Review: Xtar B20 Pilot, Now with Full Video Review (added 7-29-13)

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mhanlen
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Review: Xtar B20 Pilot, Now with Full Video Review (added 7-29-13)

Review: Xtar B20 Pilot

First off, if you want to skip the text here’s a full alternate video review. Complete with cheezy music!

I want to thank Ken at Xtar for the opportunity to review this light. I’m still fairly new to this, so bear with me. I don’t own a lot of the high tech stuff that some of the awesome reviewers have, so I’ll just try to take a lot of interesting pictures and test the light thoroughly- and hopefully you can decide if this light deserves your hard earned money. Anyway Xtar seems to be releasing quite a few new lights, and their new 18650 light had me interested because of it’s claimed output, nice runtimes, that and it being relatively compact. And as far as I know, since this light is so super brand new (released late last month), I think this is the only review of it right now. Since I go backpack camping several times a year I like bringing along a nice variable output light to use at night while doing chores around the campsite- because there’s no source of artificial light in the national forest. It also needs to be tough, relatively compact, resistant to the elements, and reliable. And according to the initial specifications it seems to fit the bill.

Ok so here are the manufacturer rated specs. Starting with runtimes first.

ANSI Turbo High Mid Low Signal
Lumens 1000 600 250 30 250
Runtime with 3100 mah xtar 3.1 3.3 7.5 70 —-

Technical specs.

Beam Throw 210 meters
Max Intensity 11100cd
Waterproof IPX8
LED Type Cree XM-L U3 with 50000 Lifespan
Construction Materials 6N01 Aluminum Alloy, Type III Anodized
Working Voltage 2.7-4.2v
Battery Single 18650/186700 Battery Protected & Unprotected
Switch Clicky Tactical Cap Switch with Momentary on
Size 34.5mm head diameter, 24.5 body & tail dia., 140mm length
Weight 113g without battery
Additional Functions Memory function after 2-3 seconds, Hidden signal mode

This light comes in two bundles: The full set packaging and the simple set packaging. Xtar sent me the full set for review. Although you do not see the holster in my pics, Ken assured me it does come with the retail set, and simple set. No worries though, I have plenty of extra light holsters I don’t use.

Here’s a quick table that differentiates the included items in each bundle.

Full set Flashlight, Stainless steel clip, holster, lanyard, extra o-ring, flashlight manual, warranty card, 18650 3100 mah battery, car adapter, home adapter, USB mini cord (for chargers), MP1S Charger, charger manual
Simple set Flashlight, Stainless steel clip, holster, lanyard, extra o-ring, flashlight manual, warranty card

The light was shipped on a Monday, and it arrived Thursday of the same week via DHL. I have absolutely never gotten anything that fast from Hong Kong. After opening the DHL plastic envelop, the set was further protected with bubble wrap inside.

!The Package!

Xtar B20 Pilot Plastic Case Front

xtar B20 Pilot Rear of Case

And inside the case.

XTar B20 Full Kit

Here is the b20 with warranty card, MP1S charger manual, and the B20 manual. Since many of the budget lights I’ve purchased have come with terrible or no instructions, it was great reading something that clearly explained the operation of the light and charger.

Xtar b20 Pilot Included Documentation

One great thing about this set, in fact it’s probably my favorite thing about the full/deluxe/whatever you want to call it set, is that they include a high quality cell to run your light off of. I’m pretty sure I’ve read that the battery is just a rebranded Pansonic 3100 mah cell- but that’s a good thing. It helps you get very nice runtimes out of it, which you’ll see later in the review.

xtar 3100mah 18650

This is the xtra o-ring and manual that comes in the set. They both come packaged in that little baggy. From a personal preference, when I carry lights, I like to use a clip and very rarely do I use the lanyard. I do like the lanyard to have a quick detach mechanism like this one does. It’s the details folks!

lanyard and o-ring

Anyway, on to the review. The full set is packaged very nicely. I love the case- I wish all lights came like this. It may lead to a shelf space problem eventually, but it’s awesome from an organizational perspective. The full package obviously includes every single thing you’d need for this light if you’re just getting into lithium ion lights. While this is my first Xtar light, it’s not the first xtar product I own. Prior to this set I had purchased (and still own) the WPII Mark 2 charger and a set of their 2600 mah blue label batteries. With those in mind and the general communities consensus that Xtar makes a very fine charger and battery, I had high hopes.

Ok first the charger. Here are the manufacturer rated specs for the SP1S

Operation Temperature 0~40 C
Input Voltage/Current DC 5v/ 500mA
Output Voltage/Max. Current DC 4.2v (+/- .05v)/ 500mA
Weight 33g

Xtar MP1S Charger and cords

Here are the battery types Xtar says it charges and the amount of spacers it needs to charge them. Take note though, that this kit does not include any of the spacers. If you own any other Xtar chargers you may have a few of these laying around- like I do.

Battery sizes Spacers needed
14650/17670/18650/18700 0
14500 2
10440 3
16340/18350 4
15270 5

And as an added bonus this charger also accepts some 26650s as I have personally tested. No modification necessary for the battery I charged with it.

Other manufacturer specs about the MP1S that are noteworthy. These are taken from the manual.

  • When the input voltage is removed (the charger is unplugged but you leave the battery in the charger), the charger will be in a low current status automatically and lowers the discharge voltage to below 4uA
  • The charger is designed to charge the above listed 3.7v li-ion batteries. The MP1S has been designed with a TC.CC.CV charging algorithm which monitors the battery charging in real time and controls the charging safely and automatically.
  • The charging management will monitor the IC (integrated circuits) temperature and if the charger gets too hot, it will lower the charging current to ensure continued safe charging.
  • When charging has been completed, the charger will monitor the batteries voltage and will restart charging if the battery falls to 4.0v.

There are definitely better qualified individuals here that can dissect the finer points of chargers better than myself. And if you don’t want to take my word for it there are actually a few much better reviews of this charger on the net, which indicate it’s pretty decent. But I will contribute the following observations. Charge time isn’t fast, but that’s to be expected with a 500mA charger. You could always buy something like the WP2 if that’s a problem. Considering the runtimes of the flashlight, you probably won’t need to charge it that often. It’s well made, and simple. Not much to break on the charger. The spring design means you won’t have to worry about a slider breaking- something I have had a problem with on cheaper chargers. My particular model charges my 18650 batteries to 4.19v, and the batteries never get anymore than slightly warm (just slightly above room temperature). I love the USB cord design, that allows you to use it with the car adapter and the 120v standard wall outlet. I wish more battery chargers had this feature. The charger has a mini-USB port, whereas the outlets have the standard USB plug. It makes it super versatile, because if you ever lost the cord or needed a longer one they’re very very easy to source. You probably have several laying around the house. Oh and did I mention it can unofficially charge 26650s? I can’t verify more than the current 26650 I own, but it charges that one to 4.19vs too. I mean technically the charger is NOT designed for 26650s, I’m just saying that I have a 26650 and it charged it to the proper voltage.

!Xtar MP1S Charging a 26650!

Ok, so what about the light?? How big is it? Here are a few shots that give an idea of scale.

Next to a Convoy S6/Xiaozhi.

Xtar B20 Pilot with Convoy S6 Size comparison

Next to some of my EDC stuff.

Xtar B20 Pilot EDC Size Comparison

For my tastes it’s slightly too big for blue jeans style EDC. Some people think that the S6 is even too big for EDC, so it’s a fair point. If you wear cargo pants and jackets or use a holster then it might be an EDC for you. I walked around with it in some shorts (with cargo pockets) and I barely noticed it. I used the clip. Which brings up something I’ve been thinking on. This would make a great general purpose light for bike commuters. It has a ton more runtime than some of those 4×18650 bike lights- and it can be removed easily at the end of the ride. The slight downside is that it doesn’t put out as many lumens as some of the scorchers do, but in my opinion a well made light like this- given the runtimes is a much better choice. It is plenty plenty bright for a bike light. It combines the right amount of spill and throw to light up what’s directly in front of you and what’s further down the road/trail.

Check it out.

Xtar Pilot on the Bike 1

Xtar B20 Pilot on the Bike 3

Xtar B20 Pilot on the Bike 2

Also, who cares about rain when it’s waterproof down to 2 meters? Seriously, let it get soaked.

Xtar b20 Pilot submerged

Ok It has a removable stainless-steel clip, that’s fairly strong.

Xtar B20 Without Clip 2

Xtar B20 Pilot Tail Clip

Here is the light without the clip.

Xtar B20 Without Clip

Next to the EA4W, something I will use as a benchmark in this review- mostly because it’s popular.

Xtar B20 and EA4W Size Comparison

The light fits nicely in my hand, and has depressions around the diameter to rest your thumb.

Xtar B20 In Hand

Xtar B20 Pilot Thumb Depressions 1

Xtar B20 Pilot Thumb Depressions 2

Xtar B20 Pilot Thumb Depressions 3

If you examine the macros, you’ll see the attention to quality control is pretty excellent. I detected absolutely no areas of the finish that were spotty. Everything is nice and satin-y. Not too shiny and not too matte. It’s smooth but, not slick.

Xtar B20 Pilot Knurling Long Ways

Xtar B20 Pilot with Logo 3

XTar B20 Pilot Serial #

Xtar B20 Pilot Hot Surface

Xtar B20 In the Tree

Xtar B20 Pilot on Tree

The bezel is stainless steel and the reflector is butter smooth and highly polished. No plastic here.

Xtar Pilot B20 on Tree 2

Xtar B20 Bezel

Xtar B20 Bezel and reflector 2

Xtar B20 Pilot Bezel 1

Here’s what it looks like when I remove the reflector, bezel, and optics. The tempered glass lens is coated and actually very thick. My camera wasn’t able to pick up the purple-ish sheen, but trust me- it’s there. Xtar’s site claims 98.5% transmittance, compared to the 89%-92% of regular glass. There’s also the standard o-ring to lock out moisture. Again, all high quality components.

Xtar b20 Bezel Lens and oring

Xtar B20 Pilot Reflector Inside

Xtar B20 Lens Thickness

This is the plastic spacer that sits between the reflector and the emitter board. Astounding!

Xtar B20 emitter plastic spacer

Since the pill seems to be glued in, I wasn’t able to remove it.

Here’s what it looks inside. Look Xtar even has a logo there.

Xtar XML Emitter

And now the tailcap. Ok, I have to admit… I’ve gotten so used to reverse clickies that I thought the light wasn’t working properly when I first started playing with it. The light is a regular clicky with momentary on. Just like a maglite. The UI is laid out the following way: High, Turbo, Medium, Low. To scroll though modes you have to basically turn it on and off quickly to go to the next mode. After it’s been off for 2 or 3 seconds it remembers the last mode you had it on. Pretty straightforward.

Xtar B20 Pilot Switch Boot

It has a hole for the included lanyard.

Xtar B20 Pilot Laynard Hole

Here is the switch assembly taken apart.

Xtar B20 Tail Switch assembly stacked

B20 Tailcap Disassembly

xtar b20 Switch

Oh and it can accommodate both protected and unprotected batteries. Picture one is what an unprotected looks like in it. Picture two is the protected battery that comes with the deluxe set. Also take a look at the well-lubed anodized threads. That’s the factory lube on it folks! Let’s get excited about lube!

Xtar B20 Pilot with Unprotected Battery

Xtar B20 Pilot with Protected Battery

The tailcap and the main tube make electrical contact via the un-anodized bottom of the main tube. Since there’s not an electrical switch there’s no need to unscrew it to lock it out.

Xtar B20 Pilot Tailcap Lube

Ok, so I was most attracted to this light due to it’s long run times. Would I be able to take it camping and not have to bring any extra batteries?

Ok, so I was most attracted to this light due to it’s long run times. Would I be able to take it camping and not have to bring any extra batteries?

For my first runtime test I turned on the light to Turbo mode and let it run. Again, because of the way the UI is laid out, turbo is second. Since I do not have an integrating sphere or a lux meter, I decided to take a series of photographs to detect the drop in output over time- if any. I actually attempted run time outputs several times before figuring out what makes the most sense- working with the equipment I have. A Sony dsc-w330 point and shoot, with no adjustable controls- and a borrowed and beat up 6.0 megapixel DSLR with only a 50mm lens. For my beamshots and runtime tests I used the DSLR so I could control shutter, iso, and f-stop. A 50mm prime does not offer a whole lot of flexibility, so forgive the lack of perspective in the shots. When possible I used my point and shot to give an idea on how my tests were set up.

I know, blah blah.

Runtime tests were conducted the following way. I placed the b20 on a ledge in a dark stairwell in the house. I set up the DSLR on a tripod and set the iso to 400, f-stop to 1.8, and my shutter to 1/100. The lens of the camera is about 8 foot 10 inches to the white wall, the the light is tail-standing about an inch from the wall. I have no real reason for determining this distance, except maybe because I liked the framing. I determined my camera settings by approximating what my naked eye saw.

The way I determined how many pictures to take on Turbo and High mode, was to look at xtar’s estimated runtime for each mode, and basically take a picture every thirty minutes until it surpassed or came within the estimated manufacturer specs. The only deviation from the 30 minute formula was: I took my second picture 10 minutes in to try and detect any initial output drop. You’ll see this on turbo mode. So it goes like this: 0 mins, 10 mins, 30 mins, an hour, and so on.

Here is Turbo mode. Notice it has a pretty even drop in brightness. There seems to be a fairly quick initial brightness drop-off in the first 10 minutes. Again though, even though it seems to be a sort of large drop, it wasn’t detectable by my eyes. In the chart I have indicated the starting voltage and amperage, and then did a second reading at the end of the test. I apologize for the focus issue- I had done several other tests before this one- which I had not posted and the camera was in focus for those tests. Maybe it was bumped? I didn’t realize until I was making the chart in photoshop. I would have redone it, but charge time and test time runs an extra 7 hours- time I don’t have. Even though the focus is off in this one, there’s a very discernible difference between the different mode charts. And it’s easy to tell that the out of focus one starts off much brighter.

Turbo runtime chip sheet

Alright and now High mode. There’s quite a big difference in behavior between the two charts. The High chart maintains a much more even brightness up until the final frame, and then it drops off fairly suddenly. It’s even darker than the final frame in the Turbo mode. That and the final voltage and amperage is much lower than the turbo mode. It seems to be anyway that it you need the maximum brightness for a sustained period of time, maybe stick with turbo mode because of the more even power curve?

chip chart high mode

How about medium mode now. Since the length of time nearly doubled with this test, I took pictures every hour. Camera settings are all identical to the other run time charts.

Chip chart medium 1

And finally low mode.

Several things to note about the low mode runtime test. I had to adjust the camera settings for the low mode on the light because the previous 1/100 shutter speed I used on the other runtime tests wasn’t going to be able to show off the light well. Second, there’s a much greater time between pictures to help reduce the amount of data- and makes it much easier to digest at a glance. Also, those were the only regular intervals that I could be home to take the picture. The final picture, taken at about 43 hours, should be considered a “moonlight” type mode. In order to show the light was still on, I repeated and enhanced the final photo to illustrate that the light was still on. This picture was taken about 330 in the morning, and at that point it was flickering slightly, probably because the light was attempting to hit a low voltage shutoff battery protection. When I awoke again at around 7am the light had shut off. So there is a little less than 4 hours margin of error on the total runtime. I was unable to get it to turn back on.

For me though the amount of useful light probably runs out around the 30-33 hour mark. Of course if you’re using it for more than 30 hours straight, then maybe you’re in an emergency situation and then you still have about 10ish hours of low intensity to moonlight mode anyway (after the 30 hours). One other thing to note is that the battery protection did not kick in. Because I would get a brief flash of light when I attempted to turn the light on, I assume the lights low voltage feature cuts the light off somewhere in the 2.6ish voltage range.

Low Run time Sheet picture

A few other notes about these tests.

Ok, so you’ll notice that at the 3 and a half hour mark on turbo and high there’s still a good amount of light? Both modes seem to maintain a very steady curve in drop off- to my naked eye. I did not detect any hard mode switching. Both modes basically just keep running and running. In fact, I did a test to see how long it would run on high mode. I started at 310pm and let it run until 1120pm. Yes, 8 hours and 10 minutes. At that point the light was barely above a moonlight mode. I got sick of waiting and shut it off. When beginning I started out with a 4.19v battery running at 1.25 amps. The ending? 2.6v at .01 amps.

Oh and a sort of lumen comparison. Last night I decided to do a beamshot comparison after the xtar had been on Turbo for 4 hours. I found the “Low” setting on the EA4W to be most comparable in brightness.

Turbo Beamshot Comparison after 4 hours

Ok, before we get to the beamshots lets do a tint comparison.

The Xtar is quite a bit cooler than the EA4W (nuetral white tint). I know sometimes side by side tint comparisons can be slightly misleading. If I’m going to describe it… it’s quite a bit cooler than a NW tint, but it’s not super blue like some of the cheaper budget lights. On the other hand it’s not 3AA LED maglite green either.

Xtar b20 and EA4W Tint Comparison 1

Xtar and Nitecore Tint Comparison 2

Ok now the wall beam profiles with tailcap measurements.

The photos are labeled so I believe they speak for themselves. These shots were with me holding the flashlight away from the wall about 2 feet-ish.

High

B20 Beamshot High

Turbo

b20 beamshot turbo

Medium

b20 beamshot medium

Low

b20 beamshot low

Alrighty. Here are some outdoor beamshots. I used the Flexcandles Asgard Neutral white, and the EA4W. The Asgard is definitely the thrower. It has a much tighter hotspot than the Pilot and the EA4W. The EA4W is a nice balance between the Pilot and the Asgard. While not a floody light per se, the Pilot has a smaller reflector than the other two, so that needs to be taken into consideration.

Without further ado. Here is a shot that I did with my point and shoot that lays out basic distances. That light pole is about 40-50 feet high- by visual estimation. And it should be noted it sits about 20 feet further away than the vines in the images below. I’d really like to have a nice DSLR, with a few lenses so I could shoot these on the same camera- but for now, this is what I’ll make do with. So bear with me.

Beamshot Distance Gauge 2.

Ok the EA4 on High and Turbo. I wish I had some lights a little closer in style to the Pilot, but since the EA4W is such a popular light, it can be used as a sort of metric. As I accumulate lights, I’ll try to do more apt beam comparisons. Although this gives you a good idea of what the Pilot “is” and “isn’t.” I’ve seen the EA4W rated anywhere from 720-890 lumens.

EA4 on Turbo

ea4 on High

The Pilot.

High.

b20 Pilot on High

Turbo.

b20 pilot on Turbo with distances

Medium.

b20 on medium

Low.

Xtar Barrier shot Low

The Asgard on High/Turbo (whatever the highest factory setting the light comes with is)… supposedly it’s about 900ish lumens. Very focused.

Asgard on Turbo

Ok how about those vines in the daylight photo? This is just with the Pilot.

It’s pretty far away. Here’s the Pilot. Remember even though I shot the daytime shot and the nighttime shot with two different cameras, the tripod is in the exact same place- for all of the outdoor shots.

High.

xtar vines high

Turbo.

xtar vines turbo with distances

Medium

Xtar Vines Medium

Low.

xtar vines low

So now we are down to the the final comparison. The “extreme light tower throw.” This one will make the light bleed. The camera is set to the exact same settings as it has been on all the other nighttime shots.

Low. The B20 Pilot. To be honest, I could actually make out the light pole with my eyes- even on low mode, although you can’t tell that here. But I couldn’t alter the settings.

b20 pilot extreme throw

Medium.

b20 pilot extreme throw medium

Turbo. The Pilot definitely shows more of the pole than the Asgard and and EA4W on turbo.
b20 extreme on Turbo with distances

High.

b20 extreme throw High

The Asgard kills both lights in the hotspot intensity contest.

asgard extreme throw high

The EA4.

ea4w extreme throw test high

Final thoughts.

First off let’s just say this light gets a big thumbs up, and here are several points why.

  • It’s well built. Everything is machined perfectly and the coating is flawless. There are no cheap parts making up this light. Coated lens, gold plated battery contacts, very nice switch, it has it all.
  • It’s well regulated, and offers excellent runtimes. There is no PWM. I tried finding it with the running water test and fan test, and couldn’t see any traces.
  • It’s plenty bright and plenty dim for most tasks. I think all flashlights need a moonlight mode though. Putting a moonlight mode in this one would have shot it into space.
  • Nice beam pattern, and nice tint. Not harsh in any way. Nice balance of throw and spill for a pocketable light.
  • Strobe mode is well hidden, you need to practice it to activate it. The perfect way to implement strobe.
  • Mode memory.
  • Waterproof.

I will also get a video review up later this week or next week, that gives some basic overviews and is a little easier to digest. Xtar refers to this as a general purpose sport light. I think flexibility is it’s greatest asset. It is portable enough for a large pocket and tiny enough to fit in any backpack. It performs beautifully as a bike light, and it’s resistant to the elements. Need a: glove box, backpack, or camping light, then you’ve found it.

Thanks for looking everyone.

Edited by: sb56637 on 08/26/2014 - 17:19
carmantl
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Excellent review!

mhanlen
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Thanks carmantl, I spent many hours on it.

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Very nice review sir. Bravo!

MRsDNF
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Thanks for the review. Nicely done for what looks like a nice light.

 

djozz quotes, "it came with chinese lettering that is chinese to me".

                      "My man mousehole needs one too"

old4570 said "I'm not an expert , so don't suffer from any such technical restrictions".

Old-Lumens. Highly admired and cherished member of Budget Light Forum. 11.5.2011 - 20.12.16. RIP.

 

Annie-one
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Could it be a EDC light?

No Difficulty,no fun.

Spasmod
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My hat is off to you Sir.. What a fantastic indepth and detailed review. Thanks very much indeed for the tremendous amount of effort and dedication!

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Well done review on a great looking light! I really like how you did the runtime photos. Smile

mhanlen
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JohnnyMac wrote:

Well done review on a great looking light! I really like how you did the runtime photos. Smile

Thanks. It was my work around for not having a lux meter. It actually donned on me after having done two other runtime tests with pictures that didn’t make it into the review- that I should take all the pictures at the same and regular intervals. Sounds simple right? I had the day off so I basically baby sat them.

Annie-one wrote:
Could it be a EDC light?

For my tastes it’s just slightly too large. It fit’s nicely in jackets and pants with larger pockets though- I could hardly tell it’s there in some of my cargo shorts.

jacktheclipper
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Cool

What I do

 

mhanlen
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Oh, in case anyone wants to check out larger versions- including a ton of photos that didn’t make it- here is where the photos are hosted.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhanlen1/sets/72157634698040787/with/933534...

If you’re a flickr member feel free to add me as a contact.

mhanlen
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Ok, I added some more pictures. Including using it as a bike light, and expanded on some of my initial thoughts. Also a medium mode run time chart will be up around 10pm tonight. It’s a 7 and a half hour test.

Spasmod wrote:

My hat is off to you Sir.. What a fantastic indepth and detailed review. Thanks very much indeed for the tremendous amount of effort and dedication!

You’re reviews are pretty great too!

Tecmo wrote:
Very nice review sir. Bravo!

Thanks, these really take a while.

MRsDNF wrote:
Thanks for the review. Nicely done for what looks like a nice light.

It is a very nice light and set. A great multipurpose, and compact light.

jacktheclipper wrote:

Cool

Wink

Back at cha!

mhanlen
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As I promised. 7.5 hour run time chart. This one was broken up by hour instead of half hour because of the length. The settings are identical to the other charts, so you can compare.

Chip chart medium 1

relic38
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Great review mhanlen! Very unique way of capturing the run time output. Looks like a great light. Beer

Welcome the night.

My Reviews   My Mods    http://budgetlightforum.com/search?

mhanlen
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relic38 wrote:
Great review mhanlen! Very unique way of capturing the run time output. Looks like a great light. Beer

Thanks, much appreciated! Just making due with the tools I’m given.

mhanlen
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Since I also posted this review on CPF, someone mentioned that I didn’t comment on it’s lack of PWM. Since I hadn’t noticed it like I did on other obvious examples like the Small Sun Zy-T11 or the SRK, it slipped my mind. I did the fan test and the shower/running water test- and compared it to all my other lights… the verdict…

No PWM on any mode (except on beacon/strobe- because it’s picked up in the video at one point). It appears to be well regulated. I mean considering the even curve in output levels I’d assumed this anyway.

mhanlen
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Finally, here is the runtime test on low.

Several things to note. I had to adjust the camera settings for the low mode on the light because the previous 1/100 shutter speed I used on the other runtime tests wasn't going to be able to show off the light well. Second, there's a much greater time between pictures to help reduce the amount of data- and makes it much easier to digest at a glance. Also, those were the only regular intervals that I could be home to take the picture. The final picture, taken at about 43 hours, should be considered a "moonlight" type mode. In order to show the light was still on, I repeated and enhanced the final photo to illustrate that the light was still on. This picture was taken about 330 in the morning, and at that point it was flickering slightly, probably because the light was attempting to hit a low voltage shutoff battery protection. When I awoke again at around 7am the light had shut off. So there is a little less than 4 hours margin of error on the total runtime. I was unable to get it to turn back on.

 

For me though the amount of useful light probably runs out around the 30-33 hour mark. Of course if you're using it for more than 30 hours straight, then maybe you're in an emergency situation and then you still have about 10ish hours of low intensity to moonlight mode anyway (after the 30 hours). One other thing to note is that the battery protection did not kick in. Because I would get a brief flash of light when I attempted to turn the light on, I assume the lights low voltage feature cuts the light off somewhere in the 2.6ish voltage range. Ok here it is.... The initial review has also been updated.

Low Run time Sheet picture

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mhanlen wrote:
Thanks carmantl, I spent many hours on it.

Just entered the site and saw this thread. Great review, lots of pictures Love thanks! Looks like amazing light.


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mhanlen
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Ok, I finally finished the full video review, making this review a double whammy. It has tons of cheezy music.

jacktheclipper
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Nice video .

Very comprehensive .

I like the part at about 5:04 where it appears that the low voltage protection turned the light off as you were going down a flight of stairs ...

Laughing

What I do

 

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jacktheclipper wrote:

Nice video .

Very comprehensive .

I like the part at about 5:04 where it appears that the low voltage protection turned the light off as you were going down a flight of stairs ...

Laughing

 

Thanks!  That was "simulated" of course- to illustrate the point of low voltage protection.   When real low voltage protection kicks in on this light, it definitely won't show up on my camera.  It's outputting moonlight mode levels at that point- so it'll probably be accidental.

sb56637
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Thanks a lot for the review! Frontpage’d and Sticky’d.

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