brighter = less run time?

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dimeotane
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brighter = less run time?

Does anyone know if the newer bin LEDs are more energy efficient than older bin LEDS.  Or is it that they are just brighter and use the battery up faster in the end? 

I'm planning to buy some budget LED lanterns and headlamps that run a long time and are also bright.  

I'm curious about if I buy a P3 lantern or headlamp, compared to a Q or R bin headlamp if that means P3 will be both less bright and use up the 3AAA batteries faster than a Q or R bin would.

Wouldn't the dimmer LED lights just end up running longer? Or is it possible that there are some LED lights out there that produce low light and also run shorter as well?

 

jekostas
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Bins are selected based on output using the exact same input current and voltage.  Higher bins are more efficient.

SPAMBOT
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Thats the thing, higher flux bins produce more light of off the same amperage. Given than forward voltage of LEDs is fairly even, you can expect higher bins to produce more light even if they consume the same amount of power. If the available energy is the same (same Wh): a higher flux bin LED will produce more light for the same duration of time or alternatively the same amount of light for a longer duration of time.

Now with 100% all natural asbestos!

dimeotane
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Thanks guys for your responses. 

So what this means then is that a P4 lantern or head lamp could have twice the run time, when at the same brightness, amperage, batteries as a  a Luxeon 1 version?

I looked up some more info on this. I read that there have been massive improvements in efficiency since some of the older bins. According to this list on DX:  A 2005 Luxeon 1 produced 45 lumens at 350ma current.  At the same current a P4 produces double the output. 

At the same 350ma current a P4 gives 80.6-87.4 lumen, where a S4 gives 164-172 lumen.  That's again double the output!!

For people who want the max run time on a headlamp / lantern / flashlight for survival, it seems that getting the latest bin code is going to help you get the maximum run time from your batteries, and with the same amount of brightness.

 

Experts can you confirm I've got  this correct?

 

 

 


Don
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Yes. I once got 3x the output for twice as long by replacing a Luxeon 1 with an SSC LED. Most often what you get from the latest LED is more brightness for the same runtime. It's easy to put in a different LED, it isn't so easy to change the driver to one that produces the same output as the previous model. Especially when people buy on brightness..

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

Match
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For the most part, you've got it.   You also need to keep in mind that efficiency per LED changes depending on the current it's run at.  Some are more efficient the harder they're pushed, others less so.  The reason you usually don't see longer runtime with the new leds is because they're driven harder.  So for the same runtime and power you'll get more light.  I guess because brighter lights sell better than longer running lights (/shrug).

danceswithferrets
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Sounds like an infinitely variable xml headlight would be spot-on. Just need someone to make one Yell

Don
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I think one of the Spark headlamps does this. Not cheap though.

 

The numbers from my light tests are always to be found here.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0ApkFM37n_QnRdDU5MDNzOURjYllmZHI...

jekostas
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Well, if you want to monstrously overpay for an underpowered headlamp, the Surefire Saint Minimus has a rotary-dial infinitely variable output.