Foodie tip: The best eggs, Jerry

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xevious
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Foodie tip: The best eggs, Jerry

I love eggs. I can’t imagine living without eating them. They are relatively inexpensive and also, can be made to be one of the most satisfyingly tasteful things to eat. The baking industry (especially breads, desserts, etc.) would essentially suffer without them (there are egg substitutes, but… “meh”).

There are as many opinions and preferences about eggs as there are ways to make them. I think a great many of them are terrific, but being an “eggologist” by hobby, I’ve made my own observations on what’s the best way to prepare an egg. I won’t go into a super long spiel about it, as one could reference hours of material. But the upshot is this: the yolk.

The yolk is where it’s at. That’s the essential flavor of the egg. And thus, how it is cooked means everything. Of course, one can blend it up into the egg white and create some tasteful things, but by itself…the yolk is really a jewel. So it needs to be cooked properly. Undercooked, and it’s a runny, sticky mess. Overcooked, and it’s like eating sulfur cake. What you want, ideally, is to cook them just enough such that they’re barely runny. Almost like a gel. A touch less, and you’ll have a more gooey experience. A little more, and you’ll have this orangey “nougat” that’s soft & delicious.

My technique is to essentially “steam” eggs rather than boil them. You can get these “spacers” made of heat proof silicone that cradle the eggs and help them stand up straight in a pot. You pour in the water so that the spacers are almost covered, just a bit of the egg tip (situated fat side up) in the water. If you’re starting with hot water, steam for about 6 to 7 minutes depending upon the size of the eggs and the number of them in the pot. After that time, turn off the heat and let them sit for another 3 ~ 4 minutes. Finally, immerse in a cold bath. After stirring around for about 30 seconds, dump the water and pour in more cold water. Let sit for a couple minutes. If the water still feels more than lukewarm, dump and refill with cold water again. Feel free to take out an egg at any point during this to eat.

Experiment on your timing. It took me a while to get these numbers. I generally cook extra large to jumbo sized eggs and do 4 to 6 at a time. I DO find that in terms of timing based on number of eggs, there’s not a geometric progression in time needed. Thus, 4 extra large eggs will require 6 minutes, but 6 jumbo shouldn’t need more than 7 minutes. Also… you will find timing differences depending upon whether or not the eggs have been taken directly from the refrigerator or were nearing room temperature sitting on the kitchen counter.

One other tip: if you cook a bunch more eggs than you plan to eat in one sitting, do not— repeat , do not peel all of them. While peeling is easier while the egg is very warm, once peeled the egg will shed water while sitting in the fridge. You don’t want it to lose moisture.

Once cooked, I eat the eggs in several ways. One, if I’m a bit rushed, I just eat it as-is. I dash a little salt on, take a bite, then repeat until all eaten. My favorite thing is to toast some nice multi-grain bread or an English muffin, apply some butter (option: add on some cheese, microwave for 12 seconds), then mash on some avocado, layer on a piece of bacon, then take the egg, cut directly in half length-wise, placing the halves cut side down. Garnish with some fresh ground pepper and maybe a dash of salt. I’ve also taken to cutting the egg up into “medallions” and arranging over one side of toast, then putting on some ham, cheese, and other things. You’d be amazed at how good roasted red peppers can accentuate an egg sandwich.

So for the egg lovers out there in BLF-land, what’s your take on the incredible, edible egg?

Edited by: xevious on 08/06/2022 - 14:00
brad
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A piece of bread on a plate, smother it with diced onions, pour chili over it all, cover with shredded sharp cheddar cheese, lay two over easy eggs on top of that.

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

TIFisher
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Good Lord…is cooking/eating eggs this complicated?

raccoon city
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My mom is allergic to eggs.

I'm not, but I don't like food that tastes like eggs.

It's fine if the food has egg in it, but I just don't like the taste of eggs.

When it comes to food, I'm pretty picky.

:BEER:

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If each bite of your egg sandwich doesn’t come with the risk of hot liquid yolk shooting out across your cheek, are you really even eating breakfast?

xevious
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TIFisher wrote:
Good Lord…is cooking/eating eggs this complicated?
Not at all… this is about stepping up your egg game. Wink Big Smile Cool
brad
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TIFisher wrote:
Good Lord…is cooking/eating eggs this complicated?

Eggs are easy to cook but it takes cooking skills to make them perfect.

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

TIFisher
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xevious wrote:
TIFisher wrote:
Good Lord…is cooking/eating eggs this complicated?
Not at all… this is about stepping up your egg game. Wink Big Smile Cool

Ha!! Will try it. Always up for some experimentation. Variety is the spice of life they say.

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Try Chinese century eggs.
I eat them on the streets of Hangzhou some time ago. Would do it again for sure.
Mike

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If you really have some huevos, try a Balut Egg….. Sick

sp5it wrote:
Try Chinese century eggs. I eat them on the streets of Hangzhou some time ago. Would do it again for sure. Mike
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Eggs are good; duck duck eggs are the best.

Quote: “The yolk is where it’s at”

Yes, and duck eggs have a larger yolk to white ratio. Big Smile The eggs are usually larger too.

FYI, some people who are allergic to eggs are actually allergic to chicken eggs and can eat duck eggs.

I use an instant pot to hard cook eggs. Timing varies with altitude as water boils at a lower temperature as altitude increases, almost a 1 degree F drop per 500 foot increase. So 198 F for me instead of 213 F. 92 C instead of 100 C. Makes a difference with many things.

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I have chickens and quail. I think right now I have 8 dozen chicken eggs sitting on the table. Something like 24 dozen quail eggs but I’m about to pickle a few gallons of those.

We used to raise ducks,geese, and turkeys. Duck eggs are good but rich as crap. If you normally eat 2 chicken eggs then one duck egg will normally do ya. Geese and turkey eggs are rich just like duck just bigger.

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Scrambled, fried, soft-boiled, hard-boiled, devil-eggs, egg-salad, I loooove eggs.

Rare that I have all the ingredients at once, but when I do, I like me some eggwiches. Toasted english-muffin, eggs, slice of murrrcan or cheddar cheese, sausage patty (doubled if they’re the paper-thin kind), butter, salt, pepper.

Can’t do poached to save my life.

Hate runny whites, so when I fry ‘em, I’ll separate the yolks, fry the whites as best I can on one side, then when almost done, dump in the yolks, let them gently cook while the whites tighten up the rest of the way. Otherwise it’s too easy to get egg-snot from the whites and have “hard-boiled” egg-yolk.

When I’m lazy and don’t want to make “real” devil-eggs I’ll just halve hard-boiled eggs, sprinkle with salt’n‘pepper, then put a dollop of mayo and dot of mustard on each half.

I like gelatinous yolks with s&p. They’re gooooooood eatin’.

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xevious
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MtnDon wrote:
Eggs are good; duck duck eggs are the best.
Quote: “The yolk is where it’s at”
Yes, and duck eggs have a larger yolk to white ratio. Big Smile The eggs are usually larger too.
FYI, some people who are allergic to eggs are actually allergic to chicken eggs and can eat duck eggs.
Had my first duck egg a few months ago. Our local LIDL happened to have them on special. It was weird… in the plastic 4-packs they’d been packaged within, many had cracked or were leaking. Started to make me wonder if commercial chicken eggs have harder shells due to specialized breeding. Anyway, I found the flavor a little odd. Just a very slight suggestion of “game.” I found scrambling was more enjoyable. They took a good bit longer to cook as semi-soft boiled. Anyway, will have to give them another try at some point. Unfortunately in regular supermarkets, they’re very expensive. At LIDL, they were on sale, $2 per 4-pack.
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Duck eggs have much thicker shells than chicken eggs. Because of this duck eggs can be stored much longer. We pay a local grower $8 a dozen. Mostly we scramble them or use them in a quiche. Though we also have some hard-cooked in egg salad sandwiches (Veganaise, finely chopped celery, and green onion).

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xevious wrote:
Started to make me wonder if commercial chicken eggs have harder shells due to specialized breeding.

Variation is there in chicken-eggs, too. The brown ones that come on the clear plastic cases need a good whack to crack ‘em. The white ones in the styrene-foam cases practically come pre-cracked, as they’re the proverbial paper-thin shells.

I just get whatever’s not 5-6bux/dozen.

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Lightbringer wrote:

Hate runny whites, so when I fry ‘em, I’ll separate the yolks, fry the whites as best I can on one side, then when almost done, dump in the yolks, let them gently cook while the whites tighten up the rest of the way.

I had never thought of that, it sounds like a fun idea to play with.

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

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We had geese growing up, the egg shells were really strong. Had one roll off a chest freezer onto a concrete floor and it didn’t even crack.

Fried eggs with Montreal steak seasoning on top. That’s the way to go.

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brad wrote:
Lightbringer wrote:
Hate runny whites, so when I fry ‘em, I’ll separate the yolks, fry the whites as best I can on one side, then when almost done, dump in the yolks, let them gently cook while the whites tighten up the rest of the way.

I had never thought of that, it sounds like a fun idea to play with.

Forgot to mention that once done on one side, I’ll flip the whites, then plop the yolks on top of them, so they don’t end up in direct contact with the pan.

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This post will address the joy and bliss of perfectly cooked microwave scrambled eggs.

Too many people don’t know that you can perfectly cook scrambled eggs via microwave. Here’s the simple trick: microwaves cook from the outside -in. Thus, you cannot flip the on switch and walk away. That causes the eggs to overcook on the outside and still be cold from the fridge on the inner part of the bowl. The trick is to put a pat of butter and cook it by itself just enough to melt. Crack your eggs in the bowl, add a tad of whip cram or half and half if you want extra smooth, then whip them or beat them with a fork. I put the eggs, with the fork still in it, right in the microwave and set the timer for 2 min.

At 15 seconds take them out and whip them up, then back in again.
At 12 seconds take them out and whip them up, then back in again.
At 10 seconds take them out and whip them up, then back in again.
At 8 seconds take them out and whip them up, then back in again.
At 6 seconds take them out and whip them up, then back in again.

At this point, you shouldn’t have any, or little, cooked eggs. It’s a very hot liquid egg mixture that is now ready to cook. Put it in for @10-12 seconds. Pull it out, flip them over and get the solids in the middle if needed, sprinkle salt and pepper, add cheese if you wish (I do). In for 5 more seconds and let them rest. They’ll continue to cook for a bit, if you note that the outside seems hard, then scrape it off the bowl. As microwaves come in various powers, you may need to adjust plus or minus times for yours, let the eggs be your guide.

Good to go, perfect microwave eggs.

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That was enlightening. Are we done now?

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I can see microwaves being able to cook scrambled that way, though tedious. But for semi-soft boiled? No way. The microwaves change the protein characteristics of the yolk & whites. Texture is weird. Taste isn’t right.

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I used to nuke farina similarly. Milk goes into the bowl, dump in the farina-sand, start nuking. Every 30sec start “whisking” with my eatin’ spoon. Once it starts to get clumpy, it’s 15sec, then 10. Once the milk’s hot and fizzing along the edges, keep “whipping”, and add a glob of butter. The butter doesn’t just impart its buttery goodness, but keeps the farina from sticking to the bowl somewhat.

Then just keep nuking it with the 10sec breaks ‘til it’s done. Yeah, you wear the Hell outta the latch and everything with the constant on/off, which is why I just said f it and started cooking it in a small frying-pan instead. Same principle, only just keep stirring it as it’s cooking vs the constant on/off/on/off, etc.

Hmmm, that’s what I feel like having right about now…

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Ever throw in some corn meal (polenta) into your grits? I’ve added some to steel cut oatmeal and it enriches the flavor.

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I could never eat more than one grit.

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xevious
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So LB, you’re a mono-grit kind of guy? Wink Big Smile

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Oh, they’re just soooooooooo filling…

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If you want scrambled eggs, I’ve become a fan of Gordon Ramsay’s method. Crack the eggs directly in a cold pan, and throw in a slab of butter – about 1 Tbsp for 6 eggs. Don’t add salt and pepper until the end – the salt makes them turn gray while they cook. Set a timer for 3 minutes, turn the burner to High, and start stirring. Alternate 30 seconds on the burner and 10 seconds lifted off, stirring the entire time. Just keep repeating that until done. Remove from pan and add salt & pepper.

Fast, easy, and consistent. Faster than the low-and-slow method, while pulling it off the heat every 30 seconds prevents them from burning or cooking too quickly. And as long as you are watching a timer, it’s easy to get consistent results every time.

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I did that once and the eggs were the best scrambled eggs I’ve ever tasted.

I’m too lazy to do that every time for myself but if you want to impress someone who will notice the difference, then there it is.

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

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I loooooved the low’n‘slow method ‘til tacky like custard, but didn’t like leaving half of them in the pan.

For me, now, it’s a small cast-Fe skillet, melt the butter while it’s still heating up full blast, dump in the eggs when only half the butter melted, then just keep pulling the edges to the middle ‘til they’re mostly set, grab’n‘flip sections when possible to cook the snot-side, kill the heat entirely, and keep doing the flip part ‘til cooked, then slide ‘em off onto the plate.

Still soft, maybe only a dot of eggstoff left in the middle of the pan, and fast to cook.

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Shakshuka is nice but I rarely find the time to make it. Or fried eggs on roasted potatoes with onions when I have some cooked potatoes left. Scrambled eggs for breakfast. Fried eggs on toast if I have little time.

I’m allergic, so medication is needed Facepalm .

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