Ultimate LED Bulbs - Ultra High CRI - The Honorable Quest

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Barkuti
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And what is the reason to make your own led strips, when you can power up your leds with proper constant current led drivers?

Just a question, of course. Commercial led strips I've seen consist of links interconnected in parallel, and each link consisting in a few led emitters in series together with a resistor to drop excess voltage and current (links of 3 led emitters and a resistor for “12V” led strips, and links of 6 led emitters and a resistor for “24V” led strips). With such a setup not every link in the strip receives the same input voltage, this is because when you feed a strip from one of its ends, each ongoing link has to carry the input voltage to the next and there's a small drop in each of them, even if tiny. This rarely is a problem and is proportionally less pronounced in the higher voltage strips.

If I were to make my own strips for whatever reason, I would set in series as much leds as possible, and feed them with constant current led drivers. This ensures constant brightness and maximum electrical efficiency, as there is no need for ballast resistors. The easiest solution for this is probably to buy a commercial led strip, group together in series the links in the strip as much as possible, and feed this with an led driver…

In my opinion, though, I think it is way easier to buy a bunch of high power COB led chips, install each one of them on its own, adequately sized for its power heatsink, and feed each emitter with its own driver or multiple emitters with a single driver. This is easy to do, as for example a single 300mA current led driver rated for “36W” will output well above a hundred volts if enough led emitters in series are connected to it (30+), with no load output voltages dwelling way above that (a COB led chip is sort of and behaves like a bunch of leds in series, by the way). Others may think and believe differently, but if you know how to believe and what to do everything is safe despite of this.

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DustinH
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Barkuti wrote:

And what is the reason to make your own led strips, when you can power up your leds with proper constant current led drivers?

Just a question, of course. Commercial led strips I've seen consist of links interconnected in parallel, and each link consisting in a few led emitters in series together with a resistor to drop excess voltage and current (links of 3 led emitters and a resistor for “12V” led strips, and links of 6 led emitters and a resistor for “24V” led strips). With such a setup not every link in the strip receives the same input voltage, this is because when you feed a strip from one of its ends, each ongoing link has to carry the input voltage to the next and there's a small drop in each of them, even if tiny. This rarely is a problem and is proportionally less pronounced in the higher voltage strips.

If I were to make my own strips for whatever reason, I would set in series as much leds as possible, and feed them with constant current led drivers. This ensures constant brightness and maximum electrical efficiency, as there is no need for ballast resistors. The easiest solution for this is probably to buy a commercial led strip, group together in series the links in the strip as much as possible, and feed this with an led driver…

In my opinion, though, I think it is way easier to buy a bunch of high power COB led chips, install each one of them on its own, adequately sized for its power heatsink, and feed each emitter with its own driver or multiple emitters with a single driver. This is easy to do, as for example a single 300mA current led driver rated for “36W” will output well above a hundred volts if enough led emitters in series are connected to it (30+), with no load output voltages dwelling way above that (a COB led chip is sort of and behaves like a bunch of leds in series, by the way). Others may think and believe differently, but if you know how to believe and what to do everything is safe despite of this.

Yes what I'm looking for is some led strips that have very high CRI...so far I haven't had a lot of luck in my search, and what I have found has been pretty low power and I'd need something like $3000+ USD worth of lights...I just know there's better options out there. I know this isn't going to be a <$1000 project but it seems a ripoff to pay $3000 for just the strips themselves.

 

The reason why I favor many strips over a smaller amount of COBs is because with strips the light would be spread more evenly, and if I needed to lower the light closer to the plants, with COBs that leads to much smaller regions that are really intense. With strips there's more light sources, more dispersed and this actually leads to a limit where the plants can get a lot closer and the light spread will still be even enough to not burn sections.

 

Also I may be wrong here but it seems that if I were to mount strips on aluminum channels or extrusions this would be sufficient for cooling. The COB style grow lights I've seen usually have either a compact fan powered heatsink or a very large passive heatsinks and I'm wanting to avoid that if possible.

 

When it comes to powering the lights that is an area where I need to do more research, I know it's probably pretty simple but I really don't want to mess that up and damage the chips. Dimming is more of a requirement than a "nice to have" feature.

 

Are most LED strips dimmable?

aherklp
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Here’s a CRI98 strip https://item.taobao.com/item.htm?id=606903159696 about $4 – $8 a meter, a roll is 5 meters.

Barkuti
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DustinH wrote:

The reason why I favor many strips over a smaller amount of COBs is because with strips the light would be spread more evenly, and if I needed to lower the light closer to the plants, with COBs that leads to much smaller regions that are really intense. With strips there's more light sources, more dispersed and this actually leads to a limit where the plants can get a lot closer and the light spread will still be even enough to not burn sections.

 

Also I may be wrong here but it seems that if I were to mount strips on aluminum channels or extrusions this would be sufficient for cooling. The COB style grow lights I've seen usually have either a compact fan powered heatsink or a very large passive heatsinks and I'm wanting to avoid that if possible.

But did you checked Juhong's lineup? The manufacturer sells small sunlight spectrum COBs too, with 5W and 10W rated power units. These you can run at rated current/power, or half of it for longer life. Could buy a bunch and install them on cheap as chips heatsinks like these, with just 5W or less per emitter your light will be quite evenly spread. The spectrum is also comparatively better to that of high CRI emitters designed for human visual usage.

For high CRI led strips you can check out this thread: SKV89's LED Strips and bulbs test results.

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h2o
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cutter.au.com (@welight here) has quite a selection of what you want. Shipping isn't free, but he makes and delivers what's promised. These are not flexible rolls, but strips made on rigid al. There are many choices in high CRI. They have a Juki robot now for making this stuff look here "link to some LED strips":https://www.cutter.com.au/product-category/diy-led-kits/horticulture-lig... There is a plethora of choices including Optisolis, cree, and Cutter branded red enhanced budget 98CRI. He has spectral graphs for some. Grow room PAR numbers for some, etc

DustinH wrote:

Hey fellas!

 I'm new to this forum, I actually stumbled across this place because of this thread.

 I did see the beginning of the thread that has a chart with some high CRI chips, I was wondering if there's a list of available US bulbs for home use that have very high CRI, and also if if there's any strips(flex or rigid may both work) that utilize very high CRI chips.

 I have a couple projects, one I'm just wanting to update my home lighting because I'm not satisfied with the CREE bulbs(although they are way better than the GE Reveal bulbs they replaced due to terrible lifespan).

 The other project is what I need strips for, I want to experiment making my own grow light setup using very high CRI chips and compare that to a high grade LED grow light. Grow light manufacturers are obsessed with efficiency and quality definitely comes as a lower priority...this makes sense because most indoor growers are growing cannabis and being profitable is their main goal. I am going to be growing peppers and vegetables and I am more focused on light quality, I am thinking the closer I can get to mimicking the sun's spectrum the healthier and faster the plants will grow. I know the efficiency of the higher CRI LEDs that have a violet emitter and/or additional phosphors will obviously not be as good as the chips made for horticulture.  I won't pretend I know much about this stuff yet, so if I'm mistaken please let me know.

 Has anyone here done a similar project, or have any tips or products you would recommend?

 I know I have a lot of learning to do, but I like the idea of that. This site has so much information it's hard to know where to get started!

 Thanks,

- Dustin

Evgeniy
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SKV89 wrote:
I just purchased a new batch of this bulb and the DUV is pretty bad. It starts out at 0.0025 and goes down to about 0.0010 after an hour. Does anyone have any recommendations for high CRI GU10 bulbs that are below the BBL?

Philips expert color gu10 tests

Flashlights : custom (Jaxman E2L with led4power LD-4 drivers and 3xOsram CQAR.CC), custom Skillhunt H03 with Osram 3К/4К, Zebralight {H600fc IV, Sc600fc IV, H600fc III}, Jaxman E2(N219b), Convoy UV.
Previous: Zebralight {H501, H600W, H600W II, H602W}, NiteCore TIPCRI, A A01, Fenix L2D CE/CEQ5.

Evgeniy
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aherklp wrote:
This is the best LED bulb I’ve found so far, use the Translate function in Chrome.

https://item.taobao.com/item.htm?id=654264933998

Pretty pricy, I got a couple on order.

Very nice digit’s and graph’s in description.

“best LED bulb” or “best description of LED bulb” ?
Are you tested it ?
Or, may be, anyone tested it?

Flashlights : custom (Jaxman E2L with led4power LD-4 drivers and 3xOsram CQAR.CC), custom Skillhunt H03 with Osram 3К/4К, Zebralight {H600fc IV, Sc600fc IV, H600fc III}, Jaxman E2(N219b), Convoy UV.
Previous: Zebralight {H501, H600W, H600W II, H602W}, NiteCore TIPCRI, A A01, Fenix L2D CE/CEQ5.

Barkuti
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Barkuti wrote:

I think I have a couple 4000K & 5000K “sunlight spectrum” output spectrum files somewhere in my desktop computer, they were published long ago by some eastern europe buyer in the AliExpress product reviews section, and I downloaded them. They had infrareds. Will check later.

Just remembered, and here they are (for DustinH and others interested):

 

4000K 50W sunlight spectrum COB

This was claimed to be the spectrum graph for a 4000K 50W sunlight spectrum COB.

 

This was claimed to be the spectrum graph for a 5000K 50W sunlight spectrum COB.

 

As you can see these have both UV and infrarred emission, providing light which resembles natural light better than any other standard high CRI leds. As I said before, I found these buyer submitted spectrum graphs long ago in Juhong's store. Nothing else to say.

Deleting a just published post causes the forum thread answer notification to fail. Thus, if you need to change your just published post, edit it. Thanks.

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