Review: Quintuple LED + Handle, tailcap switch (5x XML, 1 - 4x 18650)

Quintuple LED + Handle

Reviewer's Overall Rating:

Summary:

Battery: 1 - 4 x 18650
Switch: Tailcap, Reverse clicky
Modes: 5: High, Medium, Low, strobe, SOS
Memory: Yes... Next mode.
LED Type: 5 x XM-L (Cool White)
Lens: Glass
Tailstands: Yes
Price: $56.56 Shipped
Provided by: EachBuyer


Pros:

Firm tailcap clicky.

Handle is fairly comfortable and sturdy despite its looks.

Battery tube threads are anodized and very smooth threading.

Cons:

Machining marks on the flats of the battery tube and on the bezel.

Poorly spaced modes (Low is essentially medium)

Next Mode Memory.

My sample was shipped with many little nicks both through and under the anodization.

  • Many scratches on the handle as well.

Sharp edges on both the bezel and the rim of the battery tube.

Anodization is very shiny.

Pictures:

The Quintuple LED arrived in a very solid Nage box that took some beating on the way here.

Inside is a generic charger, the usual adapter, and 4 Ultrafire "5800mAh" cells. The cells were individually wrapped and preinstalled in the flashlight when I received it.

The cells themselves.

I'm crazy enough to charge these cells. :P

Battery Initial voltage Voltage off the charger Voltage after 1 week
Cell 1 4.00 4.21 4.13
Cell 2 3.87 4.21 4.10
Cell 3 4.00 4.21 4.12
Cell 4 4.03 4.21 4.10

Quite a bit of self discharge. Typically cells coming off the i4 settle on 4.19/4.20v

I wanted to show the performance of the Ultrafire cells (Labeled as a mind-blowing 5800mAh!) so I ran several run time tests using a Convoy C8 (Stock 2.8A driver).
The results are pretty much what I expected.


A look at the first 30 minutes.


The whole run.

The Panasonic NCR18650B 3400mAh cell does quite a nice job; at 2.8A the NCRB is able to maintain regulation until the ~30 minute mark. The output slowly diminishes until the 105 minute mark when the driver’s low voltage warning kicks in.

The Ultrafire cells on the other hand…. Far different story. 3 of the Ultrafire cells drop regulation shortly after the 10 minute mark. These 3 cells last until about the 30 minute mark when the driver’s low voltage warning kicks in.
The outlier in the Ultrafire group can’t even provide 2.8A. Ultrafire #2 maxes out around 1.86A tailcap current; this particular cell is absolute garbage.

These Ultrafire cells are most definitely not cells I would buy or use (beyond some testing for review purposes).

I did charge and monitor a few cells in the generic charger. They seem to consistently charge to 4.21v and stop, but similarly not something I would buy or use especially when a nitecore i2/i4 can be obtained for under $15.

Some more pictures:

Comparison and Beamshots:


This is the mode spacing on the Quintiple LED.

High - Medium - Low

The spacing is a bit wonky. In person there is very little difference between the modes.



Some size comparisons between (From left to right) The Courui, Quintuple LED, SRK(3 LED), Quad LED Handle

Switched up the order just to keep you guessing. :D

Quad LED Handle, Quintuple LED, SRK

The following beamshots are all mouseout/mouseovers.

The Quintuple LED is the mouse out in each shot.

The distance is about 10 yards to the hanging limbs in the upper left and 50 yards to the center tree trunk.

Mouse over is a stock SRK (3 LED).

The Quintuple has a wider hotspot and a tighter spill.

Stock Quad LED Handle is the mouse over.

The Quad LED handle is modestly driven at 7 amps and puts out quite a bit more light than the Quintuple.

Conclusion:

As the Quintuple LED + Handle comes stock it is quite a disappointment. It came packaged with a generic charger and adapter just thrown in the box to rattle all about along its journey. 4 Worthless and potentially dangerous ultrafire cells were also included. The overall fit and finish is subpar with nicks both going through the ano and also under some areas of the anodization. Handle looks really bad for wear with scratches aplenty. The anodization itself feels and looks cheap. The inner edge of the battery tube is jagged and sharp enough to cut. The output is rather low. The modes are very poorly spaced and topped off with next mode memory.

The anodized threads do work well as a lockout, and the tailcap clicky is nice and firm.

The Quintuple LED + Handle barely earns a 1 out of 5.

Thanks for the review! Subscribed :bigsmile:

Thanks for the review. Did you test the charger at all? I only ask as it looks like it was part of the kit and the ones I received like that did not terminate the charge. If yours is the same it would not hurt to put it out there as part of the review. Cheers.

Nice review and photos. :slight_smile: but the Ultrafake 18650 cells rated for 5800 mah made me spurt my coffee a bit.

Looks like a little bat in the top-left tree in your beamshots.

I overlooked the charger actually. I usually throw all the el cheapo chargers in a parts box.
I will test this charger on the ultrafires after I do some more tests on them… I’ll be waiting in the bomb shelter while they charge outside. :smiley:

Apologies for the lack of update. I haven’t had much time to spare recently.

As I do not have means of directly testing battery capacity I instead ran several run time tests using a Convoy C8 (Stock 2.8A driver).
The results are pretty much what I expected.


A look at the first 30 minutes.


The whole run.

The Panasonic NCR18650B 3400mAh cell does quite a nice job; at 2.8A the NCRB is able to maintain regulation until the ~30 minute mark. The output slowly diminishes until the 105 minute mark when the driver’s low voltage warning kicks in.

The Ultrafire cells on the other hand…. Far different story. 3 of the Ultrafire cells drop regulation shortly after the 10 minute mark. These 3 cells last until about the 30 minute mark when the driver’s low voltage warning kicks in.
The outlier in the Ultrafire group can’t even provide 2.8A. Ultrafire #2 maxes out around 1.86A tailcap current; this particular cell is absolute garbage.

These Ultrafire cells are most definitely not cells I would buy or use (beyond some testing for review purposes).

I did charge and monitor a few cells in the generic charger. They seem to consistently charge to 4.21v and stop, but similarly not something I would buy or use especially when a nitecore i2/i4 can be obtained for under $15.

Thanks and yes I agree with your sentiments.