4' LED Shop Light, 3700 Lumens at Costco. NOW $20 in Massachusetts Dec 8, 2015

48 posts / 0 new
Last post
dangerous
dangerous's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 10 months ago
Joined: 06/17/2014 - 04:54
Posts: 962
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL

I hope I can get them to honor the price reduction…

BLF

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

This is a manufacturers instant rebate, not a Costco price reduction so I would expect it to be reduced at all Costcos that have them.

EDIT: Now I wish I spent more time while I had the light apart. IF all 60 LEDs in each strip ARE in series, then I don’t see an advantage in driving the strip at both ends. I am thinking the driver was split from the power supply and placed at the opposite ends for space and perhaps heat considerations.

brumpkin
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 9 months ago
Joined: 02/06/2015 - 13:27
Posts: 2

Since it looks like at least one of you have taken one apart, think it would be easy to disconnect the power cable and wire it in where my current fluorescent fixture is?

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut
brumpkin wrote:
Since it looks like at least one of you have taken one apart, think it would be easy to disconnect the power cable and wire it in where my current fluorescent fixture is?

Welcome to the forum brumkin

It would be rather easy, BUT, we are talking high voltages here and it is dangerous. Is your original fixture wired in place? Unless you really know what you are doing and are qualified, I don’t think you should attempt that.

hank
hank's picture
Offline
Last seen: 34 min 12 sec ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:52
Posts: 9494
Location: Berkeley, California
Quote:
I don’t see an advantage in driving the strip at both ends.

There’s a discussion on that question around here somewhere from a few months ago, and it gets seriously mathematical fairly fast.
I think the short answer is, it works better.

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut
hank wrote:
Quote:
I don’t see an advantage in driving the strip at both ends.

There’s a discussion on that question around here somewhere from a few months ago, and it gets seriously mathematical fairly fast.
I think the short answer is, it works better.

That’s right, it does work better in that instance. That was a case were every 3 LEDs were in series, then each set of 3 were in parallel with other sets of 3S. In that case it was better. If however, and I now wish I spent more time in the tear down, all LEDs are wired in series, there is only the 1 option of driving them at both ends.
I probably should take this light apart again and go over it more carefully.

DavidEF
DavidEF's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 days 16 hours ago
Joined: 06/05/2014 - 06:00
Posts: 7699
Location: Salisbury, North Carolina, USA
hank wrote:
Quote:
I don’t see an advantage in driving the strip at both ends.

There’s a discussion on that question around here somewhere from a few months ago, and it gets seriously mathematical fairly fast.
I think the short answer is, it works better.


I haven’t seen the other discussion, but one advantage I can guess would be that the traces can be thinner/smaller, because they don’t have to carry all the current for the 60 LED’s from one end of the strip to the other. Also, the drivers themselves can be smaller and/or lower rated since they are splitting the load.

The Cycle of Goodness: “No one prospers without rendering benefit to others”
- The YKK Philosophy

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

sacra wrote:
Normally, I’m all about LED fixtures but this strikes me as a product that’s searching for a niche. Here’s the problem: if I’m in the market for shop light fixtures, chances are I need lumens. At 3700lm, this guy is pretty weak for a dual-tube fixture.

By comparison, 4-foot T8HO tubes typically rate 3500-4000lm and T5HOs typically rate around 5000+lm (though the T5 temperature de-rating curves suggest that T8s might perform better in unheated workshops in winter…I’ve never actually tried T5s in a cold environment so I can’t say).

I think the 4-foot LED tube form-factor needs another iteration or two of development before it’s a legitimate alternative to fluorescent tubes.

That may be, but those T8HO bulbs you speak of go for about $20 each and can not be retrofitted into ordinary T8 fixtures. They need special HO fixtures and ballasts, I have some of those HO fixtures in a commercial building and they are bright, but they do not last.

This light certainly may not be able to replace them, but they may be able to replace ordinary T8 fixtures where a twin bulb fixture typically puts out around 5600 lumens – when new and everything is working correctly. And a cold start fixture costs way more than these. I truly see a huge advantage in the future for LED shop fixtures.

We shall see………….

ruffles
ruffles's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 07/09/2011 - 10:18
Posts: 1020
Location: California
dchomak wrote:
brumpkin wrote:
Since it looks like at least one of you have taken one apart, think it would be easy to disconnect the power cable and wire it in where my current fluorescent fixture is?

Welcome to the forum brumkin

It would be rather easy, BUT, we are talking high voltages here and it is dangerous. Is your original fixture wired in place? Unless you really know what you are doing and are qualified, I don’t think you should attempt that.

Caution is always a good thing. Hope I’m not stating the obvious too much, but your old fluorescent has a ballast that you’d want to bypass.


 

brumpkin
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 9 months ago
Joined: 02/06/2015 - 13:27
Posts: 2
ruffles wrote:
dchomak wrote:
brumpkin wrote:
Since it looks like at least one of you have taken one apart, think it would be easy to disconnect the power cable and wire it in where my current fluorescent fixture is?

Welcome to the forum brumkin

It would be rather easy, BUT, we are talking high voltages here and it is dangerous. Is your original fixture wired in place? Unless you really know what you are doing and are qualified, I don’t think you should attempt that.

Caution is always a good thing. Hope I’m not stating the obvious too much, but your old fluorescent has a ballast that you’d want to bypass.

Thanks guys, I just took out the old fluorescent fixture and installed an outlet that I could plug these new fixtures into.

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

Brumpkin, good for you.
Installing a flush surface mount outlet box on the ceiling and plugging the fixture into that has always been my favorite way to install consumer grade florescents. I suppose because they just don’t last that long. It sure makes it easy when it is time to hang a new fixture. Hopefully this one will last for years and years.

Firedog
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 2 months ago
Joined: 09/25/2015 - 00:54
Posts: 1
Location: United States

Feit Model 74093 (Costco item #917972) $35.99 new model.

I opened the Feit 4 foot shop light purchased a Costco Sept2015. This newer model has a pull chain on/off and much simplified design. The power supplies for each tubes are on a one pc board in the cord end plastic box. The box on the other end is empty. The power supply has only a red and a black lead to each LED strip. Each tube has a 60 LED’s arranged as 4 parallel banks of 15 LEDs wire in series. If you look carefully at the circuit board strip, you’ll see the center, series, trace is broken every 15 LEDs. A positive and negative trace runs on either side of the LEDs and is connected as necessary to give a 4P 15S configuration.

So, you can just cut off 15 or 30 or 45 LEDs and the remainder will work fine. Wife sewing bench needed a 3 foot light. I couldn’t find a 3 foot model and 2 foot models cost more than Costco’s 4 foot.
I cut off 15 LEDs and cut the tube with a drimmel. Of course, the remanding 15 LED’s could be placed somewhere else with just 2 wires.

Since it would be easy to configure various lengths and shapes, the Model 74093 would be a good cheap parts source for LED lighting projects.

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

I have seen this same fixture, first at $40 then $32.
Now in Connecticut without a subsidy it is $29.99

But yesterday, just 10 miles away in a Massachusetts store they are only $19.99, with a Massachusetts subsidy

leaftye
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 2 days ago
Joined: 07/25/2012 - 17:43
Posts: 4275
Location: San Diego, CA

Even though the current model is 4000K and the older model was 4100K, the difference seems a lot bigger. They also increased the length of the side skirts, which may be to increase lux directly beneath the light, but offers less spill. Also the current model can be daisy chained.

The low mode should be lower.

Reviews: Efan IMR18350 700mAh 10.5A, <a href="http://

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

It just so happened that yesterday when leaftye posted his update on this LED shop light, I had used that last one I had for a crawl space in our home. Need to go out and get more. Smile
Today I went to a Costco and they are $10 cheaper UNTIL 12/24/1016.
I am assuming this is a reduction available at all stores. It comes from the manufacturer. Now is the time

leaftye wrote:
Even though the current model is 4000K and the older model was 4100K, the difference seems a lot bigger.

You’re certainly right about that, the new light is a lot warmer than the previous version, but my older version says it is also 4000K
I noticed that the new light uses 42W to produce the rated 3700 Lumens whereas the older light uses only 38W for 3700 Lumen
Or so they say Big Smile


Also the lighted tubes are a bit longer on the new version. Overall length of the fixtures are about the same.

leaftye wrote:
They also increased the length of the side skirts, which may be to increase lux directly beneath the light, but offers less spill.

Yes, this comparison shot shows the difference. I don’t know if that is good or bad………….

leaftye wrote:
Also the current model can be daisy chained.

The previous picture also shows the included AC socket so that they can plug into each other, NICE!
leaftye
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 2 days ago
Joined: 07/25/2012 - 17:43
Posts: 4275
Location: San Diego, CA

They’ve made changes along the way. My older boxes also say it uses 38 watts, but they don’t daisy chain and it says it’s 4100k. It doesn’t have the chain either. I’ll try testing the lux later.

The low mode should be lower.

Reviews: Efan IMR18350 700mAh 10.5A, <a href="http://

dchomak
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 5 months ago
Joined: 03/17/2012 - 20:10
Posts: 4122
Location: Connecticut

Better and cheaper, that’s how it’s been going. Smile

Pages