Polished S41s, H17F+, High Current, High CRI mod thread

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LightRider
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Polished S41s, H17F+, High Current, High CRI mod thread

Polished S41s, H17F+, High Current, High CRI

 

H17F+ Driver:

Hello Friends! Wow, look at me!!! I've got a treasure that has yet to be announced! It's the first of its kind and I have it in my possession. It's advanced, it's efficient, it's powerful and it's genuinely "cool". It's a Dr. Jones designed driver with thermal regulation, efficient low modes and Direct drive fet. It's the H17F+. Yes, the "+" is not a typo, it's new. It's the successor to the coveted H17F driver that some have reviewed already. Dr jones released the h17f and it has been well received by the members of the Blf community. For a while, Dr Jones was somewhat of a legend here. He is known to develop advanced user programable firmware, but for a year or so his voice was quiet around here at Blf. So when he started posting again, he showed his face in good fashion living up to his praised history at Blf. He's been gone for a while again now, but maybe when he stops by again he will show up with another announcement?

 

  

H17F+ driver. Notice the size of the upgraded FET.


I've been wanting to build a unique light that would be desireable by those that appreciate flashlights. In other words, all of you and none of those around me. Smile Yes, i know that the s41s is anything but unique, but i plan to pay attention to detail and make the light special. I plan to use the best of all my supplies and even ordered NoOxiT Red and Gold to lubricate and protect every contact point in the light. The battery contacts, driver/retaining ring contacts and the copper threads will get the Gold treatment and the stainless threads get the Red. The orings will be treated with a gun care lube that I really like. It dries to a light film and lasts a while.

The most unique and exciting feature is the use of this high powered H17F+ talked about above. As far as i know, this is the only H17F+ driver that Dr. Jones shipped out. It was a gift in response to some trouble i had with his rgbw drivers. He sent it along with an rgbw replacement to compensate for my troubles. It really was no trouble at all. It was just part of the experience as i was just getting into modding and was enjoying the problem solving.

 

 

 

 Stock light as seen on freedailydeals.com

 

S41s Polished to a Shine:

I received this light and as I pulled it from the package I know it was a special light. I mean, stainless and copper together on the same light. How could this go wrong? Well, aside from the light dropping down and shutting itself off after just 20sec on turbo. I wasn't bothered as I knew the driver was not going to stay.

It's a beautiful light to see and a solid light to hold. However, I noticed right off that I was not going to be satisfied with the finish of the copper and stainless. Don't get me wrong, the light is nice as but I saw potential for something special and inspired by the builds of CRX I began to polish the light.

 

  

This was the tailcap before filing and an image stolen from freedailydeals.com to show what the machine marks looked like before polishing.


I started by filing down the very aggressive knurling. I did this by rigging up one of my old drills. I clamped it in a vice and connected it to my dps5015 power supply. (Thanks TA) I then gutted out a mini trim paint roller and the roller plugs pushed perfectly into the battery tube. I put the end of the rod in the chuck, set the dps to 10v and let it spin.

Well my old dewalt only lasted about a minute. I'm sure it's the brushes. It had been making some good sparks on startup so I knew they were bad. Good thing I like junk as I dug up another rigid drill. The rigid did fine and spun as much as I needed without problems.

 

  

This is my crude setup using the drill, a hobby vice, and the DPS power supply.

 

It didn't take too much filing but my file was nice and sharp. Using a dull file on knurling will cause the points to fold over and you'll have a heck of a time trying to clean out the groves in the knurling. In fact, you're going to have a heck of a time filing and polishing the knurling anyway so maybe it doesn't matter. I used a file, sandpaper and a dremel to polish these groves. It was a pain but it turned out ok.

 

  

 I filed the included short tube as well as long tube purchased separately.

 
I did a lot of polishing by hand as I love the look of it. It's a different look than machine polishing and I think it adds a look of luxury. Those of you who polish knives and handguns will know what I'm talking about. I took off all machine marks and spent some good time on the tailcap. I really liked how the edges turned out smooth and rounded yet still clearly defined.

 

  

The hand polished tailcap with machine marks removed.

 

The copper was the most exciting thing to polish. I love the look of polished copper! The copper did not take nearly as much time, but it's also much easier to mess up. Fortunately it went well. I first used a number of sandpaper grits on a stick cut to fit the groves. Then using a rope with compound I was able to get them to shine. The rest of the copper was sanded, polished with compound and a microfiber cloth, then rubbed with nevrdull polish. This stuff brings out the deep colors and creates the mirror like finish. It should also protect the copper from dulling for some time.

 

  

Beautiful deep-glowing copper!

 

In the Tail:

I planned ahead and figured if this thing is going to be pulling 10+ amps, I don't want that little omten switch to melt down on me. So I opted for a bigger omten switch with 1/3 the resistance. It was a very tight fit and required some milling with the dremel to create slots for the switch contacts on both ends. I left the contact lead that is to connect to the body unshielded from the wall of the cap. This gave a direct connection as well as the connection through the switch board for as little resistance as possible.

 

 

The new switch was a tight fit! 

 

I installed a lighted tailcap using piolotdogs switch board and 6x led ring. The leds are pink because I like pink lights. However, they glow a bit towards the purple side. I chose to use about 7k resistance to keep the current very low. I hate coming to a light just to find a dead battery! And this light doesn't have tailcap lockout because of the nature of stainless steel. I did install a small switch underneath the tailcap spring. It will turn the lights off if they are not wanted. Though the drain on the battery is only 21-34uA of current. Depending on when the tailcap was last removed. This gives a glow that is very faint but enough to see where the light is in the dark.

 

 

Six pcs pink leds on pd's led ring. A small bypass switch is installed under the spring.  

 

I used some insulating material that i salvaged from my wife's burned out curling iron to insulate one of the switch contacts from the flashlight body. After cutting the groves in the tailcap, the contact could not touch the body but it was too close to put all worries to rest. So i potted the switch assembly with epoxy and wrapped it with the curling iron insulation. This way all wires and resistors are set in place with minimal possibilities of problems.

 

 

 

Thermal and electrical insulating material, potted switch, completed switch assembly, and led test.

 

In the Head:

To stick to the theme of keeping resistance low, 18awg wire was used to the leds and both springs bypassed with 20awg silicone wire. It was difficult to work with the larger wire. The LED leads barely fit below the opitcs but i somehow managed to get them to lay just right. 

  

 

Short heavy 18awg silicone wire to the leds.

 

You probably noticed that there are two different kinds of emitters. There are two cree xp-g3 5700 90+ CRI and two Nichia 219C 4500k 90+ CRI emitters that combine to make a stunningly bright and vibrant beam of light. These are the latest and greatest generation of LEDs. The XP-G3 and 219C have a very similar volts forward profile and thus they can be used in parallel. They are very efficient with a very low Vf. This will allow for a lot of power to be pulled from a single lithium ion cell. Actually, I have already measured the current draw from a rested Samsung 30Q at 4.17v. The result, 21.5amps measured at the tailcap!!! That's over 70watts! Its quite amazing actually. After measuring this, i was sure glad i dedcided to swap out the tail switch for a better one. 

Since the leds were reflowed onto the origional MCPCB, the origional optics were used. I polished it and did some filing to fine tune its fit. I found the shelves inside of the updated s41s head didn't allow the optic to reach all the way to the leds. This gave a tight beam pattern, but was significantly reducing the output of the light. So i filed down the underside of the optics edge to allow the optic to sit lower and the leds to fully enter the optic openings. The result was nice but a small variation in beam color could be seen when shining on a white wall. I used a piece of luminix 5deg diffusion film and the beam is now perfectly smooth with no color variation. This luminix film is up to 97% effitient at transmitting light so hardly any output was sacrificed to achieve this result. Using TA's output graphs, and accounting for efficiencies, I calculate the output to be between 3500 and 4000 lumens of 5000k high cri light out the front!!!

 

Heat Handling:

When I started building this light I assumed from the start that it would be a hotroded dragster. After testing and having it for a few days has shown that I was only half right. It's DEFINITELY a dragster but it's also a light that you can put out on the road with good efficiency and excellent thermal control. The PID temperature control works flawlessly. This has taken me by surprise. In fact, I assumed the temperature control wasn't working at all. INate ad the stepdowns were so subtle I couldn't tell that it was stepping down. The only way I confirmed that it was working was to put it to high, wait a couple minutes and switch it back to the highest level and observe the difference. I double checked myself a number of times because I didn't think it could work that well.

I did move the thermistor from the driver to the mcpcb. Two extra small wires needed to be squeezed up with the two 18awg leads as well. The wires were connected to the pads where the thermistor once lay. I was nervous working that close to these precious leds so i made a dam with kapton tape when i soldered each connection. It was tedious work but no leds were harmed during this exercise.

 

 

The red and blue wires in the place where the thermistor was previously soldered and the thermistor moved to the mcpcb attached with thermal adhesive. Note: here you can see the fet that was used. I have not been able to find the data sheet. I don't know if I'm reading the label correctly from this image and forgot to look it up before covering and installing into the light.    

 

I think moving the thermistor helps much, especially over the mid modes. It eliminates the premature dimming that some experience from the the 7135s heating up. I also heatsinked these regulators as well as the fet and mcu. I annealed a piece of 12awg solid core romex wire and gave it some pounding till it was flat. I cut two pieces and glued them to the chips using AS ceramic thermal adheasive. I went ahead and potted the driver using sensor safe RVT Copper mixed with alumina oxide 2000grt. Most of the time I use silicon carbide powder or a mix of the two but this time I just used the AO. Why? IDK... I also squirted in a small bit of thermal paste to help mix it all together. The 7135s on the bottom side will be heatsink by a good connection with the retaining ring.

 

 

 

The driver fully heatsinked and potted.

 

So the heat handling is pretty good considering. You can really tell when the copper is finally saturated though. Oh boy! It works out well that the heat transfer to the stainless steel body is relatively slow. So with thermal control enabled at one of the three lowest thresholds you can turn the light in turbo and let it run. The output will slowly be reduced to a very useable output. But don't touch the copper! At first I mean, while it's reducing output the copper is too hot to touch. Just glancing the back of my finger on the copper make me cringe. It started reducing output at around a munuite, I think, it's hard to tell. Then it takes a good 3-4 mins or so for the copper to be holdable again. The stainless tube can be held all the while though. This is the behavior of the highest level with a thermal control enabled to a low setting. Of course, you could increase the threshold if you like to live dangerously.

 

User Interface:

I have to say the UI is smooth and easy. I really like this double tap to turbo feature. I have the light set to four modes with hidden turbo by means of the double click. It works pretty slick and can be actived directly from off as well. And of course, there is battery check and strobe modes available as well. All this can be reconfigured by tapping 8 times to enter config mode. The brightness of each mode can be selected from a ramp of moon to turbo and saved to the mode group. Modes can be added and deleted as desired. Two separate mode groups can be programmed this way and the user can switch back and forth between the two groups. This is great for indoor vs outdoor applications or it can be used for quick access to a "Muggle" mode group with reduced max output. The H17F thread will have a link to the manual and more details about the UI.

Well, i hope you enjoined this build. It was an exciting process! This light will be listed for sale shortly. Its a hard light to put a value on. Its really kind of a "market value" light. So for now, if you are interested, send a PM with an offer. This will give me an idea of the value and if i receive an offer i think is fair, the light will go to that lucky person Smile

Note: These pictures were taken and i had forgotten to polish the front of the bezel. I was going to leave the inner part matte to reduce beam reflections but i instead decided to polish it. So it is now well polish, not as shown in these photos. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LightRider
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The shots do not do justice. I really need a camera over a cell phone. Otherwise beam shots are nearly impossible.

 

 

Beam shots to come...

 

Moon

 

Low

 

Mid

 

High

 

Turbo

CRX
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Very nicely done Thumbs Up

LightRider
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CRX wrote:
Very nicely done Thumbs Up

CRX, I am honored that you are my first poster! Smile

mattlward
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I hope that driver hits the streets, that is designed for the S41, and 219C triples and quads. I have a hard time finding drivers that will take the heat! BTW, how did you round out that tailcap, that is badly needed on that light!

Beautiful work man!

EDC rotation:
Convoy S2+, 6*7135, XM-L2 3D, 10 degree TIR, PilotDog lighted tailcap.
Convoy S2+, H17F, XM-L2 4C, lighted tailcap
Zebralight SC52w-L2
Olight S1A
Olight S1R

CRX
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Yeah, this will make an excellent light for someone, a lot of hand built work went into it with good components, great pre-thought and some nice techniques mentioned in the text, although it could do with some black on it Big Smile

MRsDNF
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What an excellent mod. Thanks for posting it up. Thumbs Up

My current and or voltage measurements are only relevent to anything that I measure.

Budget light hobby proudly sponsored by my Mastercard and unknowingly paid for by a hard working wife. 

djozz said "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

18sixfifty
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Very nicely done.

I’m a junky, I mod lights so I can sell lights so I can buy more light to mod so I can sell lights to buy more lights to mod.

LightRider
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mattlward wrote:
BTW, how did you round out that tailcap, that is badly needed on that light! Beautiful work man!

Thanks! Sandpaper is all really. I started with 320, then 600, then 1000, then 1500, then 2000, then rubbing compound, then polish. A lot of elbo grease! Wink

CRX wrote:
Yeah, this will make an excellent light for someone, a lot of hand built work went into it with good components, great pre-thought and some nice techniques mentioned in the text, although it could do with some black on it Big Smile

Ha! You are in a blackening streak aren’t you… some of your stuff looks really good with the black. I’ve been following and have some ideas. Right now I am thinking about what product I’m going to get.

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Very nice! I actually reflowed XP-L HI v3 3c for my s41s with 17D bistro a few minutes ago! I love the light even more! I have another s41s and now I wanted to use 319AT…just wanted more output and those LEDs are cheap!

electricjelly
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Very nice build. I’m a huge fan of Dr Jones drivers. His ui’s are very well thought out. You have the only h17f+ I have heard of, Im glad you build it a good home worthy of it.

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very nice
what eye for detail

LightRider
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Beam shots added in post #2

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If anyone has wondered where the sales thread is, it will be another week or two. When polishing up the optics, I must have somehow put a small gouge into one of the tir edges. It shows up as a black line when looking into the light on low. It’s not noticeable in the beam, but it’s got to be affecting the output some. So i put in an order for a new optic. I upgraded the shipping so it should only take a week or so. Then I will make a sales thread. In the mean time I will still take offers if someone is interested.

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Complications with the optjc(I ruined it) are finally ironed out. I ruined the optic during final assembly, I ordered replacement optic, wait three weeks, get the optic, my wife throws away the optic, I order another optic, wait three weeks, get the optic, optic sits on bench for a number of months, I finally reinstall the optic. Smile

I also took time to repolish the bezel. I didn’t like the way it looked so I went ahead and polished it up like I did the tailcap. Now there is no more stepped bevel to the lens. It is a nice smooth transition with no line. I’m very happy with it.

I will finally put it up for sale in the next few days. Hopefully someone else will appreciate the light enough to bring me a nice reward. Smile

This first picture was taken with flash. It really brought out the shine!

Perfect beam!

Beam with 5deg Luminit lens

The final specs for the light are:
23 AMPS! From one cell. I don’t think this has been done. And around 4000 lumens of high cri 4700k light!

If you are interested in this light, please send me a PM.
Thanks! Hope you enjoyed this build. Smile

Ronin42
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excellent work. glad your marketing your services. maybe vinn has some young whipper snaper competition Wink now.

(“It’s good that most people can’t remember their previous lives. Otherwise
things would be a lot more complicated than they already are.”
Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo)

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Could you tell some more about the diffusion lens?
In the first post you say about luminix film, in the latest about Luminit lens.
I can’t find luminix, so I guess it was a mistake.
I saw the Luminit’s website and still don’t know what do you use, there are both films and lenses, but nothing seems to much what I see here…having no access to datasheets doesn’t help.

clemence
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Agro wrote:
Could you tell some more about the diffusion lens? In the first post you say about luminix film, in the latest about Luminit lens. I can’t find luminix, so I guess it was a mistake. I saw the Luminit’s website and still don’t know what do you use, there are both films and lenses, but nothing seems to much what I see here…having no access to datasheets doesn’t help.

It’s Luminit’s LSD. The most expensive diffuser I’ve ever use. And for any given thickness they’re the best. Looks like you have to custom order it. If you’re interested, Luminit can send you a free sample consist of various diffusers in 1” x 1” size.

Data sheet: http://www.luminitco.com/downloads/data-sheets

80deg:

5deg:

Comparison on Armytek XPL-HI:

Cheers,
Clemence

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Thanks Clemence, very helpful post. Frankly, I’ve seen the datasheet page, but after being prompted for email, message etc. to download the specs I gave up.
Now I entered some thrash in there and immediately got a file.

Are those films that you need to stick to some base or complete diffusers? If the latter, what is the material? Glass or plastic? I ask because I’d like to know how hard it is to file them to shape.

It would be interesting if some commercial entity offered such diffusers for some common lens sizes. Hint hint. Wink
Though you said they are expensive. Could you share some details?

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I’m curious about the thermal regulation. Is there any chance you could get a runtime graph with something like zak.wilson’s ceilingbounce app? Basically, point the light at the phone from a distance, hit start, turn the light on at its highest level. Wait until output has been stable for a few minutes, then hit stop.

I only have one H17F driver, and it takes 8 minutes to regulate to a stable power level. However, it’s in a solid copper host which has sufficient thermal mass to handle that, and the light never gets too hot. So it’d be a lot more interesting to see results from something with more power and less capacity to deal with heat, like a S41S running at 23 amps. Smile

FWIW, here’s the result on mine: (stepped down ~350 times in ~8 minutes)

I’m mostly curious whether this is as fast as it can step down, or if it’s capable of dropping faster.

clemence
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Agro wrote:
Thanks Clemence, very helpful post. Frankly, I’ve seen the datasheet page, but after being prompted for email, message etc. to download the specs I gave up.
Now I entered some thrash in there and immediately got a file.

Are those films that you need to stick to some base or complete diffusers? If the latter, what is the material? Glass or plastic? I ask because I’d like to know how hard it is to file them to shape.

It would be interesting if some commercial entity offered such diffusers for some common lens sizes. Hint hint. Wink
Though you said they are expensive. Could you share some details?

Original conversation between me and Edward (Luminit)

“…The only angle we can offer at this size, 609.6mm x 2400mm, is our LSD 80°. It will cost $600 for one sheet.

In order to be able to place an order and send you a sample, we will need your shipping account number (UPS or FedEx)….”

“…At this size, we do not have a lower cost option. However, in volume, the price will go down. At 150 meters long, the roll is $6900….”

For flashlight application the cost per unit diffusser you get would not be too expensive. I think Pflexpro already selling similar/same stuff.
I’m telling you: this kind of holographic diffusser is awesome! Never seen anything like this before. You can order with/without A/R coated too. Luminit’s screen for projector also works like magic.

- Clemence

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The Luminit stuff sounds awesome, and I’d love to use it on a few lights… but I’m okay using cheap stuff. DC-Fix works reasonably well and it’s $16 instead of $600, for a similar quantity.

clemence
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ToyKeeper wrote:
The Luminit stuff sounds awesome, and I’d love to use it on a few lights… but I’m okay using cheap stuff. DC-Fix works reasonably well and it’s $16 instead of $600, for a similar quantity.

My project was a huge promotional light panel which requires very thin yet uniform light distribution. But even then, we decided to go with cheap MIC panel for only 1/10th Luminit’s price. A bit thicker but with more LEDs problem solved.

- Clemence

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Agro wrote:
Thanks Clemence, very helpful post. Frankly, I’ve seen the datasheet page, but after being prompted for email, message etc. to download the specs I gave up.
Now I entered some thrash in there and immediately got a file.

Are those films that you need to stick to some base or complete diffusers? If the latter, what is the material? Glass or plastic? I ask because I’d like to know how hard it is to file them to shape.

It would be interesting if some commercial entity offered such diffusers for some common lens sizes. Hint hint. Wink
Though you said they are expensive. Could you share some details?

I have 5Deg, 30deg, and 80deg in 10ml 8.5“X11” sheets. I have another 5deg in 30ml sheet. The 30ml is thick and could work as a lens in its self. The 10ml is thinner and I would use it along with another lens. It’s not sticky, though you can get sticky, so it’s held in place by the bezel. Both thicknesses can be cut with a strong pair of scissors. The 30ml can then be filed if desired. The lens I cut for this light is of the 5deg 30ml sheet.

This stuff is amazing! It really is. I have some Dc fix and that works nice though it works bynscattering the light. The luminit works by reflecting the light in a more controlled fashion. I would describe it like a bunch of holographic imigaes over lapping to form a uniform beam.

It works wonders on triple and quad lights. It can make them shine like a single led light with no artifacts or beam distortion. I put one on a triple pt18 mod to nichia’ for another member here and he was very impressed by the results.

LightRider
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ToyKeeper wrote:
I’m curious about the thermal regulation. Is there any chance you could get a runtime graph with something like zak.wilson’s ceilingbounce app? Basically, point the light at the phone from a distance, hit start, turn the light on at its highest level. Wait until output has been stable for a few minutes, then hit stop.

I only have one H17F driver, and it takes 8 minutes to regulate to a stable power level. However, it’s in a solid copper host which has sufficient thermal mass to handle that, and the light never gets too hot. So it’d be a lot more interesting to see results from something with more power and less capacity to deal with heat, like a S41S running at 23 amps. Smile

FWIW, here’s the result on mine: (stepped down ~350 times in ~8 minutes)

I’m mostly curious whether this is as fast as it can step down, or if it’s capable of dropping faster.

Hello tk, hmm, maybe I can try a runtime chart? Let me look into it. The light definitely regulates faster than 8 mins. When in turbo I think it starts to drop at the 45sec mark or so. It is very hard to notice the drop by eye as the transition is very smooth. With the thermal regulation set to aggressive, I can hold the light on turbo to the 2min mark. That was as far as I ran the light on turbo. Even with thermal regulation, I would caution whoever ends up with this light to cautiously use the turbo setting on this light. On a setting of 3/4 power or so, I did run the light for a full cycle without over heating and it kept a good output.

This driver was a gift from dr jones. It is the successor to the h15f called the h15f+. He designed it for high powered lights like triples. It has an upgraded fet, but I’m not sure what the software changes were?

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I’m also not sure if there are any software changes or if it’s just a bigger FET. Last I checked, he sets the lock bit on the attiny so the ROM can’t be read by an external device, so we can’t even compare a ROM dump to see if it changed.

The regulation is indeed very smooth, very hard to see. But it shows up nicely on a sensitive device like a lux meter or a phone, and the graph can reveal a lot about what it’s doing internally. Like, on mine, it appears to slowly step down one PWM level at a time, one channel at a time, until the temperature is no longer above the configured threshold. This makes the change almost invisible to the eye.

It works fine on my DC2. It never gets too hot. Meanwhile, even though the regulation on my D4 is much more aggressive, it still gets painfully hot during the first minute. Different host, different requirements. I’m curious how the H17F(+) performs in hosts hotter than mine. Smile

(edit: to be clear, I’m not interested in buying; I’m just preoccupied with thermal regulation lately)

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ToyKeeper wrote:

(edit: to be clear, I’m not interested in buying; I’m just preoccupied with thermal regulation lately)

Yes, I figured so;)

I can find a hundred apps for android but not even one for iOS! Paid or free, nope, nada!

Maybe I can use my computer somehow? I don’t think it has a light sensor though. If it does I doubt it is accessible by apps.

I do have a nice lux meter so I could plot out a graph myself. That doesn’t sound like a fun use of my time though… if I can’t figure it out I’ll fall back to the pencil and notebook nonetheless.

Do you know how I could plot out a graph from a list of numbers? Well I know you know how but do you know how “I” could do it. Wink

I remember doing it with excel back in the day but now I’m stuck on iOS and it has made me dumb.

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There is no obligation, I’m just curious. If it was easy it would be nice, but it sounds like it’s not, and may not be worth the effort.

Usually when I graph things I make a quick graphing script to match whatever data I have. I haven’t attempted to graph data in a spreadsheet (though I’d imagine it’s probably pretty straightforward). The hard part is recording the data, which is a pain to do manually.

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Ok. After looking through probably over 50 apps and downloading and testing 10+ I found an app that will record data by the second. It will then slow me to export a csv file of the data. Then I should be able to find an app to graph that. I have a few other this to get to first though.

I’m thinking there must be some limitation by Apple that stops apps from recording and graphing? If that’s the case, I won’t mention the name of the app publicly. IDK. It’s just weird how many android apps can do this and how NO Apple apps can. Anyway…

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It’s probably a side effect of the walled garden approach Apple uses. It greatly reduces the quantity and variety of available apps. It’s also possible that some other app already claimed the desired functionality, so other apps have to omit that in order to avoid being marked as duplicates (and thus rejected from the app store). Apple has this weird informal patent-like system going on where they try to avoid having more than one app of the same type in the store.

I’m just guessing though. It could be coincidence.

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I couldn’t leave well enough alone and decided the knurling needed more attention. So, yes, I really did file, sand, and polish all four surfaces of EVERY point in the knurling on both bodies and the tailcap! This took me hours but I am now fully satisfied with the light. The difference is hard to capture on photo, but it is night and day difference. And it feels much more gentle in the hand. In my opinion it is much more appropriate than the uncomfortable spikes it originally had. My goal was to remove all traces and marks of manufacturing. I came pretty darn close to reaching my goal. You would be surprised at how many “imperfections” one can find on an already decently finished looking light! I do not yet have photos of the finished product but I will add them as I take them.

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