XML light Heatsink issue (video)

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KDLST
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XML light Heatsink issue (video)

Hey fellow members; i have to following question:

 

 

 

Thanks!

Edited by: KDLST on 01/24/2011 - 14:09
how2
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Kdlst your post is not right

Is working now

aurum
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Bad heatsinking ... This one is build like a big drop-in. All Drop-ins have this heatsinking issue. You can try to put some aluminum foil (?) around the reflector so that the heatsink has more contact to the body ;-)

KDLST
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Ok i just posted the link now.

 

I've been trying to embed it for almost 10 minutes now without any result :s

Isn't it just copying the embed linkt and pasting it here? Beacause it's not working...

aurum
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skulless
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aurum
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There is a lot more space in this flashlight. This trick only works with P-60 drop-ins/hosts ...

Oldienea
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aurum wrote:

Bad heatsinking ... This one is build like a big drop-in. All Drop-ins have this heatsinking issue. You can try to put some aluminum foil (?) around the reflector so that the heatsink has more contact to the body ;-)

I have a TR-1200 body tube with a 5xR2 drop-in. This drop-in has roughly the same shape and pulls 2,4 amps at the tailcap from two 18650s. It's true, it gets warm mainly on the bezel. I never used it for longer than 15 minutes on high. In doing that, it gets barely over 40°C. The XM-L on two 18650 should not get much higher than 1,5 amps at the tailcap. So I see no problem wit that. Can you check the current on yours?

aurum
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I have a TR-1200 too ... used the same trick with the aluminium foil. Works great so far.

Budgeteer
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That would be a b**** to heatsink properly. I would at least try to stuff the head with aluminum foil to help disperse the heat. It might be tricky!

Why don't they make a dual 18650 C8 XM-L? That design is decent.

kragmutt wrote:

They're gonna send you a green redcat with a black LED.

aurum
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Would be great :-) My C8 works very well ...

KDLST
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Ok thanks for the tips!

I'll try to stuff that head up with foil this evening and see what it gives when taking my dog for a walk.

 

Should i stuff it with as much foil as possible in thin layers over each other, or should i take some foil, crumble it ,and then put it like that in the head?

Don
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As much foil as possible. Wrap it tightly. Air gaps are insulators, you don't want it insulated... Ideally you want solid metal with no air gaps. Use the thickest foil you can find - the sort of heavy foil thing takeaway meals come in is better than thin cooking foil.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Tas62
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Don wrote:

Use the thickest foil you can find - the sort of heavy foil thing takeaway meals come in is better than thin cooking foil.

Around here most hardware stores sell soft aluminium flashing (0.3-0.7mm thickness). A 10m roll of this stuff would provide a lifetime of heatsinking.

http://www.lead.org.au/clp/products/TT%20Al%20Flashing.pdf

uncajesse
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even better would be foil that doesn't have a wax coating on it, like foil for food does.  the stuff Tas mentions would be great.

Piers
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uncajesse wrote:

even better would be foil that doesn't have a wax coating on it, like foil for food does.  the stuff Tas mentions would be great.

 

I guess that's another thing that's different in different parts of the world, there's no wax on the aluminium foil sold for food use in the UK.

pipopopo
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a lot of the heat will be conducted to the allu. reflector

There are a lot of smaller XM-L flashlights with the same type of heatsinking that run effortlessly

So don't worry if it does not tun angry bleu on you.

If you still worry => use allu foil, can't be bad

jekostas
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Another option besides aluminium flashing is copper tape.  Works very well, it's meant for shielding components, but it ain't cheap.

Budgeteer
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That copper tape might be outrageously expensive and possibly the adhesive might act as an insulator...

kragmutt wrote:

They're gonna send you a green redcat with a black LED.

uncajesse
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pipopopo wrote:
There are a lot of smaller XM-L flashlights with the same type of heatsinking that run effortlessly

I don't know if I would go as far as "effortlessly", since most so far are drop-ins...  http://budgetlightforum.cz.cc/node/1243

But yeah, it seems that being better attached to the reflector does help. Smile

 

Budgeteer wrote:
That copper tape might be outrageously expensive and possibly the adhesive might act as an insulator...

It would, absolutely.  For instance, it was found a while ago that just not having anodizing on threading (or whatever the contact surface is) made the lights 15 times more efficient at heat transfer to the body.  That's not a small change. Wink

skulless
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How bout applying some arctic silver in between the foil? It'll be messy but unless you change the drop-ins very often?

KDLST
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skulless wrote:

How bout applying some arctic silver in between the foil? It'll be messy but unless you change the drop-ins very often?

 

arctic silver? :d

Don
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KDLST wrote:

skulless wrote:

How bout applying some arctic silver in between the foil? It'll be messy but unless you change the drop-ins very often?

 

arctic silver? :d

 

Heatsink goo.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/#

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

uncajesse
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I would think Arctic Silver is optimized for working as a very thin layer.  But what do I know. Silly

Budgeteer
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If thats of any help... i always found arctic silver to be havily overrated. I often get from the same manufacturer the goo called ceramique which costs alot less and comes packed in a very big syringe. Being a computer technician i use that often. I still have around 60% of the syringe in 1 year of use. It was like 6-7€ which is somehow cheap for a lot of very good thermal goo. Arctic silver is also supposed to be conductive under certain conditions which i dislike but with modern processors this isn't an issue. Might be bad on GPU's if not done correctly. The majority of customers i have still use around 10x more thermal goo of what is really needed.

The more i tell them that it is used to fill the minuscle gaps between the 2 surfaces and for nothing else the more they feel adding more is probably even better. :/

kragmutt wrote:

They're gonna send you a green redcat with a black LED.