anything or been on medication.
I have never been around people aware enough to intervene correctly.

Beam me up!

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Zulumoose wrote:
I have never been around people aware enough to intervene correctly.

That’s the biggest problem, IMHO.

Generally when you’re in a healthy relationship or attentive family, slipping into mental illness is caught before it starts getting a foothold. When you’re living on your own, it’s VERY easy to slip into a mental state of depression, anxiety, withdrawal, etc. Or, if you live in a family that is ignorant or insensitive to your situation… can be just as lonely.

My parents divorced when I was 10 and it affected me significantly. I lashed out in various ways, as much as I would as a generally timid young boy. I didn’t become brash, disruptive, indulgent in dangerous things, etc. I just gradually withdrew, despite my mother dragging me to this class and that activity. The stepfather that “replaced” my father was too interactive. Neural scrutinizer. Examine everything, every though fiber in your mind. “What made you do that, exactly? We’re going to find out.” No, you’re not. My thoughts are my own and you’re never going to have them.

When parents inadvertently tie off your balls so you don’t feel confident.
When parents downplay what you’re feeling and claim to know what’s best.
When parents hear your voice but don’t accept your content.

I’m not a dad and probably never will be. I would be too OCD about raising a perfectly well balanced child into young adulthood. And they’d probably find a way to foil my good intentions anyway. Parenting is tough enough as it is when you’re in comfortable middle class. I can’t even imagine what it must be like for so many kids these days who are coming from broken homes, OCD parents, or out-of-touch super-busy parents… USA social programs are non-existent to help parents be the best they can be. Complete 180 degrees and you’re in Sweden or Denmark, where the help is overwhelmingly good.

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as a police officer i have dealt with many people in crisis.

i believe that most folks dont realize that they are dealing with something that is out of their control and most times there are medical solutions.
i believe we miss these indicators in ourselves and dismiss them to just feeling bad or being in a bad place mentally.
sometimes we feel like we just need to tough it out.

i have found that family and friends are most likely to see the signs before we see them in ourselves.

i think that being a friend/family member means talking about these issues and helping/encouraging those we love to seek professional help.

please dont suffer in silence.

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my mental ….. started when i saw my parents fighting…regular..and they blamed ME for that—7 years old…crap.then i “tasted” marihuana and Jin was out of the bottle…never again.
now iam a social worker and mental illness client are my “customers”..poor children…

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I’ve seen a hospital from the inside due to depression and panic disorder.
That was the hardest period of my life…but also the most efficient period of learning. Learning about myself. And it made me a much better person.
It is not something I would recommend to anyone but at the same time I don’t view it negatively.

Medication?
I needed it before the hospital. I needed it initially while there but I stopped taking it before I went out. Haven’t needed it since though I needed counselling for another 8 years or so.

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Úf. What a Hard story.. So you are out of it.?

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raccoon city
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So I said a little about my dad.

Mental illness hit him harder than anyone else in my family.

He actually attempted suicide, and his death, although probably an accident, was premature.

...

I've been mentally ill since middle school, and I was diagnosed when I was 19 years old.

I've been on meds ever since, and they help me immensely.

I've done a little of therapy, but I'm pretty stable just taking my meds.

For anyone that has been on medication, and maybe it didn't help, I say keep trying other medications until you find something that works for you.

Luckily since most of my family takes meds, there's no stigma in my family.

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My girlfriend has mental illness. She takes medication , and mostly is fine . There are times though , when something triggers her emotions. As Zulumoose said , perspective gets warped . She will believe situations schewed from reality . I can generally perceive changes that she doesn’t realize are happening . Fortunately, having been together 10 years now , she trusts me to let her know this and can adjust her meds accordingly .

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Didnt know we háve People with stories like this here… Well, we need more and more light for US..

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vresto wrote:
Úf. What a Hard story.. So you are out of it.?

Pretty much yes though it can never be certain.
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I admire you guys for talking about something so personal.This is as personal as it gets for me on these forums!,,,Probably too personal!

I will say this. I think I have mentioned this once or twice on this forum. I have been sober almost 22 years. Put a drink in my and I can be insane! Went to jail several times and prison once,was misdiagnosed as bi polar.Having an addiction and being misdiagnosed is Not uncommon because of the insane behavior, depression ect. associated with the disease of addiction.

I could tell at least a dozen or so stories of insanity but they do not need to be mentioned……..I think I am relatively sane without alcohol.,,that is debatable!

My X girlfriend Barbara and I are still friends. She is the youngest of Seven. Two siblings committed suicide, Three siblings[including her] are on depressive medications, leaving Two[Out of Seven] that do not have a mental illness.

The Father died when Barbara was Two. He was a violent manic depressive alcoholic. He not only passed down the genes[of mental illness] to most of his kids, he also affected everyone in a negative and damaging way. The older siblings remember him and were actually relieved when he died[age Fifty-Two].

,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Sad Very sad.

It is NOT uncommon for people with mental illness to self Medicate. So a lot of addicts can also have other mental illnesses[Dual Diagnosis] while others do not and can be misdiagnosed.

Solitude breeds contemplation which creates clarity. 

Environment molds a person. Perseverance changes them. 

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The first diagnosis is to determine what is normal for the person who is determined to be mentally ill.
If it is destructive behavior; the next step is to determine what caused the behavior.
The movie Good Will Hunting is a good example. Another one is The Punisher.
“Normally” It’s not your fault.
We all have crazy thoughts; we don’t all act on them.
Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality. Hat although a good writer can portray truth using fantasy.(Walt Disney).
I can be someone I’m not on a forum. Innocent
Non-conformity is not mental illness.
Perception is reality.

"The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.” ~ U.S. Senator William H. Borah (1865-1940) affectionately known as the "Lion of Idaho"

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lampliter wrote:
Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality. Hat although a good writer can portray truth using fantasy.(Walt Disney).

First I will say there are many types of mental illness. Perhaps the ONLY flavor of that “May” apply to your opinion, would be Schizophrenia.

I would disagree with that As a “Totally” inclusive statement, which is the way you wrote it.

I imagine your OPINION would not sit well with someone on here who has admitted to being mentally ill. I can not speak for them.

Although, I find it insulting.

I can speak for my Friend Barbara and Bill,,,your opinion which is FAR from Diagnosis[Are you a Doctor,,,,,,,,,I would doubt it because they would never make such a definitive and narrow minded statement] certainly does not apply to them.

I suggest reading the various types of mental illnesses and the symptoms associated with them before you pass judgement. Wink

Solitude breeds contemplation which creates clarity. 

Environment molds a person. Perseverance changes them. 

                                                                   WOLFDOG 

lampliter
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wolfdog1226 wrote:
lampliter wrote:
Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality. Hat although a good writer can portray truth using fantasy.(Walt Disney).

First I will say there are many types of mental illness. Perhaps the ONLY flavor of that “May” apply to your opinion, would be Schizophrenia.

I would disagree with that As a “Totally” inclusive statement, which is the way you wrote it.

I imagine your OPINION would not sit well with someone on here who has admitted to being mentally ill. I can not speak for them.

Although, I find it insulting.

I can speak for my Friend Barbara and Bill,,,your opinion which is FAR from Diagnosis[Are you a Doctor,,,,,,,,,I would doubt it because they would never make such a definitive and narrow minded statement] certainly does not apply to them.

I suggest reading the various types of mental illnesses and the symptoms associated with them before you pass judgement. Wink

Not a doctor; worked as a mental health tec for about 10 years; from severe and profound to high functioning.
Not a judge.

"The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.” ~ U.S. Senator William H. Borah (1865-1940) affectionately known as the "Lion of Idaho"

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wolfdog1226 wrote:
lampliter wrote:
Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality. Hat although a good writer can portray truth using fantasy.(Walt Disney).

First I will say there are many types of mental illness. Perhaps the ONLY flavor of that “May” apply to your opinion, would be Schizophrenia.

I would disagree with that As a “Totally” inclusive statement, which is the way you wrote it.

I imagine your OPINION would not sit well with someone on here who has admitted to being mentally ill. I can not speak for them.

Although, I find it insulting.


I don’t find it insulting. But I do find it detached from the reality I live in.

In my case it was not about the sense of reality but purely about poor emotions management.

wolfdog1226
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lampliter wrote:
wolfdog1226 wrote:
lampliter wrote:
Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality. Hat although a good writer can portray truth using fantasy.(Walt Disney).

First I will say there are many types of mental illness. Perhaps the ONLY flavor of that “May” apply to your opinion, would be Schizophrenia.

I would disagree with that As a “Totally” inclusive statement, which is the way you wrote it.

I imagine your OPINION would not sit well with someone on here who has admitted to being mentally ill. I can not speak for them.

Although, I find it insulting.

I can speak for my Friend Barbara and Bill,,,your opinion which is FAR from Diagnosis[Are you a Doctor,,,,,,,,,I would doubt it because they would never make such a definitive and narrow minded statement] certainly does not apply to them.

I suggest reading the various types of mental illnesses and the symptoms associated with them before you pass judgement. Wink

Not a doctor; worked as a mental health tec for about 10 years; from severe and profound to high functioning.
Not a judge.

I would think you should know better then.

“Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality.”

That right there is JUDGEMENTAL,,,that right there is NOT true.

My friends suffer from Depression,that has NOTHING to do with NOT knowing the difference between make believe and reality!! They understand reality and can function in society with the help of medication and supportive friends,,NOT people who stigmatize them.

Solitude breeds contemplation which creates clarity. 

Environment molds a person. Perseverance changes them. 

                                                                   WOLFDOG 

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I suffered from depression and anxiety since I was about 8 or 9. I was on medication since then since I also had ADD. I saw therapists but never found real relief, I feel they didn’t treat depression in young people as serious back then which was the mid 90s. My biggest mistake was self medicating with alcohol and drugs. They made the anxiety and depression go away for awhile but created worse problems. About ten years ago I decided I had to make a change so I quit drinking and smoking and all the other stuff and started taking my medication properly. I got heavily into exercise and going to church for support. It still is very difficult at times but I always remember that it doesn’t last forever and does get better.

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I think three things are important. Your everyday job, your hobby or free tíme and friends/girlfriend… Som things needs everybody.I remember when i was unemployed for a long tíme.. I change… Just example..

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lampliter
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Mental illness is a very broad and far reaching subject, the nuances of which cannot be discussed properly on this forum.
My comments were not meant to open a can of worms or a Pandora’s Box; only meant to throw some light on this subject which has been studied for many years by some of the most intelligent people on the planet.
Still mental illness in all its forms exists.

In some instances we found that changing the diet of some clients had very good results.
Also there is a very good book called Switch on Your Brain by Dr Caroline Leaf.

"The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.” ~ U.S. Senator William H. Borah (1865-1940) affectionately known as the "Lion of Idaho"

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One of the most important things noeadays around the mental healt is to be maximum offline in my opinion. Why not to debate about it..

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Changing the diét? How?

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hank
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This Scientific American article made sense of my life up to that point, for me. Why camping out always cheered me up. Why getting up at 5am to run til the sun came up always helped.

https://web.mit.edu/dick/www/pdf/649.pdf

Quote:
Scientific American January 1989
Carbohydrates and Depression

Several related behavioral disorders recognized in the past decade are characterized by disturbances of appetite and mood. One of the best-known is seasonal affective disorder, or SAD

I started building bright light boxes immediately, and eventually discovered dawn simulators
(best affordable ones are from: http://windhovermfg.com/) and learned about timing bright lights from the site cet.org (which has an excellent self-survey to decide how to time bright lights during the day).

More here: https://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/07/22/seasonal-affective-disorder-th-1
and here: https://psychcentral.com/blog/light-and-dark/

Quote:
Light and Dark Therapies is a simple explanation of the principles involved in light regulation. It discusses the difference between blue and yellow light, talks about circadian rhythms, the role of lithium, regulating sleep cycles, and more.

and here: https://psycheducation.org/treatment/bipolar-disorder-light-and-darkness/

One observation — SAD treatment is most helpful if started in August (N. Hemisphere fall) (we have the dawn simulator and light boxes set for approximately a late August “day length” period of bright/blue light every day; it’s easy to start to slip into winter depression as the days start to get shorter (the clock change in October tends to hit hard).

It’s a lot more difficult to clamber out of the pit by this time of year, though light treatment does help.

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I’m realizing things I and others chalked up to “laziness” or “lack of motivation” along with other traits I just thought were fundamental to me or bad habits are probably indicators of ADHD and am beginning the process for an assessment. I had some inaccurate ideas about the condition and never even considered it as a cause of some of my issues till I stumbled on a podcast where others were discussing their experiences dealing with it which fit me to a “T”.

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I always wondered how much was nature, and how much was nurture.

So if you come from a screwball family, do you either succumb to your environment/surroundings (victim), or get ornery enough to just not let them win (victor)?

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I have found that sunlight, or better put, the lack of sunlight in the higher latitudes in the winter season affects me. I had mild depression in winter back home at latitude 50° N. Extended periods of cloudy weather, constant grey cloudy skies, also affect me. Just one more reason I love where I now; 35° N. I cannot imagine living further north.

I do have family members with more serious mental illness running back through a couple generations. For those the right meds have helped.

NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. There website is informative to help understand the issues.

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wolfdog1226 wrote:

“Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality.”

That right there is JUDGEMENTAL,,,that right there is NOT true.

My friends suffer from Depression,that has NOTHING to do with NOT knowing the difference between make believe and reality!! They understand reality and can function in society with the help of medication and supportive friends,,NOT people who stigmatize them.
Depression actually has a lot to do with not being able to discern the “real” from the “not real”. That isn’t judgmental. It’s the truth. To say that someone who suffers from mental illness “doesn’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality.” might not be a “nice” way of saying it, but it’s still true. The medication your friends are taking probably is made to deal with this exact fact, in a physical way. Telling the truth about a “condition” isn’t the same as “stigmatizing” someone.

There is a lot of mental illness in my family, on my mom’s side. I don’t know how far back, but my mom’s mom was mentally ill, all of her children (my mom and her siblings) were all mentally ill, probably a lot of it from the insane abuse they suffered, but also some of it genetically. My three sisters and brother have all been diagnosed with various mental illnesses. I’ve never been diagnosed with any mental illness, thank God. But I know there are times when I have episodes of probably some form of depression.

I’m a very meta thinking person. I think about what I’m thinking about. When I go through “hard” times mentally/emotionally, I have to tell myself it’s not real. That doesn’t change how I feel in the moment, but it makes a difference in how I actually deal with it when it happens. I can usually maintain control of myself when I feel completely out of control inside. I can make good decisions even though I feel like I don’t want to. But I have to “make” this happen. I have to “choose” to remember and believe the truth, because, in that moment, truth doesn’t exist for me. It’s only a memory. I’m not a doctor, but I can imagine that people who aren’t advanced metacognitive like me can actually become completely detached from reality by depression, anxiety, bi-polar disorder, etc.

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DavidEF wrote:
wolfdog1226 wrote:

“Mentally ill people don’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality.”

That right there is JUDGEMENTAL,,,that right there is NOT true.

My friends suffer from Depression,that has NOTHING to do with NOT knowing the difference between make believe and reality!! They understand reality and can function in society with the help of medication and supportive friends,,NOT people who stigmatize them.
Depression actually has a lot to do with not being able to discern the “real” from the “not real”. That isn’t judgmental. It’s the truth. To say that someone who suffers from mental illness “doesn’t know the difference between the “land of make believe” and reality.” might not be a “nice” way of saying it, but it’s still true. The medication your friends are taking probably is made to deal with this exact fact, in a physical way. Telling the truth about a “condition” isn’t the same as “stigmatizing” someone.
The medicine I was taking was blocking serotonine reabsorption.

I’ve seen cases of people who strongly denied reality. Not the case with most I’ve seen though. That’s my truth.
And I’ve seen some strong reality denial in healthy people as well.

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Lightbringer wrote:
I always wondered how much was nature, and how much was nurture.

So if you come from a screwball family, do you either succumb to your environment/surroundings (victim), or get ornery enough to just not let them win (victor)?


I’m not a doctor, so this will involve a great deal of speculation on my part. My belief is that nature is the foundation that nurture builds upon. Nature defines the basic shape of the individual physically, mentally, and emotionally. Siblings brought up in the same home under the same nurture, can turn out vastly differently from each other. Sometimes siblings will grow up in an abusive family, and one or more of them will become insanely successful in life, while the others become incapable of even functioning in society. The opposite can also happen. The home could have been “perfect” and children can still turn out to have problems. That’s why it’s often said that parenting isn’t and shouldn’t be a one-size-fits-all approach. People screw up their own children sometimes by trying too hard to be fair. Each child should be parented separately.

I’ve seen in my own family how nature and nurture interact to produce various results in people who should be genetically similar, and are raised together under the same nurture standard. It makes sense if you think about the millions of decisions we make in our lifetimes, and realize that no decision is ever completely black-and-white. There’s always some gradient. Nature and nurture both influence where you’ll be on the gradient of each decision, sometimes working together to push you toward one end of the scale, other times working against each other, so it’s difficult to be decisive at all. It’s amazing how nuanced our minds really are. That explains why small chemical changes in our bodies can create huge mental health swings too. Not only that, but the environment we continue to live in can continue to influence our mental state pretty dramatically.

The Cycle of Goodness: “No one prospers without rendering benefit to others”
- The YKK Philosophy

DavidEF
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Agro wrote:

The medicine I was taking was blocking serotonine reabsorption.

I’ve seen cases of people who strongly denied reality. Not the case with most I’ve seen though. That’s my truth.
And I’ve seen some strong reality denial in healthy people as well.


I guess if we’re going to talk about it much more, we should stop and define what it is we’re talking about. I think there’s a difference between conscious and unconscious “reality denial”. I also believe there’s a physical condition (or maybe more than one) which can result in the mind becoming incapable of even understanding that there is such a thing as real vs not real. We tend to think in absolute limits sometimes that don’t exist. For example, the electromagnetic spectrum includes both light and sound waves, but we usually think of sound and light as being two distinctly different things. What about radio waves? Those are on the same spectrum, but we think of them being completely distinct from sound and light. What I was talking about when I said people can’t discern the difference between “real” and “not real” is basically the opposite of this effect. Imagine seeing a “spectrum” where normal people see a distinction of “real” and “not real”. That’s what I was talking about. The other, more conscious “reality denial” is a choice people make, and I’ve also seen people that I thought of as otherwise “normal” in their mental faculty, and even “very smart” by worldly standards make that awful choice.

The Cycle of Goodness: “No one prospers without rendering benefit to others”
- The YKK Philosophy

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