The SYNIOSBEAM - build log (in progress) - FIRST BEAMSHOTS!

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The SYNIOSBEAM - build log (in progress) - FIRST BEAMSHOTS!






INTRODUCTION

The SyniosBeam skybeam is a high efficiency LED-based searchlight using a new design completely different from the previous two searchlights, the LightCannon and the OptoFire. This design consists of a backwards-firing Osram Synios LED combined with an 11 inch diameter precision reflector. With the higher intensity LED, redesigned optical system, and better cooling, this light is expected to surpass 12 million candela, the intensity of the very popular Maxabeam military searchlight. Extensive research and testing has led to a design that looks very different from a typical flashlight, however the portability and battery power will still classsify this searchlight as a flashlight, potentially making this the world’s farthest throwing LED flashlight if the expected performance is achieved.



WHY A THIRD VERSION?

This is the third long-distance LED searchlight that I am building, so you may be wondering what was not good enough in the first two. Here I will explain my reasoning. First of all, a large flaw of the previous designs was found when doing some beam collimation testing. When a template was placed in front of the light with small holes in it, it became very obvious how much chromatic aberration was occurring. Not only does this make the projected spot appear ugly, but the separation of colours could also be affecting the overall intensity of the beam. With some wavelengths bending more than others, it is possible that some light is missing the hotspot altogether and being wasted. This is a natural properly of the refraction of the glass, and even though (very expensive) options exist to counteract this, such as achromatic lenses, there will always be some difference between the angle of the red and blue wavelengths exiting the flashlight. The best solution for this problem is to use mirrors instead of lenses, since reflecting light will not cause any achromatic aberrations.

Another issue with the previous two designs is that it is difficult to continue improving them by using larger lenses. The 120mm OptoLife lenses found for the OptoFire project were the largest stocked aspherical lenses I could find on the market. To increase the candela further by using larger lenses would require custom made lenses, which would cost thousands of dollars rather than the tens or hundreds of dollars that stocked lenses cost. Not only that, but as the lenses need to be made of glass and are very thick, the weight would increase exponentially with larger diameters. This means that using large diameter lenses is both financially and practically unfeasible. The third issue with the previous aspheric lens designs is that the small light collection angle from the use of a lens means only a fraction of the LED’s luminous flux gets used and output by the flashlight. Even with a light recycling Wavien collar, only about 25% of light gets collimated into the beam. This means that the overall efficiency is much lower, and the lumens projected onto the targer are very low. The final problem is again to do with the use of lenses. When a lens is manufactured, not all of the front area is properly aspherized. Lenses will have a “clear aperture” specification stating what percentage of the diameter is actually properly machined and useful. Even if the lens is 90% or 95% clear aperture, there is still optic diameter being wasted, making the head of the flashlight larger than necessary and some light will not be properly collimated into the beam. On top of that, the surface for an aspheric lens is very complex to machine due to the equation that defines its slope. This means that to get a high quality asphere that collimates light very well, expensive machines and manufacturing processes need to be used, adding to the cost. Getting a perfect asphere on a lens is near impossible.

These are most of the down sides of the previous two designs, and the main reasons why I will be using a parabolic reflector for this next prototype. Below is a detailed comparison of six different light collimation methods considered for this project. Multiple-lens assemblies were omitted because they do not increase the candela over a single lens setup, they only increase the amount of lumens collected, which would make using a Wavien collar not an option.

Other than two down sides, no option for a Wavien collar and less spot sharpness, the rear-facing LED and parabolic reflector is clearly the best option for a large-diameter searchlight. Even though the first two have gotten very high candela, there is always a way to increase the numbers. The larger optic diameter, better LED, better cooling, the use of a reflector instead of a lens, and an overall better design makes me confident that this third prototype will surpass the previous two by huge amounts.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

1) Introduction – Pg.1
2) Why a Third Version? – Pg.1
3) Real World Applications – Pg.1
4) Theoretical Intensity and Other Specifications – Pg.1
5) Parts List – Pg.1
6) Budget – Pg.1
7) Prototype Revisions – Pg.2
8) Renders – Pg.2
9) Build Process – Pg.3 – in progress
—— the reflectors
—— the waterblocks
—— waterjetting
—— electronics
—— more electronics
—— chassis
—— chassis finished
—— liquid cooling and first test
—— AR lens and outdoor beamshots
10) Initial testing (coming next week!)
11) Performance Results (coming march-2018)
12) Beamshots (coming march-2018)
13) Conclusion (coming april-2018)

Edited by: Enderman on 02/19/2018 - 22:44
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Several people have asked me what is the use of these extremely long range flashlights. While furthering scientific research and personal learning is one of my goals, there are several real-world applications where this type of technology is used.

Architectural

Sometimes high intensity lights are used at the top of buildings as an architectural art piece. This beam of light is visible from many kilometres away and draws the attention of anyone looking up at the sky. One of the most well known examples of lighting used in architecture is the Luxor hotel, which has a several billion candlepower beam of light exiting from the top.


Marine

Searchlights are very commonly seen on boats. The light helps navigate at night where rocks, islands, or a dock may not be well illuminated. Having a beam that can penetrate thick fog and humidity often found at sea is important to avoid collisions and to be seen by other ships, similar to how headlights on a car serve as an indication to other drivers about where you are.


Search and rescue

A very common use for searchlights is exactly that, search and rescue. When a person is missing or a disaster happens, first responders such as helicopters, ships, or land vehicles need to use very bright and long distance lights during the night time. Searches can last many days, and it is important for these rescue services to work around the clock, including during night or storm conditions.


Defence

Military and other defence applications also have a use for high powered searchlights. Searchlights can be used to spot enemies and reduce their visibility at the same time, or to find well hidden objects of interest during the night.


Entertainment

Many different types of lights are used in the entertainment industry, one of the most common one being a ‘moving head’ light. Most commonly used in concerts and similar types of events, these lights can project an extremely bright and straight beam of light to create many unique visual effects.


Inspection

Certain types of maintenance and inspection jobs require working late hours or during the night, and a light which can easily illuminate objects at a far distance can help see. Not only that, but using a high intensity light at a closer distance can also give a much brighter spot, which can be useful in some cases.


Monumental

Similar to architectural lighting, searchlights are often used in “light monuments” consisting of extremely long vertical beams of light. These monuments, such as this one in iceland, are used to recognize and remember past events or people, and are a beautiful display of art that doesn’t have a very high cost.


Surveillance

Another application for searchlights is surveillance, especially in large expanses of land such as farms or prisons or any other area that needs to be occasionally searched at night. The search operation can be done at a safe and convenient distance at the searchlight without having to go very far to watch something. The use of binoculars is also very beneficial in this situation.


Finally, there is the undeniable bragging rights of holding the world record for the longest distance LED searchlight.

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Several months of calculations and research were spent before beginning the physical construction of this project.
Equations for the calculations used can be found here: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/fzssy6d64s



Calculated Intensity (Mcd): 16.5
Calculated ANSI throw distance (km): 8.11
Calculated lumen output (lm): 397
Calculated spot diameter at 1km (m): 13.6
Calculated beam divergence (half angle degrees): 0.276


The flux and intensity values for the Synios LED were used from this test by a forum member: Source

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For this application, there is already another LED. It is already used by the military for lamps with a huge range. But the reference to the SLD laser disappeared. Facepalm

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You have my full attention Enderman. Smile

My current and or voltage measurements are only relevent to anything that I measure.

Budget light hobby proudly sponsored by my Mastercard and unknowingly paid for by a hard working wife. 

djozz said "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

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Finally a thread for this awesome project! I like your table comparing the different types of optics. Maybe you could also make one for different types of light sources Wink (LED, HID, car HID, short-arc HID, Laser Phosphor, Halogen).

One thing I need to mention: be psychologically prepared for having to refocus the light 10, 20 times for hours or even days before you get the Candela value which you calculated! It already proved to be very difficult with my Project Excalibur light. The way you mount your LED should allow you to easily adjust the XY-position of your LED by 1/10th of a millimeter and the re-fastening it. You will probably have even more problems than the guy who built my light because you probably can’t do it inside?

drood wrote:
It is already used by the military for lamps with a huge range. But the reference to the SLD laser disappeared.

Where is it used exactly?

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Sounds impressive, looking forward to the build and first the parts list Smile

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There are examples use here. Torches for the surveillance of the site SLDlaser removed. But they reach many kilometers … The first EDC offers” Acebeam”:http://www.acebeam.com/w10.

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Looking forward to the build, nice work Enderman! Thumbs Up

This is a very cool pic!

KB1428 “Live Life WOT”

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I agree.
Although Enderman’s light wont look anything like that with just 400 Lumens. Smile
It will be more laser like and the beam will be less visible.

I still think the Luminus CFT-90 is by far the best suited LED for this project.

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The_Driver wrote:
I still think the Luminus CFT-90 is by far the best suited LED for this project.

Couldn’t agree more.
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drood wrote:
For this application, there is already another LED. It is already used by the military for lamps with a huge range. But the reference to the SLD laser disappeared. Facepalm

I have done research which suggests a laser phosphor system could get much higher than 300cd/mm^2, but have done no real world tests yet due to the high cost of lasers as well as the danger to the eye.
In the future I will definitely be exploring that option, but it was just not something I wanted to put into this light.
The goal for this was LED only Smile
I don’t really consider the laser phosphor technology an LED.

MRsDNF wrote:
You have my full attention Enderman. Smile

Thanks Big Smile

The_Driver wrote:
Finally a thread for this awesome project! I like your table comparing the different types of optics. Maybe you could also make one for different types of light sources Wink (LED, HID, car HID, short-arc HID, Laser Phosphor, Halogen).

One thing I need to mention: be psychologically prepared for having to refocus the light 10, 20 times for hours or even days before you get the Candela value which you calculated! It already proved to be very difficult with my Project Excalibur light. The way you mount your LED should allow you to easily adjust the XY-position of your LED by 1/10th of a millimeter and the re-fastening it. You will probably have even more problems than the guy who built my light because you probably can’t do it inside?


Great idea, I will work on a comparison of different lamps.
I also have to add some stuff to the optics comparison, stuff like multi-lens is missing.

I have designed a focusing system that is very precise, some spring-loaded screws can be turned to move the entire reflector forward and backwards by fractions of a millimeter Smile
You will see in the renders I post soon.

djozz wrote:
Sounds impressive, looking forward to the build and first the parts list Smile

Thanks Smile

drood wrote:
There are examples use here. Torches for the surveillance of the site SLDlaser removed. But they reach many kilometers … The first EDC offers” Acebeam”:http://www.acebeam.com/w10.

Yeah I was surprised when I heard about that W10 getting such high lux from such small diameter.
Laser+phosphor may be the future for high intensity!

KawiBoy1428 wrote:
Looking forward to the build, nice work Enderman! Thumbs Up

This is a very cool pic!

p.


Thanks! I have’t shows any of the real work yet since I want to post all of the preliminary stuff first like parts list and renders, but I have begun working on the physical thing.

The_Driver wrote:
I agree.
Although Enderman’s light wont look anything like that with just 400 Lumens. Smile
It will be more laser like and the beam will be less visible.

I still think the Luminus CFT-90 is by far the best suited LED for this project.


Agro wrote:
Couldn’t agree more.

If I can find a compact 30-50A driver that fits in the light I will mod it with a CFT90.
Currently the only drivers I have found that can do that run on 120/240VAC.
I do agree the beam brightness will be much more impressive even if I get less throw.
Worst case scenario I will mod it with an XHP70.2 and see how it performs Smile
For now I just need to get the thing built first haha
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Enderman wrote:
If I can find a compact 30-50A driver that fits in the light I will mod it with a CFT90. Currently the only drivers I have found that can do that run on 120/240VAC. I do agree the beam brightness will be much more impressive even if I get less throw. Worst case scenario I will mod it with an XHP70.2 and see how it performs Smile For now I just need to get the thing built first haha

See here. Can be ordered here. You can choose the current (up to 40A).

Also, Lexel recently developed a 20A driver. You could ask him if it’s possible to make a 30A one or combine two of them.

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Would this light be able to shed that amount of heat? after all the led needs to be in the beam path incl. the which includes the heat sink.

Maybe a heat pipe or water cooled solution to have less stuff in the beam and shed the heat at some place not affecting the beam.

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Looking forward to the build.

A 6×6 array of XD16 dies would be perfect. ~28000 lumens and 80-100 cd/mm^2. Shocked

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BEAM SHOTS!! Party

..waiting for parts..

Still looking for 5” parabolic reflector (for recoil light)

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The_Driver wrote:

See here. Can be ordered here. You can choose the current (up to 40A).

Also, Lexel recently developed a 20A driver. You could ask him if it’s possible to make a 30A one or combine two of them.


Too large to fit inside the light, unfortunately.
I only have a few cubic inches of space due to how compact everything is inside.
When the light is finished, if there is no 30-40A driver out yet I will contact Lexel and see if he can custom build one for me.

Pöbel wrote:
Would this light be able to shed that amount of heat? after all the led needs to be in the beam path incl. the which includes the heat sink.
Maybe a heat pipe or water cooled solution to have less stuff in the beam and shed the heat at some place not affecting the beam.

You’re correct, LED cooling is very important but also hard to do when the LED is floating in front of the reflector and trying to block the least amount of light possible.
It is liquid cooled Smile
I’ll post the parts list tonight and renders tomorrow.
If I used the Synios DMLN31.SG I might have been able to get away with simply using heatpipes or directly attaching it to the aluminum, since it only uses 4W.
The higher temperature will probably reduce the candela though, even if it doesn’t overheat.
I might test it anyway though.

EasyB wrote:
Looking forward to the build.

A 6×6 array of XD16 dies would be perfect. ~28000 lumens and 80-100 cd/mm^2. Shocked


That’s not a lot of CD Sad but 28000 lumens in a spot does sound kinda cool Smile

Jerommel wrote:
BEAM SHOTS!! Party

Use your imagination Smile It isn’t even built yet! xD
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Should be interesting Thumbs Up

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Enderman wrote:

EasyB wrote:
Looking forward to the build.

A 6×6 array of XD16 dies would be perfect. ~28000 lumens and 80-100 cd/mm^2. Shocked


That’s not a lot of CD Sad but 28000 lumens in a spot does sound kinda cool Smile


Not a lot of cd, but it should be a bit more than the sliced XHP70.2.
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EasyB wrote:

Not a lot of cd, but it should be a bit more than the sliced XHP70.2.

The XHP70.2 without slicing is almost at 100cd/mm^2 though?
http://www.taschenlampen-forum.de/threads/led-test-review-cree-xlamp-xhp...
At least near the peak of its performance.

I still think the CFT90 is the best choice for throw+lumen output Smile

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Enderman wrote:
EasyB wrote:

Not a lot of cd, but it should be a bit more than the sliced XHP70.2.

The XHP70.2 without slicing is almost at 100cd/mm^2 though?
http://www.taschenlampen-forum.de/threads/led-test-review-cree-xlamp-xhp...
At least near the peak of its performance.

I still think the CFT90 is the best choice for throw+lumen output Smile

That is not taking into account the effect of the cross on throw from a reflector. The cross between the dies always takes up some area in the reflector, reducing the effective luminance. Though the XHP70.2 is better in that respect than the first generation. Texas_ace measured the sliced XHP70.2 at 6A (12V) in the BLF GT at around 65 CD/mm^2. http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1233668#comment-1233668

I agree the CFT90 is in another league of brightness and output.

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EasyB wrote:

That is not taking into account the effect of the cross on throw from a reflector. The cross between the dies always takes up some area in the reflector, reducing the effective luminance. Though the XHP70.2 is better in that respect than the first generation. Texas_ace measured the sliced XHP70.2 at 6A (12V) in the BLF GT at around 65 CD/mm^2. http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1233668#comment-1233668

I agree the CFT90 is in another league of brightness and output.


The cross doesn’t affect anything, all the light from the dies goes to every point on the reflector.
There is no “taking up part of the reflector”.
The result is simply that the lux in the center of the hotspot is not as high as the lux slightly to the side diagonally, where one of the square dies would be projected.
This is only for short distances though, far enough away the four beams from each individual die will have diverged enough that all the points in the hotspot have the same intensity.

65cd/mm^2 at 6A definitely suggests over 100cd/mm^2 at close to 20A.

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Enderman wrote:
EasyB wrote:

That is not taking into account the effect of the cross on throw from a reflector. The cross between the dies always takes up some area in the reflector, reducing the effective luminance. Though the XHP70.2 is better in that respect than the first generation. Texas_ace measured the sliced XHP70.2 at 6A (12V) in the BLF GT at around 65 CD/mm^2. http://budgetlightforum.com/comment/1233668#comment-1233668

I agree the CFT90 is in another league of brightness and output.


The cross doesn’t affect anything, all the light from the dies goes to every point on the reflector.
There is no “taking up part of the reflector”.
The result is simply that the lux in the center of the hotspot is not as high as the lux slightly to the side diagonally, where one of the square dies would be projected.
This is only for short distances though, far enough away the four beams from each individual die will have diverged enough that all the points in the hotspot have the same intensity.

65cd/mm^2 at 6A definitely suggests over 100cd/mm^2 at close to 20A.

That’s 6A in the 12V configuration.

When I look into the beam of a C8 with sliced XHP50 from 7m away there is always some area of the reflector filled with the dark cross, in the beam center and anywhere in the beam. What you say about going slightly to the diagonal makes sense, but have you observed this? In my experience with the four die LEDs it is always like I describe above.

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EasyB wrote:

That’s 6A in the 12V configuration.

When I look into the beam of a C8 with sliced XHP50 from 7m away there is always some area of the reflector filled with the dark cross, in the beam center and anywhere in the beam. What you say about going slightly to the diagonal makes sense, but have you observed this? In my experience with the four die LEDs it is always like I describe above.


Oh I see, so 12A 6v.
I haven’t tested my XHP70.2 in a reflector yet, but from the modded GT beamshots there is pretty much no cross visible.
Anyway, I’m just concerned about lux, not how visible the cross is.

Since the light will still hit the entire reflector the lux will be the same if you measure it where the die projection is.
As you can probably imagine, if you just take a single die LED and move it a bit to the side you will still get the same lux because the LED has the same surface brightness and the reflector has the same area.
It’s just that the spot with the highest lux will be slightly over to the side off centre.

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Enderman wrote:
EasyB wrote:

That’s 6A in the 12V configuration.

When I look into the beam of a C8 with sliced XHP50 from 7m away there is always some area of the reflector filled with the dark cross, in the beam center and anywhere in the beam. What you say about going slightly to the diagonal makes sense, but have you observed this? In my experience with the four die LEDs it is always like I describe above.


Oh I see, so 12A 6v.
I haven’t tested my XHP70.2 in a reflector yet, but from the modded GT beamshots there is pretty much no cross visible.
Anyway, I’m just concerned about lux, not how visible the cross is.

Since the light will still hit the entire reflector the lux will be the same if you measure it where the die projection is.
As you can probably imagine, if you just take a single die LED and move it a bit to the side you will still get the same lux because the LED has the same surface brightness and the reflector has the same area.
It’s just that the spot with the highest lux will be slightly over to the side off centre.


Well, sometimes our imaginations are wrong. Wink I’ll just let you try it out.
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PARTS LIST

The LED chosen for this flashlight is a Osram Synios P2720 KW DMLQ31.SG. This is currently the highest intensity LED known to exist, at over 315cd/mm^2 thanks to it’s extremely small die area. Even though it outputs a very low amount of lumens, about 450, intensity is what will give this searchlight the most throw. Tests of this LED can be found here: LED Test The price of one LED is $3 CAD.



The driver that will be used to power the LED is a 17mm MTN-MAXlp HP Low-Profile Buck Driver from Mountain Electronics. This driver can take 5V-18V making it perfect for the use of 3S lithium batteries. It will also be configured to output 2.5A which is about the maximum that the Synios LED can take. The driver costs $24 CAD.



The reflector is the most expensive part of this flashlight. It is made out of electroformed nickel plated in aluminum, a very large and high precision optic. There were several options for this reflector, such as 1 or 2 inch bottom hole and 11 or 13” diameter. In order to maximize the available area, the option with a 1” hole was chosen. Even though the 13” option would also increase the area, the LED only emits light in a 180 degree hemisphere so anything over the 12” mark would be unused area. A $100 USD fee could be paid to have the 13” reflector cut down to 12”, or an almost identical reflector could be purchased from Optiforms, the P76. The P76 is 12” diameter, and has an even smaller center hole at only .75”, however this reflector costs almost double what the Phoenix reflector costs, so for price/performance purposes it will not be purchased. The $100 option to cut down the Phoenix reflector will also not be taken in order to fit the reflector more easily inside the aluminum tube.

Overall, the 11” reflector will still perform extremely well and collect almost all of the light (96.5%) and the price is very reasonable compared to the competition. One reflector costs $402 CAD.



No radiators or fans will be used in the cooling of this flashlight, thanks to the aluminum body design. In order to transfer the heat efficiently from the LED in the middle of the reflector to the sides of the searchlight, liquid cooling will be used. Copper tubing will be used to transfer the heat from the fluid to the aluminum body. 25 feet of 3/16” copper tubing cost $42 CAD.



To move the fluid through the loop, a compact self-priming pump will be used. The pump has a flow rate of 1.3L/min and a pressure of 0.3MPa which should be enough for this small loop. The pump costs $16 CAD.



Flexible FKM tubing will be used to connect all the cooling components such as the LED block, pump, and copper coil. This tubing has a 1/4” outer diameter which will fit perfectly below the aluminum arms holding the LED block. A 3m length will be more than enough for this project as well as future projects. The tubing costs $31 CAD.



Small tubing barbs will be used to connect the tubing to the LED cooling block. The barbs have an outer diameter of 5mm which will fit tightly inside the tubing. The set of 10 barbs will cost $6 CAD.



The thermal compound used between the LED MCPCB and cooling block will be liquid metal. The three best options are Coolaboratory Liquid Pro, Coolaboratory Liquid Ultra, and Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut. Liquid Pro has better thermal conductivity than Liquid Ultra, however Liquid Ultra was made specifically because the Pro was very difficult to apply. Conductonaut on the other hand, has almost identical thermal conductivity as Liquid Pro, but is as easy to apply as Liquid Ultra. For this reason, Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut is the best of the three options. This liquid metal paste also has a higher thermal conductivity than most solders, and makes it much easier to assemble and replace the LED in the future. One gram of liquid metal costs $22 CAD.



To protect the reflector, a custom diameter acrylic lens will be used. The lens is 3mm thick and will be slightly below 12” in diameter. This ultra-clear AR coated acrylic has a light transmission above 97%. The custom size lens will cost $54 CAD.



The large LiPO batteries used in some of my other projects will unfortunately not fit inside this compact searchlight. In order to keep this a portable “flashlight” it will still require an internal battery. The Shockly 5500mAh 26650 cells are extremely popular for their very high capacity, more than the rated 5.5Ah, and discharge rate. Six of these batteries will be used in a 3S2P configuration for a total of $60 CAD.



To make the batteries easy to remove for replacement, shipping, or using external power, six 26650 battery holders will be used. The battery holders are sold individually, so six will cost $9 CAD.



A custom cooling block for the LED will need to be machined by CNC. The piece will be made outof solid copper for the best heat transmission. The CNC job costs $133 CAD.



The body of the searchlight will be made out of a 6061 aluminum extruded tube. A 12” outer diameter witha .25” wall will be very rigid to protect the reflector, and will allow 1/4” of space around the reflector for protection. This space will also be used for tubing and wires to pass from behind to the front of the reflector where the LED is. The tube will be custom cut to 4” long and will cost $192 CAD.



1/4” thick 6061 aluminum sheets will be used for both the bottom of the searchlight as well as the ‘arms’ that will hold the LED and cooling block. The 1ft x 2ft aluminum plate will cost $72 CAD.



A blue LED voltage display will be used to monitor the battery’s voltage, even though the LED driver also has low-voltage protection. It is always useful to know how much battery there is left, and if it is getting close to finished. The voltmeter costs $10 CAD.



A blue LED temperature display will match the voltage display and also give information about the LED’s temperature. The temperature meter costs $17 CAD.



A compact black handle will be attached to the outside of the searchlight for easy portability. This rubber handle folds flat to take up less space when being transported, such as in a backpack. The handle costs $4 CAD.



The sheets of metal will be cut using a waterjet due to the complex 2d shapes and accuracy needed. The waterjet time costs $18 CAD.



Black type 2 anodizing will be applied to all aluminum parts to clean up the look of the final product. Type 3 anodizing was considered, but since this is not a vehicle that will take a lot of wear, the deep black anodizing colour will be used instead. The type 3 hard anodizing would have left a more geen/grey look. The anodizing costs $100 CAD.

Enderman
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Location: Vancouver, Canada
Part Brand Supplier Price (CAD)
LED Osram Mouser.ca $3
LED driver Mountain Electronics Mountain Electronics $24
Reflector Phoenix Electroforms Phoenix Electroforms $448
Copper tubing Connect Amazon.ca $42
Water pump Uxcell Amazon.ca $16
Tubing Evolution Horizon Hobby $31
Tubing barbs Uxcell Amazon.ca $6
Thermal compound Thermal Grizzly Amazon.ca $22
Lens Flashlightlens.com Flashlightlens.com $54
Batteries Shockli Mountain Electronics $60
Battery holders ? FastTech $9
Copper CNCd block Metal Supermarkets Metal Supermarkets $133
Aluminum pipe MetalsDepot MetalsDepot $192
Aluminum plate Metal Supermarkets Metal Supermarkets $72
Voltage display ? Amazon.ca $10
Temperature display ? Amazon.ca $17
Handle Reliable Hardware Company Amazon.ca $4
Waterjetting N/A N/A $18
Anodizing Altech Anodizing Altech Anodizing $100
Total $1262



Some small objects such as wire, solder, connectors, and switches have been omitted. Cost of shipping and taxes were not included into the budget. USD prices were converted to CAD on the date of writing. Current prices may differ. Certain products such as the copper block machining had a discounted rate for me as a member of the university. A rough estimate of the total cost including all small components, taxes, and shipping is $2000 CAD.

MRsDNF
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Location: A light beam away from the missus in the land of Aus.

Bit lost for words. Beer

My current and or voltage measurements are only relevent to anything that I measure.

Budget light hobby proudly sponsored by my Mastercard and unknowingly paid for by a hard working wife. 

djozz said "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

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Enderman wrote:
EasyB wrote:

That’s 6A in the 12V configuration.

When I look into the beam of a C8 with sliced XHP50 from 7m away there is always some area of the reflector filled with the dark cross, in the beam center and anywhere in the beam. What you say about going slightly to the diagonal makes sense, but have you observed this? In my experience with the four die LEDs it is always like I describe above.


Oh I see, so 12A 6v.
I haven’t tested my XHP70.2 in a reflector yet, but from the modded GT beamshots there is pretty much no cross visible.
Anyway, I’m just concerned about lux, not how visible the cross is.

Since the light will still hit the entire reflector the lux will be the same if you measure it where the die projection is.
As you can probably imagine, if you just take a single die LED and move it a bit to the side you will still get the same lux because the LED has the same surface brightness and the reflector has the same area.
It’s just that the spot with the highest lux will be slightly over to the side off centre.

No, this is actually not the case. Optimizing the XY-focus of my Project Excalibur light increased the luminous intensity. I think it depends on how small the LEad is compared to the reflector.

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