AA / AAA Voltage Ranges??

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Witterings
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AA / AAA Voltage Ranges??

I know the voltage ranges on Lipo batteries from flying RC things for years but I don’t know what ranges of low voltage / cut off and fully charged are with AA / AAA NiMH batteries.

Also like with Lipos the cut off is 4.2v but 2/3days after a charge they settle around 4.18 and hold it and certainly in RC planes you can set a low voltage alarm but that tends to be under load say at 3.5v and 10 mins after taking that load off they bounce back to around 3.7v.

Appreciate that may be a high cut off voltage in torch terms but when you have something drawing 45amps and it get’s totally destroyed if you don’t have enough juice to land it when it’s way off in the distance when the alarm goes off it’s just playing safe.

Do AA / AA’s perform in a similar way so say you have a walk around the house phone or in a torch that has cut off, what’s the lowest level they’ll be set to and will they bounce a bit off that low 10 mins or so after removal and give a higher reading???

Any input much appreciated.

ggf31416
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Check https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Eneloop%20AA%20BK-3MCCE%201900mAh%20(White)%202019%20UK.html

In short they are ~1.4V fully charged (~1.35V after a few days), their discharge curve is rather flat and they are empty around ~1.1V depending on the load. NiMH is certainly safer than Li-ion, charging an overdischarged NiMH cell is not dangerous (at least under normal circumstances). In my experience single AA flashlight don’t drain the cell below 0.75V unless they are meant to be ‘battery vampires’.

Witterings
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ggf31416 wrote:
Check https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Eneloop%20AA%20BK-3MCCE%201900mAh%20(White)%202019%20UK.html

In short they are ~1.4V fully charged (~1.35V after a few days), their discharge curve is rather flat and they are empty around ~1.1V depending on the load. NiMH is certainly safer than Li-ion, charging an overdischarged NiMH cell is not dangerous (at least under normal circumstances). In my experience single AA flashlight don’t drain the cell below 0.75V unless they are meant to be ‘battery vampires’.

Brilliant … thanks a lot for that, much appreciated!! Thumbs Up