Workshop and machinery mods and tips,

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KawiBoy1428
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Quill Lock.

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pinkpanda3310
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Lol, okay, quill lock. But if that was it’s intended use then that’s not what I’m using it for. Without these screws done up snug the err quill slops around and drill bits fly around in little arcs.

  

KawiBoy1428
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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
Lol, okay, quill lock. But if that was it’s intended use then that’s not what I’m using it for. Without these screws done up snug the err quill slops around and drill bits fly around in little arcs.

Guide bushings a little worn out, eh? Oil Lite or Ampco Graphite Bronze bushings? Thumbs Up Or is your quill guided by the Cast Iron Housing? Crying

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pinkpanda3310
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KawiBoy1428 wrote:
Or is your quill guided by the Cast Iron Housing? Crying

Yes. It’s a real cheap and nasty.

  

MRsDNF
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Thanks pp. got it. I dont recall seeing them before on drill presses.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

lostheplot
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This one is ripped off from Mrs dnf ,sorry Steve.
For machining parts you don’t want to damage, just machine up a thin wall split sleeve

good to use a reference point on your chuck, I use the made in china badge

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MRsDNF
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I have a dozen or so split tubes all different sizes. They keep growing as you never have the right size. Its also a good way to hold tiny parts.
Yours looks like it was made from a hydraulic cylinder rod. Thumbs Up

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

fritz15
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Knurling:
The exact outer diameter of the working piece does not matter, the profile will adjust automatically. Just make sure to drench everything in coolant or oil or whatever you use to wash the small chips away and preventing them from getting pressed into the profile. Additionally if you have a cheap china-tool like I do lot’s of oil will prevent the knurls from jamming with the axis.

Cheap lubricant/ coolant for machining:
Rapeseed oil. Does wonders if you work with copper, will prolong the live of your tools compared to dry use and isn’t as messy as real coolant.

Indexing with the lathe:
Prepare to cut threads with the same pitch as the lead screw. Let’s say your lead-screw has a pitch of 1.5mm. Then 1/6 turn of the main spindle give you 1/6 turn on the lead screw which means 0.25mm in this example. If you want to mark the position for six holes, then just make a small scratch at the work-piece with the cutting tool at 0mm, 0.25mm, 0.5mm, …, and 1.25mm. The same goes for three markings and so on. It works pretty well and can be handy for multi-emitter lights if you don’t have a rotary table.

pinkpanda3310
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fritz15 wrote:
Indexing with the lathe:
Prepare to cut threads with the same pitch as the lead screw. Let’s say your lead-screw has a pitch of 1.5mm. Then 1/6 turn of the main spindle give you 1/6 turn on the lead screw which means 0.25mm in this example. If you want to mark the position for six holes, then just make a small scratch at the work-piece with the cutting tool at 0mm, 0.25mm, 0.5mm, …, and 1.25mm. The same goes for three markings and so on. It works pretty well and can be handy for multi-emitter lights if you don’t have a rotary table.

That’s an interesting way. I’ve never heard of it.

I ordered up one of these cheapy tacho’s and stuck it to the lathe tonight. It was just a temporary thing to see it work as I haven’t decided on final placement of it. I don’t want to fix it permanently and then have to move it when I get around to making an indexing wheel at the back of the spindle. It’s powered by the 2× 18650’s in the pic. At low mid and high revs it seemed to fluctuate up to 10 rpm. I’m good with that, so long as it’s within cooee. I’m starting to get a feel for speeds and feeds on aluminium now but this tacho would have really helped when I first got the lathe.



There’s a light on the back of the sensor that flashes with every passing of the magnet

  

lostheplot
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stumbled across this on YouTube ,drilling light gauge metal

https://youtu.be/4HOxfZKIZQk

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MRsDNF
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Nice trick ltp.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

Rufusbduck
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That’s neat, I usually clamp it between wood blocks and drill through everything. Hole saws tend to wobble and the wood stabilizes the cut before the metal is reached. My drill press won’t spin nearly that slowly.

Three Tanna leaves to give him life, nine to give him movement. But what if he eats the whole bag?

Scott

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I came across this. He does a pretty rough job but it seems to work.

  

lostheplot
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thanks pp, surprised the sander didn’t burn out but.
I think i’m building one ,shooters use corn meal and other stuff on brass shells,
be worth a google, would have to be careful on aluminum

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pinkpanda3310
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Why careful on aluminium?

  

lostheplot
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I was thinking of how soft it is. but after a bit of googling it seems to hold up well. people use plastic triangles and walnut shells, stainless steel shot and lots of different media.

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LightRider
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Thanks. That gave me a few good chuckles. Smile

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found this little trick on youtube for parting off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RZRq0olsxM&feature=youtu.be

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alphazeta
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lostheplot wrote:
found this little trick on youtube for parting off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RZRq0olsxM&feature=youtu.be

wow, thx. Currently I can’t even part off w/ my mini-lathe (yeah, yeah, yeah – mostly due to lack of skill from the operator.) I’m going to try w/ this technique. I have always heard of running the lathe in reverse for some operations but it really helps to actually see it in a video.

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Interesting video ltp. Moving from a HSS blade parting off tool to a carbide tip parting tool made a big difference to my lathe in its parting off abilities..

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

pinkpanda3310
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I’m not sure which lathes but some use a thread to screw the chuck backplate onto the spindle. Using the lathe in reverse could possibly unscrew the spindle/backplate.

My sieg is a one piece design (spindle/backplate) so no issues with either direction.

MRsDNF which carbide parting tool do you use? I saw one of the cheaper ones and the carbide tip kept falling out.

  

MRsDNF
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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
MRsDNF which carbide parting tool do you use? I saw one of the cheaper ones and the carbide tip kept falling out.

I have the 20mm tool linked here.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Parting-Grooving-2mm-MGEHR-tool-holders-metal-lathe-/281604773770

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

lostheplot
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[quote=pinkpanda3310]I’m not sure which lathes but some use a thread to screw the chuck backplate onto the spindle. Using the lathe in reverse could possibly unscrew the spindle/backplate.

My sieg is a one piece design (spindle/backplate) so no issues with either direction.

I would think any lathe with a reverse switch as standard equipment would be fine,
good point for older equipment though

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MRsDNF
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My chuck is threaded to the spindle and never had a problem with it unscrewing. Saying that it never gets run real fast anyway.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

lostheplot
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MRsDNF wrote:
My chuck is threaded to the spindle and never had a problem with it unscrewing. Saying that it never gets run real fast anyway.

does it have grub screws or any locking device ?
and it has reverse direction as standard ?

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SawMaster
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pinkpanda3310 wrote:
I’m not sure which lathes but some use a thread to screw the chuck backplate onto the spindle. Using the lathe in reverse could possibly unscrew the spindle/backplate..

I was warned of this by several friends when I got my start. Not a ‘solution’ per se, but they all said that when running in reverse, keep the cross-slide and all hard parts clear with the tool and holder extended, so that if something goes wrong the tool/holder will swing clear or break instead of breaking the main parts of the machine. Made sense to me when explained thiscway but I never had that happen.

Phil

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lostheplot wrote:
MRsDNF wrote:
My chuck is threaded to the spindle and never had a problem with it unscrewing. Saying that it never gets run real fast anyway.

does it have grub screws or any locking device ?
and it has reverse direction as standard ?


No. It does up against a shoulder. Whenever l remove the chuck it taks a hard knock on the chuck key to unscrew it.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

lostheplot
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I wouldn’t be running it backwards then mrs dnf

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MRsDNF
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There is a lot of things mrsdnf should not be doing and a lot he should be doing but isn’t.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

pinkpanda3310
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I wouldn’t be too worried about DNF, he can make his machines sing. Wink

I learned on the interweb that some machinists are fine with it but others are not. Hence when something goes wrong it’s a major issue causing fear in machinists everywhere Shocked Shocked Shocked I think it’s a bit like the exploding batteries to flashlights – it doesn’t happen often but everyone hears about it when it does happen.

  

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