Power outage lantern for elderly parents?

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Kerosene
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Power outage lantern for elderly parents?

Hello everyone,
I’m looking for a simple lantern for my elderly parents to use during power outages.

I’ve recently got myself a LT1S, which I LOVE, and am tempted to get one for my parents, but I’m concerned they could get lost in the UI.
They have no probs with charging things from a phone charger, so any 21700/18650 with a built in USB charger would be suitable.
It’s just the UI I’m concerned about.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS
-Simple L/M/H type of UI
-No “deep UI”, preferably no strobe or SOS or red, etc.
-Warm light
-AA batteries (at worst), or 21700/18650 with a built in USB charger
-Size and weight doesn’t matter
-Waterproof and shockproof doesn’t matter
-Hanging hook doesn’t matter
-Extended battery life doesn’t matter, 5 hours of “medium” light between charges is enough
-Budget around MAX $75 USD

Thanks.

zoulas
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Not trying to change the topic here but I don’t think it’s safe for anyone elderly to be walking around a pitch dark home with a flashlight.

Kerosene
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zoulas wrote:
I don’t think it’s safe for anyone elderly to be walking around a pitch dark home with a flashlight.

I’ve taken away their flashlights for exactly that reason. Now they just sit in the dark.

Rexlion
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I imagine the elderly grandparents would feel more comfortable with a couple of candles. Sad

Maybe a Lepro? You can get 4 of the little ones for $28. They are battery vampires (no regulation) so a dimmer output will continue for hours.

== We save the planet from darkness ==

texas shooter
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I ceiling bounce a regular flashlight to light the house. Lots more options.

xxo
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nitecore LR60.

nicodimus22
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If you’re concerned about them getting lost in Anduril, place it into simple mode. The odds of them correctly entering the input to enter advanced mode is remote.

SIGShooter
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zoulas wrote:
Not trying to change the topic here but I don’t think it’s safe for anyone elderly to be walking around a pitch dark home with a flashlight.
What do you consider as elderly? I’m 70+ and I certainly consider myself capable of walking around in a pitch dark home with a flashlight. Heck I even consider myself capable of walking around the house in the dark with a flashlight and…….scissors Shocked

You think it’s safer for someone to walk around the house in the dark without any lighting (you did say anyone elderly without any qualifications)?

Mandrake50
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How about something like THIS

Easy to find batteries. Super simple UI. Now this is not necessarily what I would recommend, it just showed up with a search for D Cell LED lantern. I am sure there are many others. Maybe better even. But with just a dial for brightness (can’t get much more intuitive) and 500 hours on low. Pretty bright on the top end (though maybe not 750 lumens). Maybe a decent option. Something like this and a 12 pack of D cells and they would be set for anything short of Armageddon.

bushmaster
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SIGShooter wrote:
zoulas wrote:
Not trying to change the topic here but I don’t think it’s safe for anyone elderly to be walking around a pitch dark home with a flashlight.
What do you consider as elderly? I’m 70+ and I certainly consider myself capable of walking around in a pitch dark home with a flashlight. Heck I even consider myself capable of walking around the house in the dark with a flashlight and…….scissors Shocked

You think it’s safer for someone to walk around the house in the dark without any lighting (you did say anyone elderly without any qualifications)?


I agree! I too am an “elderly parent” and I resemble some of previous remarks. Wink

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Del Gue

SIGShooter
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Rexlion wrote:
I imagine the elderly grandparents would feel more comfortable with a couple of candles. Sad

Maybe a Lepro? You can get 4 of the little ones for $28. They are battery vampires (no regulation) so a dimmer output will continue for hours.

I don’t see what the big deal is about carrying around a flashlight, and carrying candles is a recipe for starting a fire in my opinion.

I’m a grandparent and 70+ and I consider myself capable of using a flashlight. Facepalm

To answer the OP’s question we had a power outage the other night and I pulled out my LT lantern for the living room and a BLF Q8 to use when I was walking around the house. Not particularly hard to use of course, as in press switch and light comes on, ramp light to desired level, and press to turn off.

Even lights with complicated UI’s aren’t a big deal to use just to get light. Granted that some have the ability to be configured in many ways but to get light one just has to press the switch (long, short, whatever). If my wife can turn on my lights to see her away around in the dark then anyone can Big Smile

SIGShooter
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bushmaster wrote:
SIGShooter wrote:
zoulas wrote:
Not trying to change the topic here but I don’t think it’s safe for anyone elderly to be walking around a pitch dark home with a flashlight.
What do you consider as elderly? I’m 70+ and I certainly consider myself capable of walking around in a pitch dark home with a flashlight. Heck I even consider myself capable of walking around the house in the dark with a flashlight and…….scissors Shocked

You think it’s safer for someone to walk around the house in the dark without any lighting (you did say anyone elderly without any qualifications)?


I agree! I too am an “elderly parent” and I resemble some of previous remarks. Wink
I think what’s considered elderly (as in unable to function well with tasks) has changed over the decades. When I was a kid I thought that anyone in their 60’s was decrepit and in need of assistance with most things. That’s because the people I knew in that age group were pretty much that way. Things have changed over the years for many reasons and people in their 60’s and 70’s may not be in any more need than those in their 50’s.

Of course things in less developed parts of the world, or even poorer parts of developed countries, can be much different with respect to aging.

zoulas
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A flashlight is not an ideal solution for illumination of a space during a power outage. It’s really a “better than nothing” solution.

A few battery powered lanterns may be a better choice as they would be stationary.

You have too many things to worry about during an outage, add to it carrying around a flashlight only further complicates things.

My statement above is regardless of age.

What are you supposed to do if you have a walker, or a cane, or if you have to take medicine? A flashlight is really not ideal for a power outage.

BadTeacher
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When my parents were still alive — I bought 3 plug in lights at Home Depot —- you set them on Auto ( Hall , Bedroom ,Kitchen) when the power goes off they come on automatically ( that’s the dangerous part, getting caught in the dark trying to get to a flashlight) — then if you want a flashlight just unplug it from the wall

We have one in each of our Hallways — They work great
These are similiar

https://www.amazon.com/Bluetech-Flashlight-Emergency-Preparedness-Detect...

zoulas
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BadTeacher wrote:
When my parents were still alive — I bought 3 plug in lights at Home Depot —- you set them on Auto ( Hall , Bedroom ,Kitchen) when the power goes off they come on automatically ( that’s the dangerous part, getting caught in the dark trying to get to a flashlight) — then if you want a flashlight just unplug it from the wall

We have one in each of our Hallways — They work great
These are similiar

https://www.amazon.com/Bluetech-Flashlight-Emergency-Preparedness-Detect...

That’s kind of what I was talking about. Fully automatic and you don’t have to hold anything.

This is a better solution regardless of your age. Infinitely safer.

SIGShooter
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zoulas wrote:
A flashlight is not an ideal solution for illumination of a space during a power outage. It’s really a “better than nothing” solution.

A few battery powered lanterns may be a better choice as they would be stationary.

You have too many things to worry about during an outage, add to it carrying around a flashlight only further complicates things.

My statement above is regardless of age.

What are you supposed to do if you have a walker, or a cane, or if you have to take medicine? A flashlight is really not ideal for a power outage.

Perhaps it depends on what we define as outage and user.

For me an outage at home just means lighting up my living room while we wait for the power to come back on, and there’s really nothing for us to worry about until it does. I’m guessing you have more things to worry about during an outage than I do?

If I needed to take medicine, or more importantly use the bathroom Shocked , and I couldn’t carry a flashlight due to needing a cane or walker, then I’d use one of my headlights. But to be honest if someone is the condition where they can’t carry a flashlight when moving around then they shouldn’t be moving around at all.

SIGShooter
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zoulas wrote:
BadTeacher wrote:
When my parents were still alive — I bought 3 plug in lights at Home Depot —- you set them on Auto ( Hall , Bedroom ,Kitchen) when the power goes off they come on automatically ( that’s the dangerous part, getting caught in the dark trying to get to a flashlight) — then if you want a flashlight just unplug it from the wall

We have one in each of our Hallways — They work great
These are similiar

https://www.amazon.com/Bluetech-Flashlight-Emergency-Preparedness-Detect...

That’s kind of what I was talking about. Fully automatic and you don’t have to hold anything.

This is a better solution regardless of your age. Infinitely safer.

I have lights like these in the hallways and living room and they are indeed good to have, especially to get to other light sources. The problem I’ve noticed is that over the years they don’t stay on as long when the power goes out, and some didn’t even come on at out. Testing them periodically is important and how often that is done by people is open to question I assume.
DOMEHAVEN
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I have not had to use a walker but definitely had to use a cane and I can assure you that walking around with a flashlight was not an impediment! I believe it was in Junior Highschool that my teacher told us to be careful using absolutes! And at 76 I would fall into that elderly class so arbitrarily assigned. Oh, and I use a 660nm red flashlight when my partner decides to turn off the lights early and I have not set up my evening meds. Both the wife and I have multiple lights available on our bedstands as well as pretty much everywhere in the house. A flashlight or headlamp is absolutely necessary during a power outage as I need to head out to the back of the barn to start the generator.

brad
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These are the lanterns I have been buying people, the diffusion is great with no eye annoyance when placed at eye level and they are easy to carry.

This is the 4 D version https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0914MWWR6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin...

This is the 3 D or 3AA version, it takes either set of batteries.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N5MBY3J/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin...

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

zoulas
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Energizer lanterns are excellent.

Mandrake50
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brad wrote:
These are the lanterns I have been buying people, the diffusion is great with no eye annoyance when placed at eye level and they are easy to carry.

This is the 4 D version https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0914MWWR6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin...

This is the 3 D or 3AA version, it takes either set of batteries.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N5MBY3J/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin...

One 2 star review complained about needing a screwdriver to change the batteries. This could be a downside. Better from the construction perspective, but maybe not very good if you are in the dark with no tools… Is this true?

MtnDon
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I don’t have a recommendation for an ideal “dummy proof” light.

Being defined as elderly does not make one incapable of handling a flashlight in a dark place. I do that every night. Some would lump me into the catchall ‘eldery’ category. At age 76 I admit to being older than many, but not incapable of negotiating safe passage from room to room, between car and garage, etc in a power outage. I know people half my age who should probably not be trusted with candles or fuel burning lights.

Physical health and mobility and dexterity would be a better criteria to use than age.

brad
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Mandrake50 wrote:

One 2 star review complained about needing a screwdriver to change the batteries. This could be a downside. Better from the construction perspective, but maybe not very good if you are in the dark with no tools… Is this true?

For the large 4D version here are two of the old style, use a quarter (or screwdriver) to unscrew for the battery replacement, the smaller one you just unscrew the base with your hand.

Surely your parents won’t be doing things in the dark, will they?

I have little AAA lights that I hang in places where I might need a little extra light, or at stations for blackouts.

For blackouts, I save the lanterns for if people are over or when doing something like cooking or repairing something, and when by myself I hang a AAA light from my neck and wear a 1-AA headlamp.

For a sustained blackout, I put rechargeable batteries in these and set them around the house, and in the morning set them in a southern window to recharge.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01ETHG0JO/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin...

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

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Another lepro option here. These hanging bulbs/lanterns are great because you can clip them just about anywhere and are simple to use. These do require AAA batteries. However in an outage, you may want to be using a primary cell lantern anyways. Your usual USB charger may not be available. 10+ hours of run time.

PN: lepro 330030-4
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083TXB5QY/ref=emc_b_5_i

xxo
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zoulas wrote:
Energizer lanterns are excellent.

my favorite energizer lantern:

- a 1000 lumen spotlight with a 3D printed diffuser.

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It’s an interesting topic for me that I hadn’t considered. Of course, not all elderly are decrepit, but my late grandmother was one of those types who refused to have caretakers, but realistically couldn’t take care of herself. She loved those giant floating Eveready dolphin lights, but would always drop them, the further she aged. Her attempts to pick lights up would eventually lead her to taking a fall a couple of times and injuring herself. She passed many years ago, and we lived in a rural area at the time and didn’t have access to or even know about motion/timer activated lanterns or lights.

brad
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TheGreenLED wrote:
Another lepro option here. These hanging bulbs/lanterns are great because you can clip them just about anywhere and are simple to use. These do require AAA batteries. However in an outage, you may want to be using a primary cell lantern anyways. Your usual USB charger may not be available. 10+ hours of run time.

PN: lepro 330030-4
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083TXB5QY/ref=emc_b_5_i

A couple of those can’t hurt, a flashlight by the bed and in the kitchen drawer and a lantern or two and a few of those lepros should cover the bases.

The simplest of all would be those lights that look like a light switch and operate like one.

Most old people can move around their house pretty well, so a simple flashlight should enable them to set up the lanterns and such as they like, for me the biggest deal of all is a headlamp to read a book by because blackouts can get boring.

Keeping the batteries and lamps in a rarely used closet with a motion sensor battery light (or one of those light switch lights) would be useful also.

Not what we have but what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance.

Kerosene
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I probably shouldn’t have mentioned elderly at all – and just posted my lantern wish list.

During a power outage, especially here in rural Australia, there are usually plenty of other things going on (trees down, flooding etc), so I was hoping to simplify the lighting situation as much as possible.
My parents are still running chainsaws and driving tractors, so they’re not quite ready for the nursing home.
They have headlamps (TH20s) and heaps of other flashlights – just not a decent lantern.

After all that, I’ll probably just get them an LT1S when they come on sale in November.
And print out a cheat sheet for the UI and stick it on the base. If they hate it, I’ll try something else and pocket the LT1S.

Anyway, thanks for the suggestions, and the animated discussion. Good to see that many of the BLF crew are 60/70+ and still fired up.
I showed my 78 year old mum this thread and she gave me the very serious I’m not elderly look.

MtnDon
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I’d have them try an LT1S or even even an LT1 with a plate affixed to the base to add stability. I like the long run tomes of 4 of the 18650 cells.

Mandrake50
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brad wrote:
Mandrake50 wrote:

One 2 star review complained about needing a screwdriver to change the batteries. This could be a downside. Better from the construction perspective, but maybe not very good if you are in the dark with no tools… Is this true?

For the large 4D version here are two of the old style, use a quarter (or screwdriver) to unscrew for the battery replacement, the smaller one you just unscrew the base with your hand.

Surely your parents won’t be doing things in the dark, will they?

It is not something that I need for MY parents. I am not the OP. But surely we all know that Murphy’s Laws will apply. Surely if the batteries can fail at night during a power failure, they will.
So a design that requires some kind of tool and manual dexterity to change batteries is not ideal for the stated purpose.

I have a couple of D cell lanterns where the entire base unscrews for battery changes. They too are a bit of a PIA. Getting those threads started against spring pressure can be a challenge.
Whether either is doable in what might be a stressful situation, is dependent on the capabilities of the person doing it, I guess.

ankur
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Hi everyone! Did anyone ever used something like this? https://a.aliexpress.com/_EIsoSmZ Seller stands for 5000-5600 mAH and 300 Lm max. Battery capacity looks real as he sent me this image of internals. I like the super simple UI and battery life, but what’s with usability? Is this bright enough to light a room? Is it comfortable to use on table during cooking, or LT1S will be better? Although I can get two of them for the price of LT1

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