Coronavirus news and personal experiences thread

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Coscar
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bushmaster wrote:
Coscar, glad to hear you keep getting better. Not that it’s any of my business but you got me curious what your “fighting weight” was before the virus hit you.

180
Thanks yall….. Beer

Im not a Pessimist …. just an Optimist with a lot of experience


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pennzy
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Are your doctors recommending the vaccine? Just wondering if you are immune now.

sb56637
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Hang in there Coscar! You’re pulling through! Thanks for the update.

Budget Light Forum ...where Frugal meets with Flashlight!

raccoon city
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I'm glad you're doing better, Coscar!

I hope you can gain some more of your weight back.

When I had a nervous breakdown decades ago I dropped down to 130 pounds.

I was just skin and bones.

Now I weigh about 175, and that is a good weight for me.  :THUMBS-UP:

Unheard
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We’re now facing the result of the second wave. About 400 deaths per day where the infections spiked in the past. Later we’ll be counting permanent health issues of the survivers.

What if we had done nothing?

Smile, you cannot kill them all.

pennzy
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The CDC says it found Corona Virus in RED Cross blood donations in early December 2019
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/3112160/american-study-f...

hank
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https://www.cdc.gov/library/covid19/120120_covidupdate.html

Quote:
Siegelman JN. Reflections of a COVID-19 long hauler JAMA. An emergency medicine physician shares his experiences with “mild” COVID lasting months that made it impossible for him to work, recognizing that many in the same situation cannot self-isolate.

EXCERPT

Quote:
I knew I had it. Now, after more than 3 months of living with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the fatigue that has kept me couch-bound, I have had ample time to reflect on what it means to be a patient, how an illness ripples through family and community, and how I will use this experience to be a better physician. Here is what I have learned.

Mild Illness Can Have Dramatic Effects

I have what is referred to as a “mild” case. I have no preexisting conditions, was never hospitalized, had minimal respiratory symptoms, and even managed to do limited office work throughout the acute illness. For this, I am grateful because I have seen first-hand how awful COVID-19 can be for others. And yet, living with this has been anything but mild. ….

hank
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What the numbers mean:

Quote:

Pfizer/BioNTech announced last month that out of more than 43,000 volunteers in their study, 170 people contracted covid-19. Of those 170, only eight people had received the real vaccine, and 162 had taken a placebo. Thus, the vaccine was estimated to be about 95 percent effective. In other words, the rate of disease was 95 percent lower among the vaccinated group than among the placebo group.

Moderna announced very similar results Monday: 196 volunteers in their study contracted covid-19, “of which 185 cases of covid-19 were observed in the placebo group, versus 11 cases” in the vaccinated group. That worked out to a vaccine efficacy of 94.1 percent. (If you’re trying to replicate the math at home, be warned that it’s more complex than simply dividing 185 by 196, but you’ll be in the general ballpark.)

These results appear to be very, very strong. By comparison, seasonal flu vaccines typically have efficacy percentages in the 60s or lower. But it’s important to remember they are merely measuring the results of controlled clinical studies. We won’t know how well the vaccines work in the real world until and unless they are approved by the government and administered to tens of millions of Americans.

https://s2.washingtonpost.com/camp-rw/?trackId=5ced5692ade4e21968ecfd82&...

kennybobby
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In the pfizer document describing their study, half were given vaccine and half placebo. In the general population for worldwide and USA (pfizer is in Belgium) you would expect to see between 181 to 935 cases across a placebo group of 22,000 people.

i hope this is real and the vaccine is effective, and not just some sort of bs marketing gimmick with the data.

Now i used to think that i was cool,
drivin' around on fossil fuel,
until i saw what i was doin',
was drivin' down the road to ruin. --JT

Rexlion
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Universities usually are bastions of free speech, free exchange of ideas, etc (even if the ideas are not entirely correct, the policy has been to allow people to have their say and let people make up their own minds). It’s interesting that Johns Hopkins engaged in censorship of the student newspaper. Apparently the university now wants to make up students’ minds for them.

== We save the planet from darkness ==

Henk4U2
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Rexlion wrote:
Universities usually are bastions of free speech, free exchange of ideas, etc (even if the ideas are not entirely correct, the policy has been to allow people to have their say and let people make up their own minds). It’s interesting that Johns Hopkins engaged in censorship of the student newspaper. Apparently the university now wants to make up students’ minds for them.

Have you never read an article that was followed by a disclaimer like:

This [explain activity] was prepared or accomplished by [insert author’s name] in his personal capacity. The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not reflect the view of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Health and Human Services, or the United States government.

Maybe Johns Hopkins wanted more assurance to avoid the (mis)conception that this was an official message from Johns Hopkins.

You are a flashaholic if you are forced to come out of the closet, to make room for more flashlights.

NorthernHarrier
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As a matter of fact, it isn’t true that private universities like Johns Hopkins have had a policy to allow people to say whatever they want to say in publications with the universities’ names on them. All universities, public and private, have a responsibility not only to allow students the freedom to say what they want, but also to protect the students from information promoted under the banner of the universities’ names that can harm the students. Freedom of speech, like all other freedoms, has never been absolute and unlimited at universities, public and private.

It isn’t clear to me who at the university caused the student newspaper to withdraw the article at issue, but it is a reasonable decision in light of the fact that the article addressed issues relating to the probability of death for those contracting a very deadly and contagious virus, the article was posted on a website with the University name on it, the article contained the purported results of research that had not been peer reviewed in the usual manner for such research, the article came to conclusions that did not appear to be supported by the information provided in the article, and the article’s conclusions differed significantly from the conclusions reached by other reliable scientific research on the same topic published by others.

All universities, public and private, also have a responsibility to students, alumni, and others with a stake in the universities’ futures to protect the universities’ reputations for scholarly and scientific integrity. It seems reasonable to conclude, given the facts above, that leaving this particular article on the website could harm the University’s reputation significantly.

Joshk
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To put it more succinctly… The right to free speech does not mean what most Americans think it means.
The constitution is only a limit on government. It’s an agreement between you and your government, nobody else. Your fellow citizens (or businesses) are totally free to delete your posts for any reason. No explanation required.

MtnDon
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Exactly. The right of free speech is much misunderstood by many.

Unheard
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It appears UK is first in approving a vaccine.

Fingers crossed.

Smile, you cannot kill them all.

raccoon city
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Unheard wrote:

It appears UK is first in approving a vaccine.

Fingers crossed.

I'm pretty sure Russia (prematurely) approved a vaccine months ago.

It was all over the news, and widely considered a bad move.

(No offense to Russia or any Russians out there.

That's just how the story was reported.)

Unheard
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Russian marketing gag. That was the beginning of a stage 3 test or something similar. Nothing bad happened.

Smile, you cannot kill them all.

raccoon city
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I found an article from October:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-russia-vaccine/russia-approves-second-covid-19-vaccine-after-preliminary-trials-idUSKBN26Z1T3

If you don't like Reuters, there are plenty of other articles available (on this subject) online.

 

EDIT:

And here's an article from August on the first vaccine:

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/russia-approves-worlds-first-coronavirus-vaccine-67810

(I don't know how reliable The Scientist is.)

Unheard
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Yes, as I said. It really was a test, else the russian citizens would have been vaccinated by now. Few days ago they started with their soldiers.

Smile, you cannot kill them all.

hank
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/cdc-quarantine-time-covid/2020/12/...
========
EXCERPT

Quote:
The 14-day quarantine recommendation from the CDC remains in effect, but the revised guidance being given to public health agencies offers two “acceptable alternative quarantine periods,” Walke said. If a community has adequate testing resources, the quarantine can end after just seven days if a person tests negative for the virus at some point in the final two days of that period. The test can be either a rapid-response antigen test or the more reliable PCR test that takes longer to process.
Henk4U2
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Unheard wrote:
Yes, as I said. It really was a test, else the russian citizens would have been vaccinated by now. Few days ago they started with their soldiers.

In Russia soldiers are what peasants are in China: abundant, interchangeable and expendable.
IMHO it’s the final test-phase of the vaccin. You might call them human gunea pigs.
Politics is priority #1. Everything else is secundary or collateral damage. Look at the Olympics.

You are a flashaholic if you are forced to come out of the closet, to make room for more flashlights.

71k5
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FYI

Evidence emerges that COVID tests are faulty. FDA and CDC admit as much

Quote:
Excerpt:

“On November 3, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released guidelines for COVID-19 rapid antigen testing, acknowledging a high likelihood of incorrect results.”

CRX
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Pfizer given protection from legal action over coronavirus vaccine by UK government.

The UK government has granted pharmaceutical giant Pfizer a legal indemnity protecting it from being sued, enabling its coronavirus vaccine to be rolled out across the country as early as next week.

The Department of Health and Social Care has confirmed the company has been given an indemnity protecting it from legal action as a result of any problems with the vaccine.

Ministers have also changed the law in recent weeks to give new protections to companies such as Pfizer, giving them immunity from being sued by patients in the event of any complications.

NHS staff providing the vaccine, as well as manufacturers of the drug, are also protected.

The vaccine will be made available to anyone over the age of 16 but will not be available to pregnant women because of the lack of data about how it could affect them and the baby. An ongoing trial is looking at this.

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine was authorised by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency on Tuesday under regulation 174 of the Human Medicine Regulations 2012 which allows an unlicensed medication to be used in an emergency such as a pandemic.

It also has the effect of granting civil immunity to Pfizer after the government changed the regulations following a short three-week consultation in September.

In a press conference with journalists on Wednesday, Ben Osborn, Pfizer’s UK managing director, refused to explain why the company needed an indemnity.

He said: “We’re not actually disclosing any of the details around any of the aspects of that agreement and specifically around the liability clauses.”

The Department of Health and Social Care confirmed an indemnity was in place for Pfizer and added that the government would be adding the coronavirus vaccine to the list of vaccinations covered by the Vaccine Damages Payments Act.

This pays out a one-off £120,000 payment to people who are permanently disabled or harmed as a result of a listed vaccination.

Not looking for comments on this, but yeah….no.

Joshk
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Not gonna lie, there is definitely a non-zero risk to taking a vaccine that was developed in a rush for a virus we know little about. I’m going to be watching the early results of the rollout carefully before rushing in for mine.

CRX
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Never thought I would like a politician Wink

how crazy is this
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Was interesting to learn of how some of the tests are so far off. However, the article cited makes conclusions that are simply not grounded in reality.

Another example of people who believe that the whole thing is a hoax. Mass graves and temporary morgues in many places yet somehow it is just faulty testing and there really isn’t a problem? The damage being done to our health care system and especially the health care workers by the spreading of such misleading information is beyond cruel.

raccoon city
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I'm not in a high-priority group, so I won't be getting a vaccine for many months.

I hope that by then we'll know which vaccines are truly safe and effective.

hank
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>lifesitenews. <=== mediabiasfactcheck

Gasp! Why, they make it sound like publishing the accuracy data is a bad thing.

The RPMs are high on this one.

Claims like this, particularly, stand out as bad journalistic spin:

Quote:
According to the FDA, the accuracy of rapid tests depends almost totally on the amount of COVID-19 in the population being tested

WTF? Of coure there are more false positive results reported when there are more tests performed. The percentage of false positives doesn’t change though the total adds up..
That has nothing to do with the accuracy, admittedly low, of the rapid test method, which is characteristic of the individual test being used, not the size of the population being tested.

*Backing slowly away from the keyboard ….. *

raccoon city
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Looks like my source I quoted is a good one:

https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/the-scientist/

I guess I should check mediabiasfactcheck before I post a link to an article.

hank
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Quote:
A growing body of evidence now suggests that some rapid tests for the coronavirus may fail in children, letting low-level infections slip by unnoticed. With some schools relying heavily on these tests to remain open safely, health experts say the findings should prompt more in-depth studies of diagnostic tools for the virus among minors.

https://messaging-custom-newsletters.nytimes.com/template/oakv2?campaign...

======= in other test-related news:
https://www.npr.org/2020/12/02/940745870/stock-sales-by-leaders-at-coron...

Quote:
an NPR investigation has uncovered another side to Co-Diagnostics’ dramatic growth during the pandemic, including potential legal concerns for company leaders, and persistent questions about its tests’ accuracy.

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