"Warmer" CCT LED Car Headlights

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Rayoui
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A filter would work but since filters are subtractive, it would significantly reduce the output of the headlights.

cetary
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This is interesting! It looks like Morimoto is coming out with 3000K LED sealed lights. You can read more here. The photo they show on that thread, assuming that’s the 3000K model in that pickup, they look pretty nice. I wish I could ditch the 6500K blue-rich junk in my car.

BOO5TED
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cetary wrote:
This is interesting! It looks like Morimoto is coming out with 3000K LED sealed lights. You can read more here. The photo they show on that thread, assuming that’s the 3000K model in that pickup, they look pretty nice. I wish I could ditch the 6500K blue-rich junk in my car.

Was just about to post the same thing.

"America has three cities, New York, San Francisco and New Orleans. Everywhere else is Cleveland."- Tennessee Williams

 

 

NeutralFan
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cetary wrote:
NeutralFan wrote:

There are a lot of websites that compare halogen, HID, LED, and laser headlights.

Here’s one from BMW: Half a mile visibility with a BMW laserlight

“using laserlight headlights to enhance high beams provides a much greater range than traditional LEDs”

But that resource still doesn’t prove your point that “warm white LED high beams are not feasible.” Furthermore, how many carmakers are actually putting LEPs in car headlights? It’s been years since development started on that, and you can count all the models of cars on your fingers that have them.

I also found this nice resource from the University of Transportation in Michigan.. Their research was conducted years ago, and they used 4000K LED headlights, and that was way back when you took a big hit in output from the warmer tints. Now, the outputs have leveled out, or a very close to. I know years ago 3000K hit parity with 4000K and 5000K for LED streetlighting, and now 2700K is near parity to. Their research said to use the warmest CCT feasible, and they were successfully testing 4000K models…

Not sure why you are quoting me as saying “warm white LED high beams are not feasible” since I didn’t say that. I stated that cooler CCT LEDs have more lumens than warmer LEDs which could by why auto makers are using them.

I’d rather use my flashlight around the house than turn on the lights.

cetary
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Your orginal reply..

Quote:
It seems the cooler LEDs for headlights are used for the extra lumens and less heat vs the warmer CCTs. And when it comes to high beams, the LEDs aren’t good enough when compared to halogen or HID. So some of the auto makers (like BMW) are using lasers.

At the very least you implied warm white LEDs aren’t feasible for highbeams. In any event, it’s really nice to see one of the first 3000K LED headlights hit the market.

buck91
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cetary wrote:
This is interesting! It looks like Morimoto is coming out with 3000K LED sealed lights. You can read more here. The photo they show on that thread, assuming that’s the 3000K model in that pickup, they look pretty nice. I wish I could ditch the 6500K blue-rich junk in my car.

Looks like limited application but maybe they will expand? 3000k seems a bit too warm so hopefully they are really in the 3500+ range… Would be great for fogs, though.

xevious
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This is really fascinating. Just how would LEP work for cars? Is the intention to use a special lens for it? Because a pencil beam that projects for a mile… doesn’t sound very practical & useful.

cetary
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buck91 wrote:
Looks like limited application but maybe they will expand? 3000k seems a bit too warm so hopefully they are really in the 3500+ range… Would be great for fogs, though.

Given the research from UMTRI, I would say go as warm as you can. Going higher up, past 3500K, and you start sacrificing the reduced blue that warm tinted LEDs have, and you wind gradually sliding backwards to where we are today. Though, that being said, I would still be “happier” with even 4000K given the horrendous 6500K+ that seems to be most common.

TheIntruder
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xevious wrote:
This is really fascinating. Just how would LEP work for cars? Is the intention to use a special lens for it? Because a pencil beam that projects for a mile… doesn’t sound very practical & useful.

BMW and Audi first introduced LEP high beams in their high-end sports cars back in 2014.

The trickle down to more mainstream models has been slow, but it’s not new territory, and like any other source of light, it’s harnessed through different methods for the intended purpose.

They’re more efficient, and can serve as a single-source, but the other parts of the equation — cost, and regulation — pose constraints.

The costs have to come down, and in the U.S. at least, the laggardly regulators have yet to approve adaptive matrix headlights. The recently passed infrastructure legislation has directed them to do so within two years, so at least one barrier has been overcome, and the luxury brands can bring the feature to the U.S.

xevious
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TheIntruder wrote:
xevious wrote:
This is really fascinating. Just how would LEP work for cars? Is the intention to use a special lens for it? Because a pencil beam that projects for a mile… doesn’t sound very practical & useful.

BMW and Audi first introduced LEP high beams in their high-end sports cars back in 2014.

The trickle down to more mainstream models has been slow, but it’s not new territory, and like any other source of light, it’s harnessed through different methods for the intended purpose.

They’re more efficient, and can serve as a single-source, but the other parts of the equation — cost, and regulation — pose constraints.

The costs have to come down, and in the U.S. at least, the laggardly regulators have yet to approve adaptive matrix headlights. The recently passed infrastructure legislation has directed them to do so within two years, so at least one barrier has been overcome, and the luxury brands can bring the feature to the U.S.

Thanks, very interesting. I wonder if there’s any merit to having “road” and “off-road” settings for the high beams. Meaning when off road, the special setting would raise the LEP array just a little for further projection.
TheIntruder
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