Just off the CNC - Update: It's Alve!

209 posts / 0 new
Last post
PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Flashlight Foy wrote:

Many Drys (including mine) have a 20 second step-down UI.  20 seconds in "turbo" mode and it steps down to high and you're right; Match did a chart that shows the gains above 3.5 amps are small/don't justify the heat/emitter abuse.  But, with 3 x 18650 the Dry does indeed feed each emitter with that much current.

Since there's no free lunch when dealing with extreme output, I guess that's why I'm so impressed with how you've addressed the necessary trade-offs.

 

amazingFoy

That makes more sense.. 20 seconds worth of 'turbo' mode can be dealt with thermally.  Much beyond that, you'd be carrying a small toaster that happens to output a bit of light Smile

As for addressing the trade offs, well, I realized many years ago that life is a compromise.  Engineering a light such as this is no different - a set of compromises that work well together.  Hopefully I have chosen well, and none of the variables turn out to be different than expected - but only time and 240 watts of input power will prove that Smile

The other cool thing about the driver I worked up - it will take from 10V to 120V input.  When I'm testing, I can run the thing from a 100V DC Power supply, and it will only draw roughly 2.4 amps - this way, I can test and debug without having to use massive input wires.. 18ga will be fine.  Once in the vehicle, I'll be using 6ga to lessen the voltage drop.  I designed the driver to have the highest efficiency at about 14V - typical of vehicle with the alternator turning..  At 100V, it will make a little more heat, but we're talking about a watt or two - nothing substantial compared to heat from the emitters.

Thanks so much for your kind words - I just might have to send you one of these to 'review' Smile

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

LOL

Oh yeah . . . would look killer on the front of my Passat.

And, as for the SST-90s . . . a big die that needs a lot of juice to perform and I doubt there would be any noticeable increase in brightness.  I also agree that there would be little if any advantage using a few XP-Gs, other than less light.  Once it's up and running, I predict you won't be saying, "I wish they threw better."  There's going to be some reach for sure but I suspect aiming won't be an issue.  It will basically be this insane horizontal of lightning from a distance and since it's flat, it might illuminate the shoulders of the road pretty well.

Actually, the more I consider aiming, the less sure I am about what you'll see from behind the wheel.  I'm a novice so, this is probably all redundant to you.  As is everything on the base being able to withstand over 170 degrees F sustained.  Is that about right?  A little high, perhaps?

Sorry - just can't seem to stop thinking about this . . . pretty damn awesome.

 

Foy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Flashlight Foy wrote:

LOL

Oh yeah . . . would look killer on the front of my Passat.

And, as for the SST-90s . . . a big die that needs a lot of juice to perform and I doubt there would be any noticeable increase in brightness.  I also agree that there would be little if any advantage using a few XP-Gs, other than less light.  Once it's up and running, I predict you won't be saying, "I wish they threw better."  There's going to be some reach for sure but I suspect aiming won't be an issue.  It will basically be this insane horizontal of lightning from a distance and since it's flat, it might illuminate the shoulders of the road pretty well.

Actually, the more I consider aiming, the less sure I am about what you'll see from behind the wheel.  I'm a novice so, this is probably all redundant to you.  As is everything on the base being able to withstand over 170 degrees F sustained.  Is that about right?  A little high, perhaps?

Sorry - just can't seem to stop thinking about this . . . pretty damn awesome.

 

Foy

 

I felt the same way about the XP-G's - that's why I decided to kill them off.  The might add a little throw, but it will be completely insignificant when placed inside the wall of light that should come out of this thing.  SST-90's certainly DO put out a little more light, but they do it with (as you say) a bigger die, yielding much more spill and much less throw.  They're also quite a bit less efficient (twice the output with 3x the input)

The beam pattern is not going to be horizontal, it will still be a circular output.  The width of the enclosure is only 15 inches, essentially nothing once you get out more than a few feet from the light.

Every single component that I've selected (metals, plastics, electrical parts) is capable of sustained operation at 125C (257F).  Even the PCB is built using upgraded material (FR4-TG170 instead of regular FR-4).  My cut-off will be 100C, which is where the light will automatically start backing off to prevent damage - but this is a very cautious number.  125C really is no problem at all for the parts.  Even 100C should never be seen though - the thermal analysis suggests that absolute max will be around 80C, and that's in a VERY hot 90F ambient environment with almost no airflow.

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

15-inches.  I guess I need to read a little closer.  I had it bigger in my mind for some reason.  For the light you're going to get, that's pretty small.  Actually kinda funny when you think of how big some Cibies are.

Anyway, looking forward to seeing it . . .

 

thanksforsharingFoy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

Burro
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 6 months ago
Joined: 01/28/2012 - 00:40
Posts: 201
Location: Or

PilotPTK wrote:

Burro wrote:

Absolutely brilliant project, looking forward tot his perhaps becoming available as a kit. 

What I might consider is selling the circuit board with all the parts already on it as part of a 'kit'.. The only problem with that is that the unit is 90% built at that point.. kind of defeats the purpose of the word 'kit'..  Still pondering..

 

PPtk

 

All understood still very keen, can't wait to see your finished product.

 

People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid.
 
PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Smile First signs of life.  I had a little spare time tonight, so I started putting components on the circuit board and doing some basic testing.  So far, all good news.  The op-amp based current sense circuit works perfectly - I'm only using a 0.01 OHM Current Sense resistor (to mitigate power loss in the sense circuit), and the 50 to 1 op-amp works beautifully.  At 3 amps, I'm seeing 1.5143V out of the sense circuit - well within the 1% component tolerances - and it's stable and quiet.

The DSP is soldered down - always fun soldering a fine pitch QFN by hand with an iron.  3 XM-L's are in place, and the first lumens have been emitted.  I ran it up to 3 Amps for just long enough to measure the current sense output, but with the paper-thin circuit board not being attached to a heat-sink of any kind, it gets HOT in a hurry.  1.5 amps is about the most I can run for more than 5 seconds without risking damage.

All in all though - a successful beginning.

Pictures of the process:

This is the 64 pin QFN part drowning in water soluble flux.  The tip of the soldering iron is in the picture for size comparison.  3 XM-L U2 Parts are also visible.  Those are a real pain to solder by hand - the only real way to do it is with two irons.  They look good though - nice and centered.  At the far right of the picture, you can also catch a glimpse of the 50:1 Op-Amp.  I love these TI parts - very stable, and very tiny.

QFN Size 

 

Side view of the pads of the QFN.  Soldered up nicely, considering it was done by hand rather than reflow.  You can also see a few 0603 caps and one 0805 cap.
QFN Side 

 

A picture of the emitters through the TIR optic.  These Cute-3-XML optics from LEDIL are very well made, I have to say.
You can see how perfectly centered the emitters are in the optic though.
emitters in optic 

 

The emitters lighting up for the first time.  This is insanely low current - 0.001 Amps (1 milliamp).
Emitters firing 

 

Emitters fired at 50mA with TIR Optic in place.
Fired with optic 

 

Emitters at 1.5 Amp With TIR Optic Smile
1.5A Emitters 

 

Overall, I'm very satisfied with the results thus far.  The THIN (0.3mm) circuit board was a good move - it allows heat to move from the emitters to the back side of the board (and into the enclosure) through the vias with incredible efficiency.  There is no doubt that a THIN board like this with heavy copper and LOTS of via's will perform better than an aluminum star board.  At 1.5 Amps, Its less than a second before the back side of the board is WARM - which is good - it means the heat is moving away from the emitters rather than staying trapped in them.

More tomorrow, I hope.

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Burro
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 6 months ago
Joined: 01/28/2012 - 00:40
Posts: 201
Location: Or

Looking brilliant Smile

 

People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid.
 
torelu
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 09/06/2011 - 08:07
Posts: 73
Location: Romania

Some of us might be interested (at least I am) to just buy the circuit board and stuff without the parts installed. You should take this also in consideration. The buyer will install the parts at his own risk. Less work for you, more satisfaction for the others.

Very nice project indeed.

Maybe a smaller light (bike light) for the future ? Smile

Essexman
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 23 hours ago
Joined: 01/30/2011 - 18:18
Posts: 714
Location: UK

Great build along, thanks for taking the time to share it with us.

viktori
viktori's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 years 5 months ago
Joined: 12/25/2011 - 02:41
Posts: 713
Location: Croatia

This looks excellent. Surprised

 

If I can offer an idea for the future ... perhaps make the circuit board modular? 1 module for 3 XM-Ls? That way anyone can order 3, break 1 at their first try at soldering, and later  use 2 for total of 6 XM-Ls. Or similar.

You get the picture.

 

Viktor

This is my flashlight collection.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

That's one thing I've enjoyed learning since I began this "flashlight thing" the need for a thermal pathway and the different ways to route heat away from the emitter/board or whatever.  Nothing to absorb/move heat = very bad.

Again, I apologize if you've already answered this but am I right assuming the part of the TIR next to the emitter does not actually touch the emitter?  Is it dished out a little or flat and mounted held away or . . . . does it touch?

I find myself wishing the TIRs were larger in diameter and maybe a little deeper . . . . so, I guess I have to ask; how big are the TIRs?  Not a huge deal - just curious.

 

Foy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

The need for a thermal pathway is so often either misunderstood, overlooked, or written off as too difficult.  Without an excellent thermal pathway, you could have a heat-sink the size of an aircraft carrier and it will not matter - if you can't get the heat from your source to your sink, then your sink is irrelevant anyway.

The TIR's that I'm using are 35mm in diameter (for 3 emitters) and about 15mm high.  bigger ones are available though!  The Iris comes to mind ( http://www.ledil.com/node/2/p/2651 ) at 38mm in diameter and 28mm tall for a single XM-L.
Iris 

The Khatod PL353CTL is also a big optic at 50mm in Diameter and 22mm in height for 3 XM-L's ( http://www.khatod.com/cms/pl353ctl_series___triple_lenses_for_cree_xlamp_xm_l_leds-2705099-2705099.html# )
Khatod TIR 

TIR Optics are also different animals than reflectors.  While bigger is still 'better' for the beam, it's less pronounced with optics than it is with reflectors.  If the design is good, an optic shouldn't 'need' to be huge to produce a very nice beam profile.

The optics that I'm using (CUTE-3-XML) are hollowed out over the emitter - they don't 'touch' - but they're very close.  I would be hard pressed to say that there's a full millimeter between the lens of the XM-L and the TIR optic itself.  Even this small gap, however, helps to keep the heat from the emitter from dissipating into the lens rather than the circuit board.

 

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Chicago X
Chicago X's picture
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 7 months ago
Joined: 07/22/2011 - 16:13
Posts: 4013
Location: See Name

Have you seen any MPCBs suitable for the 50mm Khatod?

That optic looks like a killer piece for retrofitting triples. 

FWIW, the 3-up CUTE optic is what I used on my last triple conversion.  Very efficient and thermally stable. 

http://wardogsmakingithome.org/index.html

War Dogs, Making it Home - Rescue Dogs for Returning Vets

pounder
pounder's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 11 months ago
Joined: 01/20/2011 - 16:43
Posts: 1788
Location: Ontario

man i'd love to install one of these on my scooter lol..seriously! would have doubts about supplying it with enough power though..

joanne
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 2 months ago
Joined: 01/22/2012 - 22:48
Posts: 12
Location: Las Vegas, NV

What an amazing thread!! It's really interesting to see the engineering thought process behind the design of the light. I wanted to go into mechanical engineering when I was I was in college, but my math just wasn't good enough. I ended up in IT doing business software instead. (once a nerd, always a nerd).

It will be interesting to see the beam pattern once you get it all together and running at full throttle. Although your design isn't conducive to a curved light to create a wide beam, having a set of emitters at each end of the light set outwards at 20 to 30 degrees might provide more peripheral light. Sort of like a built-in cornering lights. (Please understand that I am NOT arm-chair quarterbacking! Just thinking out loud.)

Can't wait to see the pictures of it in action on your Jeep. Aren't you concerned that the light beam will catch bushes or trees on fire as you drive past? Wink

Thanks so much for taking the time to share this process with all of us!

Joanne

JonnyC
JonnyC's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 01/14/2011 - 19:12
Posts: 1148
Location: Green Bay, WI - USA

This thread makes me wish I went into electrical and/or mechanical engineering. For now I'm stuck flashing C programs onto assembled microcontroller boards using code developed by someone else, then wiring them into a heatsink developed by someone on the CNC and installing it into a Maglite.  Makes my "modding" seem so very modest.

I can see a lot of off-road guys wanting a product like this, depending on the price.  You should send one in to Xtreme 4X4 on the Power Block Smile

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Chicago X wrote:

Have you seen any MPCBs suitable for the 50mm Khatod?

That optic looks like a killer piece for retrofitting triples. 

FWIW, the 3-up CUTE optic is what I used on my last triple conversion.  Very efficient and thermally stable. 

I haven't seen any, but they're easy enough to make.  MPCB's are somewhat of a sham anyway - they conduct heat less well than a thin circuit board with heavy copper and lots of via's.

Further, I've not even seen the 50mm Khatod optics for sale anywhere.  You might be able to buy them right from Khatod, but I can't be sure about that.  Some companies refuse to sell direct - only handling sales through distributors..

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

pounder wrote:

man i'd love to install one of these on my scooter lol..seriously! would have doubts about supplying it with enough power though..

At full blast, assuming your scooter has a 12V electrical system, you'd need to supply this with about 21 Amps of current.  I kind of doubt the average scooter has an alternator that could keep up with that - but I'm not at all sure.

There is, however, no reason you couldn't run something like this at less-than-full-blast to fit its output to the available power.  Even at 50% brightness, which would only require about 11 Amps, you're talking about 12,000 Lumens at the emitter, and over 10,000 out the front (after Optics Loss and Protective Lens Loss).  A 55 watt halogen head-light need 4.5 Amps, so 11 Amps is not a crazy number, I would assume.

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

joanne wrote:

What an amazing thread!! It's really interesting to see the engineering thought process behind the design of the light. I wanted to go into mechanical engineering when I was I was in college, but my math just wasn't good enough. I ended up in IT doing business software instead. (once a nerd, always a nerd).

Hehe - Yeah, there's been more engineering thought put into this little hobby project than there is in a lot of commercial products on store shelves.  I may have gone a little overkill Smile  I hear you on the nerd thing - I dabble in Database Administration here and there..

 

joanne wrote:

It will be interesting to see the beam pattern once you get it all together and running at full throttle. Although your design isn't conducive to a curved light to create a wide beam, having a set of emitters at each end of the light set outwards at 20 to 30 degrees might provide more peripheral light. Sort of like a built-in cornering lights. (Please understand that I am NOT arm-chair quarterbacking! Just thinking out loud.)

I had actually considered having the outside groups of LED's pointed 30 degrees out to do just what you suggest.  There are two difficulties with this plan though..

1) The front protective lens is currently very easy to make.  It's flat.  Having to wrap that lens around a corner means either bending plastic, injecting plastic, or using three pieces

2) Circuit boards don't bend.  Well, they do, they just don't work very well afterward.  Again, this means either FLEX (Expensive), Rigid FLEX (Even more Expensive), or three circuit boards (Pain in the Ass)

joanne wrote:

Can't wait to see the pictures of it in action on your Jeep. Aren't you concerned that the light beam will catch bushes or trees on fire as you drive past? Wink

Neither can I!  I'm quite excited to get it fired up, tested, and installed.  With as much time, energy, and money as I've put into this, I'm more concerned that the light beam will not catch bushes and trees on fire Smile

joanne wrote:

Thanks so much for taking the time to share this process with all of us!

My pleasure.  I've always enjoyed sharing the things that I'm involved in.  Thanks for all your kind words!

 

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

JonnyC wrote:

This thread makes me wish I went into electrical and/or mechanical engineering. For now I'm stuck flashing C programs onto assembled microcontroller boards using code developed by someone else, then wiring them into a heatsink developed by someone on the CNC and installing it into a Maglite.  Makes my "modding" seem so very modest.

We all have wishes about what we should have gone into - trust me Smile  The C programs you speak of are really not that complex - you should take some time and learn what they do.  Programming a microcontroller isn't horribly complicated - especially with the fairly simple nature of what we're doing here.  It's kind of fun, in fact.  There are BASIC compilers for both Atmel and Microchip uControllers as well - BASIC has a much easier learning curve for a non-programmer because it's "Natural Language"

Basic Code looks like: 

IF PINB.B5 = 1 (If the PIN at PORT B5 is HIGH)
     BRIGHT = 127 (Set Variable BRIGHT to 127 - if we're using 8 bit variables, then this is about half)
     PORTB.B3 = 0 (Set the pin at PORT B3 LOW)
END IF

JonnyC wrote:

I can see a lot of off-road guys wanting a product like this, depending on the price.  You should send one in to Xtreme 4X4 on the Power Block Smile

We'll see - For now this is a hobby project... I haven't put a lot of thought into making this a 'product'.. I'm not ruling it out, I'm just not ruling it in...

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

pounder
pounder's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 11 months ago
Joined: 01/20/2011 - 16:43
Posts: 1788
Location: Ontario

PilotPTK wrote:

pounder wrote:

man i'd love to install one of these on my scooter lol..seriously! would have doubts about supplying it with enough power though..

At full blast, assuming your scooter has a 12V electrical system, you'd need to supply this with about 21 Amps of current.  I kind of doubt the average scooter has an alternator that could keep up with that - but I'm not at all sure.

There is, however, no reason you couldn't run something like this at less-than-full-blast to fit its output to the available power.  Even at 50% brightness, which would only require about 11 Amps, you're talking about 12,000 Lumens at the emitter, and over 10,000 out the front (after Optics Loss and Protective Lens Loss).  A 55 watt halogen head-light need 4.5 Amps, so 11 Amps is not a crazy number, I would assume.

PPtk

oh yeah way too much lol..the 11 amps would probably be possible, but would be quite taxing..it runs 2 35-watts and is able to do 55's..there are even some guys with hid setups and they work quite well..10 000 lumens would be amazing..let me know what you're charging for this setup Wink

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Enclosure and other miscellaneous metal bits will be back in my hands after anodizing tomorrow.  This is the color scheme I decided on for the first light.  I have a second one that will be a little less obnoxious - but I wanted something stand-out-ish for the first show piece Smile

PPtk

first Enclosure

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

I kinda figured the optic couldn't touch the emitter.  Obviously, I'm forgetting we're not talking about reflected light but rather, focused light?  I'm still having a hard time understanding how it projects so far.

And . . . didn't know there were two being built.

 

Foy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Flashlight Foy wrote:

I kinda figured the optic couldn't touch the emitter.  Obviously, I'm forgetting we're not talking about reflected light but rather, focused light?  I'm still having a hard time understanding how it projects so far.

And . . . didn't know there were two being built.

 

Foy

Well, it is still reflected light for all intents and purposes.. It's just that it's reflected inside the optic rather than off the edges of a reflector.  Both types of optic have their merit.  Light inside a TIR optic is reflected not necessarily just once - think of it like a diamond.  It's shaped so that light continually bounces around until it comes straight out the front.  The multiple reflections is what allows the optic to be smaller.

As for the two being built - I always build at least two of everything I do.  This way, I have one to put in my collection of 'cool stuff I've made' and another to actually use.  It's also a bit safer since if I happen to blow one up, the whole project doesn't die. (not that I've ever blown something up [Big Smirk])

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

Well, there's always risk when pushing the envelope and the diamond analogy helps because I do understand that.  A TIR specifically magnifies the light.

 

coolFoy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Hello everyone,

Enclosures and metal bits are back from the Anodizer.  They did a great job, as usual.

Pics of the enclosure:
Enclosure1 
Enclosure2 

 

The double layer acrylic protection lens is also done:
Lens

 

As are the mounting brackets, cable grip and bezel surround
Bezel

Back-Side shot:
BackEnclosure 

 

Since this is going to be used on a vehicle, I designed the enclosure to IP67 Standards (impervious to dust, safe to submerge up to 1M).  This is the custom 100% silicone (good to over 500 degrees F) seal for the front bezel.
Silicone Seal 

 

One last shot.. The markings on top are just dust - the anodizing is quite flawless..
EnclosureMain 

 

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Foy
Foy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/02/2011 - 17:56
Posts: 3009
Location: Las Vegas

So . . . . what color is your Grand Cherokee?  Or, this is the show piece and Mr. Silver goes on the Jeep.  Man, that is some fine looking ano.

 

Foy

No referral links and nothing embedded . . . ever.

                      &nbsp

PilotPTK
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 5 days ago
Joined: 09/04/2011 - 21:53
Posts: 1736
Location: Michigan, USA

Flashlight Foy wrote:

So . . . . what color is your Grand Cherokee?

Dark Blue (Royal Blue)

 

Flashlight Foy wrote:

  Or, this is the show piece and Mr. Silver goes on the Jeep.  Man, that is some fine looking ano.

This is the show piece for my collection - The second one will be the one that goes on the Jeep.  I haven't decided on a color for that one yet - It probably won't be silver because I want it anodized for corrosion protection.  I suppose I could do clear anodize, but that seems so boring Smile  I'm kicking around the idea of having it done in a dark blue to match the jeep with the accents (bezel, brackets) in chrome or silver (just like the accents on the Jeep).  Undecided though..

The shop I use for anodizing does an incredible job.  They're certified to do MIL-Spec Anodizing and Chemical Conversion Coatings (MIL-A-8625 Type I, II, IIB and III and MIL-DTL-5541 Class 1A and 3) so they're work is pretty top notch.  Amazingly, they're really quite reasonable if I'm willing to wait for the next batch they do of the type I need.  They did my enclosure for 40.00 USD and the accessories in black for an extra 10.00 USD.  It would have been even less expensive if I would have chosen a more common color like Red, Blue or Black.  The enclosure is type II, Class 2 and the accessories are Type III, Class 2.  Type III doesn't dye well with bright/light colors, which is why I went with the lower type on the main enclosure.

PPtk

I am currently extremely busy with work. Please do not expect a response from me quickly. I will be dropping in as time permits, but the amount of time I can dedicate to responding to topics and PMs is very limited.

Chicago X
Chicago X's picture
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 7 months ago
Joined: 07/22/2011 - 16:13
Posts: 4013
Location: See Name

For the user, you may want to consider road rash and go for the thickest coating available.

http://wardogsmakingithome.org/index.html

War Dogs, Making it Home - Rescue Dogs for Returning Vets

edc
edc's picture
Offline
Last seen: 7 years 3 months ago
Joined: 01/16/2011 - 02:28
Posts: 3300
Location: NSW AUSTRALIA

I might be weird but that is beautiful!

 

http://i1193.photobucket.com/albums

Pages