Please recommend a flashlight grease for dummies (ie me)

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kreisler
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weather has cleared Steve , i am coming to Sloveniaaaahhh!!

( sorry, but i took your words as invitation. hehe )

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
agedbriar
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Espresso machine turned on.

I hope you'll understand that, given the current oil shortage, only brand name flashlights qualify... Laughing

kreisler
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i am looking into it, good idea Wink

 

Fenix is brand name :

Looking now for some good oily stuff..

http://www.superkleendirect.com/greases.aspx

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
Speedsix
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Me too. Had it for years and use it on everything. Doesn't eat any O-rings that I know of. Easy to find. I got mine at a gunshop but prob find at hardware store.
trooplewis
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Please recommend a flashlight grease for dummies (ie me)

BTW, I'm pretty sure the lubricants recommended above were for the flashlight, not for the dummy. Just an FYI...

Rats, finally sold my 2010 509hp Mustang...now I can buy more lights!

Sold the red one too! Now guess what I drive, doing my penance for 500 hp commuters...

http://dreammustang.com/

http://i884.photobucket.com/albums/ac47/Ha

BetweenRides
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MixoMaxo wrote:

kreisler wrote:

basically i regret having applied silicone grease on my lights. on the Xeno, fine, who cares. there is no twisting UI. but on the Romisen (twisting zoom action) it's squeaking now. and on the Quark it was a total catastrophe (and where was MixoMaxo to hold me in the arms. baby me crying haha).

I, like others advised you about nextorch grease, now the only thing that come in my mind to make you stop crying about stupid lubes is give you a better new reason like crush your squirrel's nuts xD

yep, I would be a bad daddy >)

Ouch! Supposed to feed squirrels nuts, not crush 'em.  Laughing

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Chicago X
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In applications where it's OK to use a petroleum-based lubricant, I really like Rem Oil :

 

 

 

It's ostensibly for Remington firearms, but works great in appropriate flashlight applications.

Do not use with rubber O-rings or other rubber components, as with any other dino oil.

http://wardogsmakingithome.org/index.html

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I seem to be the only one who thinks the "stickiness" or "thickness" is actually a pro and not a con. The light scuba silicone grease I use will stay were it belongs..... on the threads. I used various lighter mineral lubes and nyogel before and hated it. They went everywhere...  battery, tailcap and my clothes... they were too thin... so I actually prefer thicker lubes because it makes fiddling around with not so well cut threads so much easier. Also silicone lube is non-toxic. I use it on everything twisties, clickies, anodized, non-anodized ... no problem at all. The slightly higher resistance is a non-issue for me. Although,  I noticed that my light scuba grease is not as solid as the nextorch stuff, it moves at very slow speeds when I move the jar.

kreisler
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thanks for sharing Vectrex!

if we all lived in the States we would probably use exclusively the Superlube stuff. 3$ for a litttle tube (1/2 oz), 5$ for a large tube (3 oz) and available from many vendors (incl free conus). the generic term for super lube is either < teflon grease > or < teflon oil >. Those lubricants are popular among cyclists (where are our cyclists@BLF when we need'em in the discussion?) and gun hobbyists, and any gun shop and bicycle shop would offer teflon-based lubes (also < teflon spray >).

Superlube seems special in many ways: The entire company is specialized on selling it (Synco Lube), the stuff is patented, and more sophisticated than the generic teflon lubes. And last but not least, it's cheaper than the competition.

Ebay asks 8-10$ for global shipping of a mini tube of 3$ Superlube (no thx!), so i am checking now a few other sensible sources..

Vectrex your stuff seems to be much better than the stiff sticky Nextorch ***p. Am just thinking that any teflon based lube must be way superior on the threads (if one wants soft and easy twisting action).

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
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@ Vectrex: I think one of the problems can be quality.  There seems to be more slop in budget lights' threads, requiring more lube, attracting more grit or leaving more lube behind.

You are likely using higher-quality torches with the thicker lube, as well as with diving lights - the thicker stuff being extra insurance against water intrusion.

I generally use the thicker stuff in joints that are less frequently used, along with those using metal/plastic threads. (e.g. Jetbeam PA40, Fenix LD40)

I like the thinner stuff (RemOil, et.al) on tailcaps, since they are more frequently removed for battery installation, and are more often wiped down (and re-lubed)

 

http://wardogsmakingithome.org/index.html

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tbenedict
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I had the silicone jelly on a Fenix L1P and a Quark at one point. The Fenix particularly didn't like it because of its fine threads. My silicone jelly came from a plumbing dept, so there may be thinner versions. It might work good on lights with sloppy threads.
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atbglenn wrote:

This is the version I use

yepyep. that's the perfect version. Item no. 21030, i.e. 3 oz. of the standard Synco product. I talked to the company and they informed me that "Super Lube" and "Superlube" are protected trade names in Germany and that's the main reason why nobody in the world is allowed to officially sell Synco's product under this name ("Super Lube") in Germany, neither thru a distributor channel, amazon or ebay unless you want to risk getting sued. There might be other reasons why most/all U.S. dealers do *not* ship the original product to Germany economically ( i am not going to pay 8 or 10$ ebay shipping costs cheapo me hehe). I found a German dealer who sells the liquid form of Synco's Super Lube, namely the Super Lube Precision Oiler (renamed to "Synco Lube Oiler"):

That dealer might be able to offer "Synco Lube Grease" in future but that might take a while. So for the mean time i've ordered the Synco Lube Oil and will test it for you, me, us. Typically watchmakers and camera fetishists use Superlube Oil .. for minimum friction in rotating fine machine parts (watches, clocks).

I am just looking for minimal drag in my twisties (Romisen zoom, Quark tactical UI, AAA keychain lights), especially on bare aluminium threads.

I will keep you posted if kreisler recommends the stuff or not. be my word the last on the topic "synco's super lube oiler". where's your trust, where's my credit? i am doing it as BFL service Wink

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
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Kreisler:

If you have any stores (ConUS would be Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, Gander Mountain, etc.) locally that cater to fishermen, you might try fishing reel grease or fishing reel oil. Ardent is one brand I've thought of trying, but I'm testing out bicycle chain oil right now.

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Thanks for the tip. However I'll do no more testing (experimenting) other than the just ordered superlube oil. In fact, the Synco company's engineer recommended suberlube grease over the suberlube oil when i asked him which one would better suit my needs (non-anodized aluminum threads, twist UI). but let kreisler have the final word on this topic "superlube grease vs. superlube oil". My total was €6.89 (=9.xxUS$) for the oil (and it should be better than silicone oil because mine contains teflon), and i already wasted much time on the Nextorch ****, so i'll be fed up with the lubing topic if the oil turns out to be a disappointment.

If it does, i'll try to sell it here (krrrhh).

And go back to the dry state: no lubes, nothing. bone dry.

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
agedbriar
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I have a tube of grease and some kind of "dry lubricant" with teflon added in my hobby workshop. Both seem highly regarded by cyclists.

I never tried them on flashlights, wondering if, with time, the teflon deposit (if real) might impair the electrical connection.

BetweenRides
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agedbriar wrote:

I have a tube of grease and some kind of "dry lubricant" with teflon added in my hobby workshop. Both seem highly regarded by cyclists.

I never tried them on flashlights, wondering if, with time, the teflon deposit (if real) might impair the electrical connection.

agedbriar - is the dry lube by chance 'White Lightning'?

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agedbriar wrote:
with teflon added in my hobby workshop.

i am almost(?) sure that my dad's got similar stuff in his garage or workshop but i guess i prefer to import my own mini original tube Made in USA and keep it neatly in my personal drawer. and i am not interested in any further experiments. Any synthetic lube with added teflon will do the trick i am sure, be it cyclist's lube, fishing's lube or gun oil. They are also more expensive than Superlube. Superlube is brand name stuff and yet the cheapest of all teflon-based lubes.

Cant wait to test the Synco oil..

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
agedbriar
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BetweenRides wrote:

agedbriar wrote:

I have a tube of grease and some kind of "dry lubricant" with teflon added in my hobby workshop. Both seem highly regarded by cyclists.

I never tried them on flashlights, wondering if, with time, the teflon deposit (if real) might impair the electrical connection.

agedbriar - is the dry lube by chance 'White Lightning'?

No, it's this:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=5963

Looks and feels like milk when applied. You have to let it dry before using the lubricated parts, which then get a thin coating of lubricant that indeed doesn't attract dust as much as common grease. Not quite "dry", though, something between grease and wax, I'd say.

kreisler
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weldtite TF2 looks perfect! ( and priced higher than superlube )

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I took a look at the Weldtite TF2 you linked to, appears to be similar to White Lightning. I am not a fan of this for bike chains, prefer wet oil based lubes, but some cyclists in dry climates prefer it. My only caution on using it in flashlights is once the milk dries, it has a tendency to flake off - so it could work it's way into other parts. I'd test it on a cheapo flashlight (sparingly) and see if it works for you.

agedbriar
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kreisler wrote:

weldtite TF2 looks perfect! ( and priced higher than superlube )

Well, for flashlights I wouldn't recommend it.

For one, it would be messy with flashlights. It's very thin (runny), with the dispenser orifice much too large for that (lack of) viscosity. You have to be very careful not to get it all over the place. Then there is the wait to dry. Then there is the potential teflon buildup...

I use it to advantage on machine guide rails. Have still to try it on feeding tables, like the planer's.

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agedbriar wrote:
Well, for flashlights I wouldn't recommend it.

oops Blushing

 

sometimes i am plain wrong

sorry!

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
agedbriar
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BetweenRides wrote:

... it has a tendency to flake off ...

It would seem that yours dries up to a much "dryer" state than mine.

I still get a slightly greasy trace on my finger if I run it over the surface that has been lubed months ago (but not used much since). 

Trancersteve
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Anyone here have any experience with this?

http://www.maplin.co.uk/contralube-770-connector-lubricant-346030

I saw a single reference to it on CPF with supposedly good results, would be nice to hear from others before I purchase. It's quite expensive for what it is!

I wear my sunglasses at night.

agedbriar
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Trancersteve wrote:

Anyone here have any experience with this?

http://www.maplin.co.uk/contralube-770-connector-lubricant-346030

I saw a single reference to it on CPF with supposedly good results, would be nice to hear from others before I purchase. It's quite expensive for what it is!

Quote:

"This product is available to over 18s only"

Laughing

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Well it is lube..... Wink

I wear my sunglasses at night.

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agedbriar wrote:

Trancersteve wrote:

Anyone here have any experience with this?

http://www.maplin.co.uk/contralube-770-connector-lubricant-346030

I saw a single reference to it on CPF with supposedly good results, would be nice to hear from others before I purchase. It's quite expensive for what it is!

Quote:

"This product is available to over 18s only"

Laughing

I guess it depend on what kind of 'connection' you need lubed..... Sealed

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kreisler wrote:

kreisler wrote:

got my "3$"-lube (i paid 6.89€, or 9.14$, for it) today. havent tested it yet. didnt come with a blister packaging. the stuff looks good so far. it does NOT look like oil but like liquified (silicone) grease. very viscous (viscid) and reminds of typical liquid glue. the transparent tube-like container is not hard plastic but soft plastic: squeeze it to control the oiler's output.

the oiler comes with 2 caps (yellow tip, and transparent cap) and a pocket clip. the pocket clip is rather cool -- it fits my AAA lights (in picture: Klarus MiX6), and it is branded with "SYNCO" (difficult to see in the picture which is a PC scan hehe) which looks nice too.

I am very glad that the oil doesnt have the physical consistency of oily oil (from your kitchen) but flows very slowly and "thick" .. like liquid glue.

Will test and evaluate the lube later.

If this product doesnt do it for me, then i'll give up. I have spent enough time, energy, efforts, and money on this topic. No further money invested in lubing products, no thanks! And all that §$%&! mostly because i was/am not willing to pay 8-10$ shipping for a mini tube of Superlube Grease (which is highly recommended on cpf as one of the best lubes for flashlights, threads and o-rings, made of any material).

 

yeah, sometimes i regret having gone the cheap route. budgee me. tss.

i have finally applied the superlube OIL on all of my 10(?) flashlights and i've come to the conclusion: this is the exact kind of lube that i was looking for, it works perfectly well and it gets the kreisler's shilly two thumbs recommendation:

kreisler's Overall Rating: ★★★★★

it works really well on:

+ o-rings (silicone, rubber, i dont know, i mean who cares, wtf)

+ anodized aluminum threads (e.g. Tank E09, Lumintop Worm)

+ non-anodized, bare §$%&! aluminum threads (e.g. Quark X AA)

+ twist zoomies (e.g. Romisen RC-29, Romisen RC-29a)

+ stainless steel threads (e.g. Lumintop Worm SS)

 

it does not exhibit stellar performance on:

+ Titanium threads (e.g. iTP A3 Titanium)

 

In all above cases, the stuff works much much much better than the Nextorch Silicone Grease C*ap. What else can i ? Since it's liquid, it easily flows into all grooves and slots with little external movement (e.g. twisting action). For example there is no need to lift or remove the o-rings; the oil would get there anyway. And now i am seriously wondering en quoi the superlube GREASE is superior for our application on flashlights. Maybe the grease is superior maybe it isnt, i dont know. I only have the OIL, and it does a fantastic lubing job: it effectively reduces the friction (drag/resistance) on the o-rings, makes the o-rings wet and "juicy", and also reduces friction in the threads, for two reasons: because it is non-sticky oil/liquid and because it contains teflon particles.

As mentioned earlier, the superlube oil is typically applied in fine rotating machinery, such as watches, clocks, and photo cameras. And since grease isnt commonly regarded as "liquid", i would assume that greased machinery parts produce more friction than fine oiled ones.

The only fear with OIL is/was: Isnt it too liquid, too messy and doesnt it run away?

My answer is: Yes, it is liquid (and viscous like liquid glue) but it doesnt run away. And no, it's not messy at all. ( *real oil* like the edible oils from your kitchen, *those* are messy stuff. surprisingly the superlube "oil" has not very much in common with what you would expect from a substance called "oil". not messy, not sticky. and easily cleaned/wiped away with kleenex )

I am not going to look any further. I know that there are even better flashlight lubes than superlube grease and superlube oil.. but i am satisfied already: reduced friction in the threads and on the o-rings!

Merely the performance on Ti-Ti threads (and SS-SS threads?) is questionable. My iTP A3 Titanium squeaks as if the threads were bone-dry: While it's better than bone-dry or the horrible Nextorch silicone grease, i am sure that there exists much better performing lube on Ti-Ti threads. Just a matter of price. As always. Because the more pricey option would be Nano-Oil, for US$ 16.00 shipped:

 

Also note that ChibiM has a relevant thread too:

Lubricant for flashlight threads

*FMI* i got 4 i/o sh
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Glad you finally found your magic lube, kreisler. Smile

I have noticed that on certain lights the unanodized threads turn grey with in a short time no matter what I use - heavy viscosity chain oil or SuperLube grease. I think it is the ones with cheaper grade aluminum. On some I am curious about your experience with this phenomenon is with all your different lights. Can you watch and report back in a few days?

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